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Life Expectancy

SCIENCE
February 21, 2013 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
An intensive campaign to combat HIV/AIDS with costly antiretroviral drugs in rural South Africa has increased life expectancy by more than 11 years and significantly reduced the risk of infection for healthy individuals, according to new research. The two studies, published Thursday in the journal Science, come as wealthy Western nations are debating how best to stretch limited AIDS funding at a time of economic stress. With an annual price tag of $500 to $900 per patient, antiretroviral therapy programs have stirred frequent debate.
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NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
At midlife, the nation's 78 million baby boomers appear to be in worse health than the generation that preceded them, a new study finds . Researchers from West Virginia University School of Medicine and the Medical University of South Carolina knew that American's life expectancy has steadily improved, but they wondered whether that meant baby boomers were healthier than their parents or simply benefiting from better medical treatments....
OPINION
January 12, 2013
For all of our sophisticated medical care, Americans can expect shorter lives and more health troubles than the people of other well-off nations, according to a new report. And that's not just true of infants and poor people, the groups usually pinpointed as particularly vulnerable to health issues; it is also the case for the affluent, teenagers and middle-aged people. Some of this can be traced to a lack of preventive and primary care, some to car accidents and violence, some to obesity and poor health habits.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Americans live shorter lives -- and are in generally worse health -- than citizens of other wealthy nations, according to an extensive report released Wednesday by the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. The analysis of international health data, available here , determined that American men had the lowest life expectancy among men in 17 countries, including wealthy European nations, Australia, Canada and Japan. U.S. women had the second-lowest life expectancy (only Danish women fared worse.)
SCIENCE
December 4, 2012 | Bettina Boxall
A new study links even small reductions in fine particle air pollution to increased life expectancy.   Researchers who compared data from 545 counties across the U.S., including many in California, found that a drop in fine particulate matter , known as PM2.5, between 2000 and 2007 corresponded with an average rise in life expectancy of 0.35 of a year. The study, led by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, is described as the largest to date to find public health benefits from ongoing reductions in U.S. air pollution levels.
SCIENCE
November 7, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
So, what's it worth to lace up those sneakers and break a sweat for about 30 minutes a day? About 3.5 extra years of life, on average - and about 4.2 additional years for those willing to step up the intensity or put in closer to an hour a day of brisk walking or its equivalent, according to a new study. Even for the severely obese - those with a body mass index above 35 - exercising for about 2.5 hours a week at moderate intensity or for 75 minutes at vigorous levels puts average life expectancy a notch above that of a normal-weight person who is sedentary, the research shows.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Modern humans have gotten incomparably good at survival, doing more to extend our lives over the last century than our forebears did in the previous 6.6 million years since we parted evolutionary ways with chimpanzees, according to a new study. In fact, humans in societies with plentiful food and advanced medicine have surpassed other species used in life-extending medical research in stretching our longevity and reducing our odds of dying at every point along our ever-lengthening life spans, the study finds.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: My sister and I are in the middle of distributing our parents' estate. The beneficiary of the estate is a trust. Part of the estate consists of a traditional IRA, which will be split between my sister and me. The problem is that because the IRA will be distributed from the trust and is considered a non-spouse distribution, I'm told that we'll have to pay taxes on the entire distribution. It's a good chunk of change. I'm almost 60. Is there any way that I can roll the IRA into my own and take minimum distributions?
NATIONAL
June 18, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Jack Osbourne has revealed that he has multiple sclerosis, an incurable and unpredictable disease that attacks the central nervous system. The offspring of rocker Ozzy Osbourne and "America's Got Talent" judge Sharon Osbourne said the diagnosis came just as life was soaring with new joys. Osbourne, 26, and his fiancee recently welcomed a baby girl, Pearl. "While I was waiting for the final results, I got really, really angry," he told Hello! magazine. "Then I got really sad for about two days, and after that I realized: Being angry and upset is not going to do anything at this point, if anything it's only going to make it worse ...  'adapt and overcome' is my new motto.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
The gap in life expectancy between black and white Americans is smaller than it has ever been, thanks largely to a decline in the number of deaths resulting from heart disease and HIV infection, a new analysis has found. That's the good news. The bad news is that the gap is still large: A black baby boy born today can expect to live 5.4 fewer years, on average, than his white counterpart, and a black baby girl will die 3.7 years earlier, on average, than her white counterpart. What's more, the narrowing of the gap between 2003 and 2008 is due in part to a troubling development among whites: They are more likely than in the past to die from overdoses of powerful prescription medications like OxyContin and Vicodin, along with other unintentional poisonings.
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