Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLife Magazine
IN THE NEWS

Life Magazine

NEWS
December 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Vi Murphy, a veteran newswoman who was one of the first journalists jailed for refusing to reveal a source, has died of cancer. She was 63. Mrs. Murphy, who recently lived in San Diego, died Sunday at Bakersfield Memorial Hospital, where she had been undergoing treatment for lymphoma cancer, her daughter, Susan Murphy, said Monday. Mrs. Murphy was a newspaper reporter for 30 years, beginning her career in Colorado.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2007
I mourn the passing of the Life magazine I knew in the middle decades of the last century. I contest, however, that its death was, as Tim Rutten supposed, inevitable ["Life as We Knew It," March 28]. Notwithstanding the ubiquity of digital cameras and photo-capable cellphones, I cannot imagine that "popular tastes in media" have changed so much that a well-edited collection of dramatic and insightful photographs is no longer worth publishing. I blame the editors of Life for killing it, and offer as evidence their "Picture of the Week."
NEWS
November 7, 1985 | AL MARTINEZ
It is axiomatic in this business that whenever one writes about an especially emotional issue, he is bound to emerge not as a hero of those whose opinion he seems to favor, but as an enemy of anyone who has an opinion. This is not true in matters of war, politics, capital punishment, poverty, child abuse or disease, since no one on the Westside really pays much attention to subjects that cannot be discussed at cocktail parties.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS
Trenchcoat (Channel 5 Sunday at 6 p.m.) is an anemic 1983 mystery-comedy from Disney with a caper plot involving fledgling mystery writer Margot Kidder, who is the sole reason for sitting through this disappointment. With that grand gargle of a voice, she manages to be absolutely lovable as she suffers through the film's absurdities with vigor and elan. In his sleek and scary 1981 Wolfen (Channel 13 Sunday at 6 p.m.), director Michael Wadleigh keeps us mystified right up to a jolting finish.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When Bob Greene went home to visit his folks in Columbus, Ohio, last Christmas, his mother ordered him down to the basement. She sent him there with a mission: to rummage through several boxes of belongings that the columnist for the Chicago Tribune and Esquire magazine had tucked away years ago. There, sandwiched between some junior high school report cards, Greene found a copy of Life magazine dated Nov. 29, 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dean Zanuck, 37, a third-generation scion of the Hollywood producing dynasty, strikes out on his own with the quirky "Get Low," the first film from his new company, Zanuck Independent. Directed by first-time feature film director Aaron Schneider, who won an Oscar for his short "Two Soldiers," the movie opens Friday in L.A. and New York. How did "Get Low" come about? It came about a decade ago. My wife was showing houses to a young lit manager and I got to know him, and he told me this story he was working on with his writer client.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|