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Life Expectancy

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NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In the United States and Europe, antiretroviral drugs have changed HIV infection from an early death sentence to a lifelong but manageable condition. Many international philanthropies have contended that these medications could do the same in poor countries, and have aggressively negotiated lower costs to put them within reach of those in the developing world, where HIV infection rates are highest. But given the challenges to health and hygiene in such countries, it's not been clear that antiretroviral therapy would reverse the shortened life expectancies of the HIV-infected there as they have in the developed world.
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WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
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SCIENCE
December 4, 2012 | Bettina Boxall
A new study links even small reductions in fine particle air pollution to increased life expectancy.   Researchers who compared data from 545 counties across the U.S., including many in California, found that a drop in fine particulate matter , known as PM2.5, between 2000 and 2007 corresponded with an average rise in life expectancy of 0.35 of a year. The study, led by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, is described as the largest to date to find public health benefits from ongoing reductions in U.S. air pollution levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
No matter how you spin it, divorce is a failure. It's a failure of intention. A failure of commitment. A failure of the very thing you promised to do when you wed, which is stay together for the rest of your life. But hey, Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin, if it makes you feel better to torture the language, have at it: Call your divorce after 11 years of marriage a “conscious uncoupling.” It's still a failure. Sure, it's easy to mock Paltrow and Martin (but mostly Paltrow)
NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Babies born in the United States in 2009 have a record life expectancy of about 78 years and 2 months. That's the latest from preliminary figures released Wednesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Life expectancy didn't rise all that much from 2008 -- just two-tenths of a year for men to 75.7 years and one-tenth of a year for women to 80.6 years. The National Vital Statistics Reports also show that white women have the highest life expectancy followed by black females, white males and black males.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Life expectancy is up in the United States. We know this because the headlines have been trumpeting the news floating around all week. So maybe it’s time for a closer look at what factors affect life expectancy -- and what you can do about it. The National Vital Statistics Reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points to these causes of death (no surprises if you've been keeping up on health news). Heart disease is the No. 1 cause (616,067) followed by cancer (562,875)
SCIENCE
June 5, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
The gap in life expectancy between black and white Americans is smaller than it has ever been, thanks largely to a decline in the number of deaths resulting from heart disease and HIV infection, a new analysis has found. That's the good news. The bad news is that the gap is still large: A black baby boy born today can expect to live 5.4 fewer years, on average, than his white counterpart, and a black baby girl will die 3.7 years earlier, on average, than her white counterpart. What's more, the narrowing of the gap between 2003 and 2008 is due in part to a troubling development among whites: They are more likely than in the past to die from overdoses of powerful prescription medications like OxyContin and Vicodin, along with other unintentional poisonings.
WORLD
July 8, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Life expectancy is 5.5 years lower in northern China than in the south because of heavy air pollution, a study examining 20 years of data concludes. The research -- published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by four economists in China, the United States and Israel - examined air quality readings collected in 90 Chinese cities from 1981 to 2000, and compared them with mortality data collected from 145 locations from 1991 to 2000. Other studies have established strong correlations between air pollution and poor health and attempted to quantify the resulting loss of life in China.
WORLD
May 22, 2009
Girls born in Japan today are likely to live until 2095, some with a good chance of seeing the dawn of the next century thanks to having the world's longest life expectancy, the World Health Organization reported from Geneva on Thursday. The tiny nation of San Marino boasts the longest average life span for men, at 81 years. The United States lags behind the top nations, with an average life expectancy of 78 for the two sexes combined.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Life expectancy has risen in the United States over the last 25 years, but it's not rising as fast as it once was. And, compared with other developed nations, U.S. life expectancy doesn't measure up. In a report released Tuesday by the National Research Council , experts describe U.S. life expectancy as a "poor performance" compared with many other countries given the fact that the U.S. spends far more on healthcare than any other nation....
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
People who expect to live into their 70s and 80s are likelier than previous generations to delay retirement, according to a new study. Americans who think they'll live to at least 75 are more apt to remain in the workforce compared to those in the past with shorter expected lifespans, according to the report by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. There is “a statistically significant relationship between an individual's subjective life expectancy and his expectations of when he'll retire,” according to the study.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Poorer Americans suffered bigger blows than richer ones as the housing market fizzled during the Great Recession, causing wealth inequality to surge for the first time since the 1980s, a new report finds. During the recession, tumbling values in the housing market “increased wealth inequality because houses are the main asset of less advantaged groups,” reported the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. Unlike the very rich, who held more of their wealth in stocks or businesses, poor and middle-class Americans banked more heavily on housing.
SCIENCE
November 5, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Clinical depression is now the second-leading cause of global disability, according to new research, with the highest rates of incidence affecting working-age adults and women more than men. In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Plos Medicine, researchers found that depressive disorders were second only to lower respiratory infections when it came to inflicting the most years of disability on people throughout the world. Rates of depression were highest in Afghanistan and lowest in Japan, while the condition ranked as the top cause of disability in Central America and Central and Southeast Asia.
OPINION
November 3, 2013
Re "Afghan projects may lose oversight," Oct. 30 The article overlooks Afghanistan's development progress as it breezes over USAID's rigorous oversight of our projects worldwide. In the last 10 years, Afghans have seen a 20-year increase in life expectancy and a 62% decrease in child mortality. A decade ago, female education was banned in Afghanistan. Now, almost 3 million girls attend school. Americans can be proud of their contribution to those achievements. Furthermore, allegations of widespread waste and mismanagement are unfounded.
WORLD
July 8, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Life expectancy is 5.5 years lower in northern China than in the south because of heavy air pollution, a new study examining 20 years of data has determined. The research, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by four economists in China, the U.S. and Israel, examined air quality readings collected in 90 Chinese cities from 1981 to 2000 and compared those with mortality data collected at 145 locations across the country from 1991 to 2000.
WORLD
July 8, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Life expectancy is 5.5 years lower in northern China than in the south because of heavy air pollution, a study examining 20 years of data concludes. The research -- published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by four economists in China, the United States and Israel - examined air quality readings collected in 90 Chinese cities from 1981 to 2000, and compared them with mortality data collected from 145 locations from 1991 to 2000. Other studies have established strong correlations between air pollution and poor health and attempted to quantify the resulting loss of life in China.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | Associated Press
The life expectancy of Mexicans has grown from 64 years to 67 years, Health Secretary Guillermo Soberon Acevedo reported.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. simply isn't keeping up with the rest of the developed world in life expectancy, new research revealed this week. And women in particular are backsliding, a trend attributed in part to obesity and smoking. But the devil is in the details. Some counties are keeping pace, while others have life expectancies similar to those of Honduras and El Salvador (i.e., not great). Between 2000 and 2007, more than 80% of U.S. counties have slipped in standing against what researchers term the international frontier: the life expectancy of the 10 nations with the lowest mortality.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
I'd like to offer my thanks to House Budget Committee Chairman Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) for doing so much to validate my list of the five biggest lies about "entitlement" programs published on Sunday. Ryan's proposed federal budget , released Tuesday, uses four of them. As a dividend, he exploits a few that I didn't mention. The ones from my list are: He uses the thoroughly discredited "infinite horizon" projection to claim that Social Security and Medicare are "tens of trillions" of dollars in the hole; he suggests that retirees aren't paying their fair share for their benefits; he suggests that the programs are hammered by benefits going to the wealthy; and he treats Medicare and Social Security as though they're similar programs with similar issues.
OPINION
March 5, 2013
Re "Execution coverage decried," March 2 Have we gone so far in having sympathy for murderers that we have forgotten the purpose of all criminal penalties? It is deterrence. No one should think they can take the life of another and keep theirs. Televising the reality - as was done in China - that when those men walked behind that door they would be put to death will, at the very least, give pause to would-be killers and increase the life expectancy of the rest of us who have no inclination to murder anyone.
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