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OPINION
December 27, 2012
Re “ Let there be dark ,” Opinion, Dec. 21 A year ago I had the privilege of being one of the first scientists to see the nighttime satellite images of Earth that Paul Bogard refers to. Viewing the lights from East Asia, which represent a quarter of the planet's population, I was deeply moved. What stood out was the darkness of North Korea. Scientists who study these images have found a strong correlation between darkness and poverty. Although I applaud efforts to reduce artificial light pollution, we should not forget the benefits of electric lighting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Saturday is the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in terms of daylight hours -- and perhaps a sun lover's nightmare and a stargazer's delight. Jack Fusco falls into the second category, and his time-lapse video above shows how fascinating the heavens can be. The more than 2,000 photos he took during the October Jasper Dark Sky Festival in Alberta, Canada , create an ethereal portrait of an area that ranks low in light pollution. That's distinctly different from New Jersey, where he began to experiment with photography by taking photos of the ocean at sunrise.
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NEWS
March 28, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A plan to reduce light pollution that threatens Arizona's astronomical observatories was voted down in a state House committee amid business opposition. "Of all the bills, I think this one would have the greatest positive impact on the state," its sponsor, Rep. Jeff Hatch-Miller (R-Paradise Valley), said.
OPINION
December 27, 2012
Re “ Let there be dark ,” Opinion, Dec. 21 A year ago I had the privilege of being one of the first scientists to see the nighttime satellite images of Earth that Paul Bogard refers to. Viewing the lights from East Asia, which represent a quarter of the planet's population, I was deeply moved. What stood out was the darkness of North Korea. Scientists who study these images have found a strong correlation between darkness and poverty. Although I applaud efforts to reduce artificial light pollution, we should not forget the benefits of electric lighting.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | From Washington Post
The Czech Republic has become the first country in the world to pass a law aimed at reducing light pollution, which has increasingly become a problem for astronomers trying to study the heavens. The law, which passed both houses of Parliament and was signed by President Vaclav Havel on Feb. 27, goes into effect June 1.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2009 | Janet Portman, Inman News
Question: All the apartment buildings around mine, including the giant construction site behind my building, have huge floodlights (without any sort of light shade) along the property perimeters. At night the ambient light in my unit is almost enough to read by. Keeping the shades drawn in the summer means that I get practically no fresh air. Are there any restrictions on the wattage of floodlights? Are there any requirements that the floodlights be shaded? Do I, as a renter, have any recourse?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | REGINA HONG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Critics have attacked the Hidden Creek Ranch project from just about every angle imaginable. Opponents of the housing and retail proposal, which could create up to 3,220 homes and increase the city's population by one-third, have blasted the project for potential traffic congestion, air pollution, possible ground contamination and urban sprawl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oceanside became the fifth city in San Diego County to mandate the use of low-pressure sodium lights as a way of protecting Palomar Mountain Observatory from light pollution when it adopted a light ordinance Wednesday to aid what one official called "the search for the secrets of the universe."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1985
When Don Mackey moved here to open up an automobile dealership, he upheld a tradition carried on by his business partners at 14 showrooms throughout the Southwest: He flew a massive, 700-square-foot American flag atop a 100-foot pole, illuminated by a glaring spotlight. Mackey spent $20,000 for the flag, and he intended it to be an attention-grabber. That it was, beyond his wildest expectations.
WORLD
August 20, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
For a quarter of a century, Kim Un-tae has found comfort in the red neon cross that sits atop the steeple of the Protestant church he founded here. For the 70-year-old holy man, the soft glow of the religious icon has always signified that his faith was open for anyone willing to enter the doors of his church. "It's like a coastal lighthouse for passing ships in the dark," Kim said. Yet critics say church crosses like Kim's are just another form of light pollution. Tens of thousands of churches dot South Korea, most with their own red neon crosses.
OPINION
December 21, 2012 | By Paul Bogard
When I was a child, I knew real darkness. At my family's cabin on a Minnesota lake, I knew woods so dark that my hands disappeared before my eyes. I knew night skies in which meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars. But now, when 8 of 10 children born in the United States will never know a sky dark enough for the Milky Way, I worry we are rapidly losing night's natural darkness before realizing its worth. This winter solstice, as we cheer the days' gradual movement back toward light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
At dusk, when this nighttime town flips on its klieg lights, Rob Lambert and Jim Gianoulakis go looking for darkness. These two graying stargazers want to establish an observatory in one of the most light-polluted places on the planet. For them, it's all about making the best of a bad situation: If the lights of Las Vegas unnaturally brighten the nighttime sky, well, just point your telescope in the other direction. "If you build a facility in a remote area with pristine night skies, you're probably going to be missing the people to come and utilize it," said Gianoulakis, president of the 150-member Las Vegas Astronomical Society, who recently inherited the post from Lambert.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Stargazers, get psyched: The Leonid meteor shower is expected to peak late Friday night and continue through the weekend. If you can find a clear, dark spot where the starry night sky is visible, you can expect to see as many as 15 to 20 shooting stars per hour.  The Leonid meteor shower takes place each November as the Earth passes through a ring of rocky debris left by the comet Tempel-Tuttle. The number of shooting stars we get to see down here is determined by what part of the comet's orbit we pass through on any given year.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
TV sets, laptops, iPads and iPhones are modern society's instruments for increased productivity, social connectedness and entertainment after a long day's work. Ironically, a new study published in Molecular Psychiatry shows that these devices also contribute to an increase of major depressive disorder. The 24-hour society made possible by the advent of the electric light bulb has come at a significant biological cost. Light at night disrupts the body's natural circadian rhythms and has been linked to breast cancer, heart disease  and obesity.
WORLD
August 20, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
For a quarter of a century, Kim Un-tae has found comfort in the red neon cross that sits atop the steeple of the Protestant church he founded here. For the 70-year-old holy man, the soft glow of the religious icon has always signified that his faith was open for anyone willing to enter the doors of his church. "It's like a coastal lighthouse for passing ships in the dark," Kim said. Yet critics say church crosses like Kim's are just another form of light pollution. Tens of thousands of churches dot South Korea, most with their own red neon crosses.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2010
POP MUSIC Fol Chen The cryptic Highland Park-based art-pop group continues its August residency at the Echo, with different special guests each Monday. This week, the San Diego noise-pop band Crocodiles and Light Pollution, psychedelic rockers from Chicago, will share the bill. The Echo, 1822 Sunset Blvd., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Free. (213) 413-8200. http://www.attheecho.com. MOVIES Two by Martin Scorsese Twenty years have passed since the iconic director released his sweeping gangster epic, "GoodFellas," starring Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta and Joe Pesci, which chronicles the bloody rise and fall of Henry Hill and his pals within the mob hierarchy.
OPINION
December 21, 2012 | By Paul Bogard
When I was a child, I knew real darkness. At my family's cabin on a Minnesota lake, I knew woods so dark that my hands disappeared before my eyes. I knew night skies in which meteors left smoky trails across sugary spreads of stars. But now, when 8 of 10 children born in the United States will never know a sky dark enough for the Milky Way, I worry we are rapidly losing night's natural darkness before realizing its worth. This winter solstice, as we cheer the days' gradual movement back toward light, let us also remember the irreplaceable value of darkness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2010 | By Colin Stutz, Los Angeles Times
The brilliant streaks of light above Mt. Pinos in the Los Padres National Forest late Thursday elicited "oohs" and "aahs" and applause from the audience of stargazers. The prediction that the Perseid meteor shower — August's annual show of shooting stars would peak Thursday night and into early Friday lured about 200 people to Mt. Pinos, Southern California's most celebrated arena for social stargazing and amateur astronomy. While casual viewers stretched out on reclining chairs and stared skyward, some more serious hobbyists organized a star party in the middle of a large conifer-lined parking lot, two miles east of the summit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2010 | By Colin Stutz, Los Angeles Times
The brilliant streaks of light above Mt. Pinos in the Los Padres National Forest late Thursday elicited "oohs" and "aahs" and applause from the audience of stargazers. The prediction that the Perseid meteor shower — August's annual show of shooting stars would peak Thursday night and into early Friday lured about 200 people to Mt. Pinos, Southern California's most celebrated arena for social stargazing and amateur astronomy. While casual viewers stretched out on reclining chairs and stared skyward, some more serious hobbyists organized a star party in the middle of a large conifer-lined parking lot, two miles east of the summit.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2009 | Janet Portman, Inman News
Question: All the apartment buildings around mine, including the giant construction site behind my building, have huge floodlights (without any sort of light shade) along the property perimeters. At night the ambient light in my unit is almost enough to read by. Keeping the shades drawn in the summer means that I get practically no fresh air. Are there any restrictions on the wattage of floodlights? Are there any requirements that the floodlights be shaded? Do I, as a renter, have any recourse?
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