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Life Magazine

MAGAZINE
May 21, 1989 | JACK SMITH
HERE HAS been much speculation on the meaning of life. Why are we here? Mostly the answers are those of theologians, philosophers, physicists and others who are thought to have some special pipeline to the eternal mysteries. But all of us wonder why we are here. It is a question that occurs to little boys and girls playing with their toys; to college students; to plumbers, teachers, U.S. senators, nurses, soldiers, the homeless, ship captains and chief executive officers. Their answers are rarely found in Bartlett's or any other compilation of quotations; yet the wisest men admit that the answer is beyond philosophy and science.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2007
I mourn the passing of the Life magazine I knew in the middle decades of the last century. I contest, however, that its death was, as Tim Rutten supposed, inevitable ["Life as We Knew It," March 28]. Notwithstanding the ubiquity of digital cameras and photo-capable cellphones, I cannot imagine that "popular tastes in media" have changed so much that a well-edited collection of dramatic and insightful photographs is no longer worth publishing. I blame the editors of Life for killing it, and offer as evidence their "Picture of the Week."
NEWS
February 28, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A friend who just spent a week at the New Yorker, now celebrating its 75th anniversary, shares the following story about recent meetings in the magazine's Times Square offices several days before a new issue was put to bed: "What do you think?" asks editor David Remnick, frowning at a scribbled list of essays, short stories and nonfiction pieces. "I don't know," sighs executive editor Dorothy Wickenden, her face showing the pressures of a difficult week. "Somehow the mix here is not . . .
NEWS
January 28, 2000
America was in mourning on April 12, 1945. Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the country's only four-term president, who had led a shattered people through the impossible days of the Depression and through most of the Second World War, had just died of a massive cerebral hemorrhage. Ed Clark, a Life magazine photographer, drove all night from his home in Nashville to Roosevelt's summer residence in Warm Springs, Ga., to cover the news.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1999 | DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a week of nonstop television coverage, it is the magazine industry's turn to seize on the nation's ongoing mourning of John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bessette Kennedy. Publishers regard the couple's death as the biggest event of the year and as an opportunity to sell additional magazines on a scale not seen since Princess Diana's tragic death two years ago. Kennedy has made the covers of Time and Newsweek the last two weeks, in addition to the current covers of People, TV Guide, U.S.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When Bob Greene went home to visit his folks in Columbus, Ohio, last Christmas, his mother ordered him down to the basement. She sent him there with a mission: to rummage through several boxes of belongings that the columnist for the Chicago Tribune and Esquire magazine had tucked away years ago. There, sandwiched between some junior high school report cards, Greene found a copy of Life magazine dated Nov. 29, 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1991 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Meaning of Life" (at 10 tonight on CBS, Channels 2 and 8) is a television version of what Life magazine has been reduced to: a special-edition, coffee-table smorgasbord of celebrities and common folk, of homilies and pithy expressions about, in this case, the meaning of it all. Only at the end of the year, when our emotions turn a bit mushy, can prime time indulge such a show. If you've ever wondered what software really means, this is it.
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