Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLifetime Ban
IN THE NEWS

Lifetime Ban

SPORTS
March 18, 2000 | Associated Press
Donald Brashear says Marty McSorley should never be allowed to play in the NHL again for the stick attack that gave the Vancouver Canuck forward a serious concussion. "He really tried to injure me," Brashear told the NHL Players' Assn. TV show "Be A Player," which aired in Canada on Friday. "I could have died. I don't think this guy should be playing in the league anymore," Brashear added in his first extensive remarks on the Feb. 21 attack by the Boston Bruin defenseman.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 20, 1998 | DAVID CRARY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Even after 10 years, he still would have held the title of fastest man in the world. And now Ben Johnson is trying reclaim what he says he never should have lost. The muscle-bound blur busted for using steroids at the Seoul Olympics is ready to return to the track at age 36. "It kind of feels sad to think how fast I could have gone," he said. He did go fast, anyway, amazingly fast, blowing past Carl Lewis in the 100 meters for a gold medal and world record of 9.79 at the 1988 Games.
SPORTS
May 26, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ireland's triple Olympic swimming champion Michelle de Bruin faces an uphill battle to save her career after the sport's governing body announced Monday that a random urine sample had been altered. In a statement from its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland, FINA said a second test on a urine sample from de Bruin tested in a Barcelona laboratory last Thursday confirmed the likelihood of tampering. "These results indicate suspicion of physical manipulation," FINA said.
SPORTS
May 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
In another sign Pete Rose has little chance for reinstatement, acting Commissioner Bud Selig said Thursday that baseball stands by the lifetime ban imposed on the career hits leader. Selig, speaking at the City Club in Boise, was asked about the petition for reinstatement Rose filed last Sept. 26. At the conclusion of baseball's gambling investigation in 1989, the 17-time all-star agreed that Aug. 23 to accept a lifetime ban. "There is nothing that has changed that agreement.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | GEORGE SKELTON
Some things don't change. Americans have been arguing about term limits since the founding fathers began shaping the republic. James Madison wanted House members to serve one term and then go home. Otherwise, he feared, politicians and power blocs would become entrenched. He believed term limits were needed to make sure that congressmen represented the people, not "factions . . . the mortal diseases under which popular governments have everywhere perished." Alexander Hamilton, however, argued that if elected officials were denied the right to seek reelection, they would spend their time serving themselves and angling for the next job. "There would be a diminution of the inducements to good behavior," he wrote, because "the desire of reward is one of the strongest incentives of human conduct."
SPORTS
September 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
Even if Pete Rose applies for reinstatement, baseball officials said Thursday they are in no hurry to consider lifting his lifetime ban. Rose's lawyer, Gary Spicer, met with Robert DuPuy, the lawyer for acting Commissioner Bud Selig, and discussed the process baseball's career hits leader would need to follow if he wishes to lift the permanent suspension Rose agreed to in August 1989. That penalty is preventing Rose from appearing on the Hall of Fame ballot.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1997 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversial mortgage lender Preferred Credit Corp. agreed Thursday to pay a $1-million fine and its president agreed to a lifetime ban from the industry to settle a fraud lawsuit brought by state regulators. The state Department of Corporations said that Irvine-based Preferred also agreed to the appointment of a loan monitor to ensure that borrowers have been repaid at least $1.4 million in excessive interest payments. Preferred and its 29-year-old founder and chief executive, Todd A.
SPORTS
July 3, 1997 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
The final judge and jury in the Mike Tyson case will not be five people you've never heard of from the Nevada State Athletic Commission. Oh, they'll make a call, all right. Some length of suspension, some cash out of Tyson's pocket. We'll know the details soon, maybe next week. But even if those details include a lifetime suspension, expect it to be like one of those lifetime suspensions in track and field.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Oakland struck down California's term limits law Wednesday, ruling that the 1990 initiative that has transformed state politics violates the U.S. Constitution by denying voters the right to vote for experienced incumbents. U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken focused her ruling on a single provision of the initiative, one that bans veteran lawmakers for life from seeking reelection once they have served their terms and are forced from office.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|