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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence served "Life" over the weekend and sentenced "The Matrix" to second place while posting the second-best-ever opening for a film in April. The prison comedy-drama escaped with generally good reviews and went over the wall at the weekend box office, making off with an estimated $20.7 million on 2,594 screens and bringing Universal Pictures its first ray of sunshine since "Patch Adams."
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2012
The Lantern House, used as a single-family compound but legally a trio of cottages, has become a Venice landmark over the years. The funky vibed, colorful dwelling is being offered fully furnished, including the larger-than-life movie props, artwork and fountains. Location: 745 Milwood Ave., Venice 90291 Asking price: $5.4 million Year built: 1923 Last sold: 1988, for $232,000 Cottage sizes: Unit 1: one bedroom, one bathroom; Unit 2: one bedroom, one bathroom; Unit 3: one bedroom, one half-bath Lot size: 5,399 square feet Features: Den/office, dining room, living room, eat-in kitchen, vaulted ceilings, skylights, French doors, five fireplaces, lantern-filled trees, extensive decking, outdoor dining room, lighted deck stair risers, decorative wrought-iron gates, outdoor bathtub About the area: In the third quarter, 59 single-family homes sold in the 90291 ZIP Code at a median price of $1 million, according to DataQuick.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2010 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The ninth floor of the Universal Sheraton in Universal City was in disarray as a film crew raced to ready the setting, with only two minutes until star Dominic Monaghan was scheduled to arrive. As one crew member rushed to tape the sprawling cables to the multicolored carpet, another struggled to light the small hallway as hotel guests floated by unfazed. Just another day in Hollywood. But not for this crew. They were all teenagers. While most adolescents would rather spend spring break lounging at a pool -- the hotel windows gave a perfect glimpse of one below -- these teens spent theirs getting a crash course in filmmaking by spending a week shooting two short films all over Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2010 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The ninth floor of the Universal Sheraton in Universal City was in disarray as a film crew raced to ready the setting, with only two minutes until star Dominic Monaghan was scheduled to arrive. As one crew member rushed to tape the sprawling cables to the multicolored carpet, another struggled to light the small hallway as hotel guests floated by unfazed. Just another day in Hollywood. But not for this crew. They were all teenagers. While most adolescents would rather spend spring break lounging at a pool -- the hotel windows gave a perfect glimpse of one below -- these teens spent theirs getting a crash course in filmmaking by spending a week shooting two short films all over Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Director George Stevens might not seem the most gripping subject for biography. Taciturn, seemingly impassive (he never denied rumors--utterly unfounded--that he came from one or another tribe of American Indians), he was content to let his films carry the drama in his life. Yet through the compassion and the film-making skills of his son, George Stevens Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Sheri Linden
In the fashionably medieval-tinged fantasy adventure "Inkheart," contemporary people known as Silvertongues bring literary characters to life simply by reading aloud from the pages in which they exist. One of the drawbacks to this unasked-for abracadabra -- and there are several -- is that the transformation requires an exchange: For every fictional person or animal or thing that crosses into the here and now, an innocent flesh-and-blood bystander gets whooshed into the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joan Plowright and Laurence Olivier met in the cast of "The Entertainer" at London's Royal Court Theatre in 1956. They re-created their roles in the film version released in 1960. (Far from Shakespeare, it may nevertheless be Olivier's finest screen performance.) They were married in Connecticut in 1961, while starring on Broadway, he in "Becket" and she in "A Taste of Honey," for which she won a Tony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tearful Erin Brockovich testified Thursday that she was incensed to learn that her ex-husband and ex-boyfriend were threatening to tell the tabloids that she neglected her three children. "It has been a difficult task raising children with an absent father and no child support," the real-life movie heroine told a Ventura courtroom. "The one thing I have been is a good mom to my kids," she said, wiping her eyes.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Lights, camera ... rolling! On a movie tour, that is. By bus or on foot, visits to spots where films and TV shows were shot get top billing from many tourist bureaus. Travelers can gawk at the lagoon where Elvis Presley crooned in "Blue Hawaii," get lost in the Monterey, Calif., fog of Clint Eastwood's thriller "Play Misty for Me" and shop where "Sex and the City's" Carrie Bradshaw exercised her credit cards. It's a growth business.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1994 | ALLEN BARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Christmas, the movie industry gave the public films about AIDS, concentration camps, escaped convicts and men sentenced to life imprisonment. The public--or a sizable portion of it, anyway--decided it wanted a Western, and "Tombstone," the surprise hit of the winter, was launched. At the time of its Christmas Day release, the chances for "Tombstone," the latest version of the escapades of Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday, seemed about as good as the Clantons at the O.K. Corral.
SPORTS
November 28, 2009 | By David Wharton
Bruins and Trojans, outside the lines Turnover margin and total yards aren't the only numbers you can use to compare USC and UCLA for the big game at the Coliseum today. Try measuring the box office receipts of Trojans alumnus Will Ferrell versus UCLA grad Jack Black. Or the voting records of Rep. Diane Watson (D-Los Angeles) of UCLA versus Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach) of USC. Whether it's entertainment, politics or big business, alumni from both schools play a big role in Southern California life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Sheri Linden
In the fashionably medieval-tinged fantasy adventure "Inkheart," contemporary people known as Silvertongues bring literary characters to life simply by reading aloud from the pages in which they exist. One of the drawbacks to this unasked-for abracadabra -- and there are several -- is that the transformation requires an exchange: For every fictional person or animal or thing that crosses into the here and now, an innocent flesh-and-blood bystander gets whooshed into the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2008 | Robert Hilburn, Hilburn is a freelance writer.
Just as Joaquin Phoenix did a marvelous job capturing the music and spirit of Johnny Cash in the film "Walk the Line," Jeffrey Wright delivers a knockout portrayal of bluesman Muddy Waters in the recently released period drama "Cadillac Records." The actor's vocal dynamics are so striking on songs "I'm a Man" and "(I'm Your) Hoochie Coochie Man" that he alone is almost enough to make a winner out of the film's soundtrack, but he doesn't get enough help from his supporting cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2008 | Liz Brown, Special to The Times
For the last several years, Richard Schickel has been a regular contributor to the Los Angeles Times Book Review, writing primarily about books on film. His new book, "Film on Paper: The Inner Life of Movies," is a collection of many of those articles, as well as other pieces that appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Atlantic and elsewhere. Schickel, the film critic for Time magazine since 1972, has written some 30 books, most recently a biography of Elia Kazan.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Lights, camera ... rolling! On a movie tour, that is. By bus or on foot, visits to spots where films and TV shows were shot get top billing from many tourist bureaus. Travelers can gawk at the lagoon where Elvis Presley crooned in "Blue Hawaii," get lost in the Monterey, Calif., fog of Clint Eastwood's thriller "Play Misty for Me" and shop where "Sex and the City's" Carrie Bradshaw exercised her credit cards. It's a growth business.
BOOKS
October 12, 2003 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author most recently of "Woody Allen: A Life in Film." His latest documentary film is "Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin."
One of the best movie critic-historians we have is J. (for James) Hoberman. He has a syncretic sense of the past and a shrewd sense of the many ways it affects the present. He is an excellent analyst of individual works, with a keen eye for telling details and a thoughtful way of locating them in the overall context of a career or the zeitgeist of their moment. And he writes well -- a clear, sober prose that presents his judgments in a muted, but never muddy, manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1995 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney's classic 1961 animated film "101 Dalmatians," a tale about the abduction of Dalmatian puppies by the arch-villain Cruella De Vil, will be made into a live-action movie for release at Thanksgiving in 1996, Disney Studios Chairman Joe Roth said Tuesday.
BOOKS
October 12, 2003 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author most recently of "Woody Allen: A Life in Film." His latest documentary film is "Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin."
One of the best movie critic-historians we have is J. (for James) Hoberman. He has a syncretic sense of the past and a shrewd sense of the many ways it affects the present. He is an excellent analyst of individual works, with a keen eye for telling details and a thoughtful way of locating them in the overall context of a career or the zeitgeist of their moment. And he writes well -- a clear, sober prose that presents his judgments in a muted, but never muddy, manner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tearful Erin Brockovich testified Thursday that she was incensed to learn that her ex-husband and ex-boyfriend were threatening to tell the tabloids that she neglected her three children. "It has been a difficult task raising children with an absent father and no child support," the real-life movie heroine told a Ventura courtroom. "The one thing I have been is a good mom to my kids," she said, wiping her eyes.
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