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Light Emitting Diode

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Replacing old traffic lights with energy-saving light emitting diode traffic signals, known as LEDs, has earned the city a $507,500 rebate, officials said Tuesday. As part of a program established by the state Public Utilities Commission that encourages the replacement of incandescent traffic lamps, Southern California Edison presented a check to Huntington Beach. where The City Council approved funding in March to buy 4,800 LEDs.
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BUSINESS
May 9, 2010 | By Zohreen Adamjee, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Pervaiz Lodhie, 66, is the founder and chief executive of LEDtronics, a manufacturer of LED (light-emitting diode) bulbs. LEDs burn cooler, use significantly less energy and last tens of thousands of hours longer than traditional incandescents. Lodhie's LEDs can be found in spacecraft, robots, traffic lights and other products in which reliability is crucial. His clients include Northrop Grumman Corp., IBM Corp. and Caterpillar Inc. More than 300 employees work at the privately held firm, which is headquartered in Torrance and has an additional plant in Pakistan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The energy crisis couldn't do it. It's taking something called indium gallium nitride to give Los Angeles-area motorists the green light for conservation. That's the tongue-twisting name of the material that is finally letting engineers retrofit traffic signals throughout Southern California with electricity-saving light-emitting diode lamps.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2009 | Marla Dickerson
It's the green economy, stupid. It was hard not to think of this twist on his long-ago campaign slogan as former President Clinton toured the Los Angeles area on Monday, making the case that the quickest way out of the country's latest economic morass lies in the wonky topic of energy efficiency.
AUTOS
February 25, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, are almost as old as transistors. But technological advances in recent years have paved the way for a new generation of high-powered LED headlamps that will change auto styling and possibly improve safety. Lumileds Lighting, a Silicon Valley firm that has pioneered high-intensity LEDs, announced last month that it would provide LEDs for daytime-running lights in the new Audi A8.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2010 | By Zohreen Adamjee, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Pervaiz Lodhie, 66, is the founder and chief executive of LEDtronics, a manufacturer of LED (light-emitting diode) bulbs. LEDs burn cooler, use significantly less energy and last tens of thousands of hours longer than traditional incandescents. Lodhie's LEDs can be found in spacecraft, robots, traffic lights and other products in which reliability is crucial. His clients include Northrop Grumman Corp., IBM Corp. and Caterpillar Inc. More than 300 employees work at the privately held firm, which is headquartered in Torrance and has an additional plant in Pakistan.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2002 | From Reuters
Two British companies announced plans early today to merge to become a world leader in the technology of so-called glowing plastics. Cambridge Display Technology announced the acquisition of the research activities of rival Opsys, giving it control of another major method to create organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Financial details were not disclosed. The two closely held companies sell their know-how to major electronics manufacturers, such as Seiko Epson Corp., Philips, DuPont Co.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2009 | Marla Dickerson
It's the green economy, stupid. It was hard not to think of this twist on his long-ago campaign slogan as former President Clinton toured the Los Angeles area on Monday, making the case that the quickest way out of the country's latest economic morass lies in the wonky topic of energy efficiency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've always had the run of the streets, dictating who should stay and who can go. The authority of the traffic light is rarely questioned--but who knew they were quite so power-hungry? In fact, a standard traffic light run by an incandescent bulb gobbles up 10 times more electricity than longer-lasting devices called light-emitting diodes, best known as those tiny red lights that alert people that their stereos are on.
SCIENCE
December 21, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA's Galileo spacecraft has begun transmitting data again after strong radiation near Jupiter had left its tape recorder inoperable for weeks. Galileo's flight team traced the problem to a light-emitting diode and completed a long-distance repair job. "We hope this will be the best data set that's ever been collected about the inner region of Jupiter's magnetic environment," said Dr. Torrence Johnson, Galileo project scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
AUTOS
February 25, 2004 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, are almost as old as transistors. But technological advances in recent years have paved the way for a new generation of high-powered LED headlamps that will change auto styling and possibly improve safety. Lumileds Lighting, a Silicon Valley firm that has pioneered high-intensity LEDs, announced last month that it would provide LEDs for daytime-running lights in the new Audi A8.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2002 | From Reuters
Two British companies announced plans early today to merge to become a world leader in the technology of so-called glowing plastics. Cambridge Display Technology announced the acquisition of the research activities of rival Opsys, giving it control of another major method to create organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Financial details were not disclosed. The two closely held companies sell their know-how to major electronics manufacturers, such as Seiko Epson Corp., Philips, DuPont Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The energy crisis couldn't do it. It's taking something called indium gallium nitride to give Los Angeles-area motorists the green light for conservation. That's the tongue-twisting name of the material that is finally letting engineers retrofit traffic signals throughout Southern California with electricity-saving light-emitting diode lamps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Replacing old traffic lights with energy-saving light emitting diode traffic signals, known as LEDs, has earned the city a $507,500 rebate, officials said Tuesday. As part of a program established by the state Public Utilities Commission that encourages the replacement of incandescent traffic lamps, Southern California Edison presented a check to Huntington Beach. where The City Council approved funding in March to buy 4,800 LEDs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've always had the run of the streets, dictating who should stay and who can go. The authority of the traffic light is rarely questioned--but who knew they were quite so power-hungry? In fact, a standard traffic light run by an incandescent bulb gobbles up 10 times more electricity than longer-lasting devices called light-emitting diodes, best known as those tiny red lights that alert people that their stereos are on.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Eastman Kodak Co., the world's largest photography company, said it will make display screens for electronic devices next year, the first time it will produce parts intended for other manufacturers. The screens, called organic light-emitting diode displays, or OLED, are brighter, cheaper and thinner than the liquid-crystal displays used in most electronics.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
In January 2008, Sony introduced the first commercial OLED TV with a near-paper-thin display and jaw-dropping picture quality. Two problems: The screen was only 11 inches (measured diagonally) and the price was $2,500. It was the perfect paperweight for an executive making too much money. Finally, Sony could be getting some competition in organic light-emitting diode technology, but the details are sketchy. An executive with LG Display, Won Kim, said in an interview with OLED-Info.
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