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NEWS
April 3, 1994
A fine artist is a master manipulator of light, color, form and texture. Neon sculptor Michael Flechtner also needs the skills of a chemist, electrician and carpenter. The only trait his whimsical creations share with the universally familiar neon signs is their unearthly glow. "The truth is that neon is not always a sign," he chides. Nor must the artist's imagination stop with "that ubiquitous glowing cactus in a pot, palm tree, flamingo or telephone."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The extremely likable Tyler Labine, whose constitutional buoyancy has kept him bobbing back into view even as the ships beneath him ("Mad Love," "Sons of Tucson," "Animal Practice," the relatively long-lived - two seasons! - "Reaper") go one after another to the bottom, is now the star of "Deadbeat," a new paranormal stoner comedy on Hulu. He is, in that respect - to get a little inside for a sentence - the David Walton of Actors Who Are Regularly Compared to Jack Black, whom he resembles in shape, beardedness and a certain rockitude.
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NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"A Dangerous Method," the intellectually stimulating look at the formative days of psychoanalysis, presents Viggo Mortensen in a transformative performance as Sigmund Freud, Michael Fassbender as his restrained protégé and rival, Carl Jung, and a bold Keira Knightley as the patient-turned-practitioner who came between them. But it was almost a Julia Roberts movie. "I first heard of and was intrigued by the story of Sabina Spielrein in a book by Aldo Carotenuto, 'A Secret Symmetry,'" says screenwriter Christopher Hampton of the character played by Knightley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Robert Abele
As disarmingly bracing at times as the stunning Alberta mountains behind its love-frazzled characters, the romantic comedy "The Right Kind of Wrong" works often in spite of its willful eccentricities. Failed novelist turned dishwasher Leo (Ryan Kwanten) is an unwitting poster boy for marital disappointment thanks to his ex-wife's popular blog and book, "Why You Suck. " In rebounding, Leo decides feisty tour guide Colette (Sara Canning) is the woman of his dreams, despite the fact that he meets her on her wedding day. What follows is what you'd expect: a hapless dreamer's grand gestures, flabbergasted hand-wringing by the newlywed - whose bohemian mother (Catherine O'Hara)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1997 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, "Wimzie's House," the new weekday PBS series for preschoolers that began last week, doesn't look much different from other kids' shows, with its colorful, giggly Muppet-like puppets and music. It doesn't take long to notice what makes it a standout, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2007
ABC's "Pushing Daisies" is the story of a young man blessed/cursed with the gift of bringing people back from the dead with a mere touch (but only if he never touches them again). Told in high fairy-tale style, down to its narration by "Harry Potter" audio god, Jim Dale, with a candy-store color scheme and high-def characters (Swoosie Kurtz plays one-half of a former synchronized swim team and wears an eye patch), it's poised to be the critic's darling come fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1995 | T. H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A director must sort out several avenues of interpretation to make Australian playwright David Williamson's "Money & Friends" work. One is tone. Should it be a sitcom, treating its subject of greed versus friendship in a flippant manner, or should it be naturalistic, slightly dark, with its laughs floating along its outer edge? Second is the multilayered pattern of relationships. There are four couples, and their parameters have to be explicit and clear-cut.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2003 | Ronald Brownstein
Hopkinton, N.H. As the weather cooled here one afternoon late last week, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean's rhetoric against President Bush heated up. During his first two stops on a campaign swing through New Hampshire, Dean was forceful in substance but restrained in tone as he critiqued Bush's domestic and foreign agendas. At a medical center in Derry, where he began his day, Dean never raised his voice as he lamented the debt that Bush's tax cuts will impose on future generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2003 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
"These are the stones of my holy road," singer-songwriter Lizzie West told the audience Wednesday at the Mint, flashing a broad but slightly shy smile that reflected her music's blend of guilelessness and craft. The New York City-born guitarist, 29, followed a winding but time-tested path to her major-label debut, "Holy Road ... Freedom Songs." It collects the wisdom accumulated while seeking lessons on the road, a la such personal heroes as writer Jack Kerouac.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
FAIRFAX, Va. - Pressing his case that his Republican challenger is untrustworthy, President Obama diagnosed him with a case of "Romnesia" on Friday but pledged to stop it from spreading by reminding voters of Mitt Romney's past conservative positions. The jocular argument had a serious intent: convincing voters in this key state - particularly women - that Romney's effort to move from the positions he took in the GOP primaries to those with appeal to the more moderate general election audience represented "backtracking and sidestepping.
WORLD
June 10, 2012 | By Jung-yoon Choi, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL - Lee Seo-youn rehearses a dance routine she'll perform in a couple of hours in a TV studio. Slender, graceful and dressed in a form-fitting hot pink maxi-skirt, Lee looks like a South Korean celebrity. Appearances can be deceiving. As a regular panelist on South Korean television's "Eje Mannareo Gapnida," which airs on cable's Channel A, Lee is one of a dozen or so female North Korean defectors featured on the program. Part talk show and part talent show, the title translates as "Now On My Way to Meet You," a name that conveys the program's goal of raising awareness between average North and South Koreans.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"A Dangerous Method," the intellectually stimulating look at the formative days of psychoanalysis, presents Viggo Mortensen in a transformative performance as Sigmund Freud, Michael Fassbender as his restrained protégé and rival, Carl Jung, and a bold Keira Knightley as the patient-turned-practitioner who came between them. But it was almost a Julia Roberts movie. "I first heard of and was intrigued by the story of Sabina Spielrein in a book by Aldo Carotenuto, 'A Secret Symmetry,'" says screenwriter Christopher Hampton of the character played by Knightley.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When it's done right, as it is in "Young Adult," there is something absolutely mesmerizing about watching a train wreck unfold on screen. When the wreck in question is a narcissistic beauty played to scheming, sour, downward-spiraling perfection by Charlize Theron, cringing is definitely called for, but so is laughter. In fact that's exactly the reaction director Jason Reitman and writer Diablo Cody are going for. Paired up for the first time since their 2007 knockout punch "Juno," the two ironists have switched sides in a sense.
HOME & GARDEN
May 7, 2011 | Lisa Boone
When Candice Cain and John Lee went to remodel the kitchen in their 1916 Echo Park house, they knew that bigger would not necessarily be better. They didn't need the space doubled or a massive island added. They just needed their galley kitchen to function better as a galley kitchen. Despite a bank of windows, the space felt cramped, dark and gloomy, with vinyl flooring, pine cabinets and fake wood paneling on the walls. Some cabinets had been recycled from the living room of the couple's Craftsman home.
FOOD
March 10, 2011 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Keep the fat lady waiting in the wings. It's not over yet. Fine dining, I mean, and the new Royce at the Langham Huntington is proof. The Pasadena hotel could have chosen to turn the Dining Room where Craig Strong (and briefly, Michael Voltaggio) once reigned into a casual bistro, for example. Nothing doing. Instead, we have the Royce with Patina alum David Féau at the helm turning out seriously delicious food in a new dining room that has traded in its old-school fustiness for a bright new look.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The protest that would lead to a significant change in British law guaranteeing equal pay for women begins inauspiciously enough. It's a summery day in 1968 in the factory town of Dagenham, not far from London. The morning streets are filled with workers bicycling into the massive Ford Motors plant. Most of the facility is state-of-the art new, but the women are relegated to sewing car seat covers in an old sweatshop of the type that put the sweat in the shop. It's so hot they strip down to their bras (strictly utilitarian, no Victoria's Secret here)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19): You have the inclination to joke around. As long as you are aware that others are more sensitive and may not share your ideas about what is funny, you'll be fine. Taurus (April 20-May 20): Your positive outlook is attractive. You find more friends when you steer clear of those inclined to dwell on the negative. Gemini (May 21-June 21): Share your ideas. They may be silly, or they may be interesting, but they will open up the conversation.
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