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NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Bas Brummans believes in taking an "inner and outer journey" when you travel. The life coach and professional photographer based in Amsterdam offers small group tours - two to three people - for eight days in the Dutch city, Paris and France's Loire Valley. The idea is to use the personal coaching sessions to develop a life path during stops on the tour , i.e., visiting spiritual places in Utrecht, Delft or Den Haag in the Netherlands or sampling wines at Chinon in the Loire Valley. Brummans says via email that "travel is a powerful catalyst for new awareness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | SANDY BANKS
Wendy Newton's first impulse was to just say no: She wasn't going to volunteer her life-coaching services to women on skid row. She has two young children and a "person-centered branding" business with demanding clients. She didn't want to waste hours in rush-hour traffic, crawling from Beverly Hills to downtown Los Angeles every week. But then she remembered how good it felt when she worked with inner-city teens years before. So she agreed to try skid row. "I thought, 'These are grown women.
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HOME & GARDEN
July 10, 2010 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
If you want to plant a garden, cook what you grow, find a husband, be a better husband, get a baby to sleep, get along with a teenager, get that teenager into college, get a divorce or lose 20 pounds, you don't have to go it alone. There's a coach to help you find your way just about anywhere you'd like to go. Muddling through on our own doesn't seem to be much of an option today. The urge to do things perfectly — or as close as possible — and the fear that we're not up to the task has opened the field of coaching in myriad subjects, from coaching high-level executives in time management to coaching parents about how to communicate with their nannies.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Bas Brummans believes in taking an "inner and outer journey" when you travel. The life coach and professional photographer based in Amsterdam offers small group tours - two to three people - for eight days in the Dutch city, Paris and France's Loire Valley. The idea is to use the personal coaching sessions to develop a life path during stops on the tour , i.e., visiting spiritual places in Utrecht, Delft or Den Haag in the Netherlands or sampling wines at Chinon in the Loire Valley. Brummans says via email that "travel is a powerful catalyst for new awareness.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, Bob Pranga's life was a mess. Unable to get his acting career off the ground, he was $60,000 in debt and working three jobs as a waiter, tour guide and department store clerk to keep afloat. Instead of turning to a therapist or a credit counseling agency to turn his life around, he hired Rick Tamlyn, a personal or life coach from Sherman Oaks. They talked every week, with Pranga paying $50 a visit to sort out what was important to him and how to develop a plan for getting it.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
So you think your family is nuts? The fraternal train wreck of Gary Lennon's "A Family Thing," now having its world premiere in an Echo Theater Company production at Stage 52, will have you feeling Norman Rockwell-y about even those relatives whose loose-cannon remarks make you want to dive under the dining room table during the holidays. Compared with Lennon's crew - one's an addict, one's a felon, one's a suicidal writer - most of us can claim fairly normal pedigrees. Or at least we can be grateful that we're not reliving a version of the Cain and Abel story, relocated to the mean streets of Martin Scorsese's New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2005 | Kate Aurthur, Special to The Times
ON a humid summer day in New York City, Rhonda Britten, a life coach on the syndicated daily reality series "Starting Over," was in a boutique in SoHo. A stylishly dressed middle-aged woman approached her and said she was a fan of the show. Somewhat tentatively, she also said, "You've changed so many women's lives." Britten directed her full attention to the stranger. "Has it changed your life?" she asked. The woman paused and then simply answered, "Yes, it has."
NEWS
June 5, 2003
I did a spit-take with a mouthful of my cereal and chuckled as I read Christopher Noxon's "It Takes a Village to Help One Man" (May 29). I have come to the conclusion that you can save yourself a lot of money and time with just one person. Your mom! Mom as Physical Trainer: "I don't care if 'Lizzie McGuire' is on, turn off the TV and go play outside with the neighbor kids." Mom as Color Consultant: "That pink hair just isn't you!" Mom as Spiritual Advisor: "You forgot your science book?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
UNDERRATED Romany Malco : Maybe better known by one of the names on his Twitter bio ("The Black Guy From '40 Yr. Old Virgin'"), Malco should finally make a name for himself as a top-tier comic talent in "Think Like a Man," a new film with stand-up star Kevin Hart. Malco was a scene stealer in Showtime's "Weeds" and the aforementioned Apatow movie, but his Web-friendly turn as life coach Tijuana Jackson on "Funny or Die" helped take him to the next level. Playoff hockey : Regardless of whether the L.A. Kings continue their torrid pace or revert to the underdog No. 8 seed they are, few experiences in sports are as riveting as the NHL playoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2011 | Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19): Beware of those who would benefit from your thinking the solution is beyond you — for instance, a drug company, life coach, politician or makeup manufacturer. Taurus (April 20-May 20): Something you once wanted to do now seems like the opposite of fun. Perhaps the risk/reward ratio is askew, or perhaps your mood has changed. Gemini (May 21-June 21): You do exactly what you say you'll do. This is made even easier if you don't say you'll do anything, freeing yourself up completely.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
So you think your family is nuts? The fraternal train wreck of Gary Lennon's "A Family Thing," now having its world premiere in an Echo Theater Company production at Stage 52, will have you feeling Norman Rockwell-y about even those relatives whose loose-cannon remarks make you want to dive under the dining room table during the holidays. Compared with Lennon's crew - one's an addict, one's a felon, one's a suicidal writer - most of us can claim fairly normal pedigrees. Or at least we can be grateful that we're not reliving a version of the Cain and Abel story, relocated to the mean streets of Martin Scorsese's New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Many of the elements that make up "Ganesh Versus the Third Reich," the internationally acclaimed offering from the Australian company Back to Back Theatre, will be familiar to theatergoers of an avant-garde bent. There's the mixing of Eastern and Western iconography. There's the metatheatrical high jinks in which a good portion of the show is about the making of the show. And then there's the old standby, the close scrutiny of ever shifting power relations. But it's unlikely that you will have ever seen anything quite like this production, which is being presented by the Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA's Freud Playhouse through Sunday.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2013 | By Matea Gold, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- The official Inaugural Ball served up a mixture of high and low culture Monday night: There was the first lady decked out in a custom Jason Wu ruby-colored chiffon-and-velvet gown. And there were the food tables, laden with oversized bowls of pretzels, salted nuts and bright orange Cheez-Its. The night felt a bit like a senior prom on steroids: Oversized colored globes and bunting were hung from the massive ducts lining the ceiling of the cavernous convention hall.
SPORTS
November 21, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
He sits on the second row. The moment he gave up the throne, he moved back to the second row. It suits him there. His journey makes sense from there. He is as close to the ushers as the superstars. He is midway between his deepest roots and wildest dreams. "I'm the guy you look at and say, 'Oh,' " said Bernie Bickerstaff, his gap-toothed smile widening. "You see me and say, 'Oh, him.' I'm the forgotten guy. I'm the guy who just does his job. " In a young Lakers season dominated by coaching narratives, the most compelling cannot be found along the beach with Phil Jackson, or on crutches with Mike D'Antoni, but in that second row, in the thick mountain drawl of the gray-haired man who traveled unimaginable miles to get there.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With his button eyes and potty mouth, not to mention his mean left hook, the teddy bear at the center of the hit comedy"Ted" is an unwholesome mess, but he's also resourceful, tough and - let's face it - magic. John, his "thunder buddy for life" and raison d'etre, is another story - an age-old story, at that. The mild and clueless underachiever (played with perfect purposelessness by Mark Wahlberg) is the latest in a long line of characters: nebbishes who are put through some sort of test with the questionable guidance of imaginary or fantastical friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
UNDERRATED Romany Malco : Maybe better known by one of the names on his Twitter bio ("The Black Guy From '40 Yr. Old Virgin'"), Malco should finally make a name for himself as a top-tier comic talent in "Think Like a Man," a new film with stand-up star Kevin Hart. Malco was a scene stealer in Showtime's "Weeds" and the aforementioned Apatow movie, but his Web-friendly turn as life coach Tijuana Jackson on "Funny or Die" helped take him to the next level. Playoff hockey : Regardless of whether the L.A. Kings continue their torrid pace or revert to the underdog No. 8 seed they are, few experiences in sports are as riveting as the NHL playoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Writer-director Richard Ayoade has the knack. A fresh and inventive cinematic voice, he's taken a subject that's been beaten half to death and brought it miraculously to life in his smart and funny debut feature, "Submarine. " Based on a novel by Joe Dunthorne, "Submarine" is not exactly the first film willing to explore the coming of age of a teenage boy. But by grafting delightful cinematic wit and style and a fondness for the energy of the French New Wave onto the tale of a 15-year-old taking on life in a town in Wales, Ayoade makes us feel like it's never been told before.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With his button eyes and potty mouth, not to mention his mean left hook, the teddy bear at the center of the hit comedy"Ted" is an unwholesome mess, but he's also resourceful, tough and - let's face it - magic. John, his "thunder buddy for life" and raison d'etre, is another story - an age-old story, at that. The mild and clueless underachiever (played with perfect purposelessness by Mark Wahlberg) is the latest in a long line of characters: nebbishes who are put through some sort of test with the questionable guidance of imaginary or fantastical friends.
SPORTS
February 25, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
From Tempe, Ariz. -- The coach once helped carry his son from tee ball to the top of the high school baseball world, never missing a game, cheering every moment, from midnight batting practice to driveway bullpen sessions to championship glory. Today, the coach gently places his son over his shoulder and carries him from his wheelchair to the front seat of his dusty truck. "We were never much for hugging," Dale Hahn says. "But now I get to hug my son all the time. " The coach once pushed the son to become California's Mr. Baseball, working on his swing, inspiring his hustle and watching him become a powerful outfielder with speed, smarts, a full scholarship to Arizona State and a major league future.
SPORTS
January 6, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
One win over Arizona, UCLA's best of the season, and Coach Ben Howland's voice was dual-toned Friday. Maybe even triple-toned. Definitely not the monotone that had marked his lifeless summations and conversations after the Bruins lost their opening two Pac-12 Conference games — one a nail biter, the other a run away — last weekend. A day after UCLA defeated Arizona, 65-58, for its first conference win, Howland punctuated his sentences with verbal high-fives. On his team's offensive execution, especially in shooting 57.1% in the first half when the Bruins used a 17-4 run to build a seven-point lead, Howland said his big men, most notably David and Travis Wear, did a good job of posting up and shooting.
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