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Lil Ed Williams

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1992 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's written all over his maniacal, snaggletoothed grin and elfin expression. It's ingrained in his simple but eloquent slide guitar playing, and his unpretentious, good-timey singing. Lil' Ed Williams is not your stock blues musician of the '90s. Williams, frontman of Lil' Ed and The Blues Imperials, who perform Friday night at the Rhythm Cafe, is a throwback to the golden age of Chicago blues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1992 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's written all over his maniacal, snaggletoothed grin and elfin expression. It's ingrained in his simple but eloquent slide guitar playing, and his unpretentious, good-timey singing. Lil' Ed Williams is not your stock blues musician of the '90s. Williams, frontman of Lil' Ed and The Blues Imperials, who perform Friday night at the Rhythm Cafe, is a throwback to the golden age of Chicago blues.
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NEWS
November 26, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA, Frank Messina is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition
As the story goes, Lil' Ed Williams' big break came in the recording studio at Alligator Records in his hometown of Chicago. Spotted at a local club by label chief Bruce Iglauer in 1985, Williams and his band, the Blues Imperials, had been invited to tape a few demo songs and had launched into their usual high-voltage, not-a-breath-between-tunes set. After eight numbers, Iglauer offered them a contract on the spot.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA, Frank Messina is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition
As the story goes, Lil' Ed Williams' big break came in the recording studio at Alligator Records in his hometown of Chicago. Spotted at a local club by label chief Bruce Iglauer in 1985, Williams and his band, the Blues Imperials, had been invited to tape a few demo songs and had launched into their usual high-voltage, not-a-breath-between-tunes set. After eight numbers, Iglauer offered them a contract on the spot.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT
As Koko Taylor walked offstage at the Strand in Redondo Beach on Saturday, many in the audience were shouting "Hail to the Queen." It was appropriate, because Taylor's performance had showed why she deserves the title "Queen of the Blues." Taylor is the headliner in the traveling Alligator Records Blues Festival, a celebration of the Chicago-based record label's 20th anniversary (which was actually last year).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
The improbable story of Lil' Ed Williams' discovery could have been stolen from a screenplay on the early days of the record business. Williams, the guitarist/singer who plays his first local dates this week, spent a decade playing in Chicago blues bars without making much money or career headway. The late bluesman J. B. Hutto--Williams' uncle, mentor and chief inspiration--had warned him that blues was a tough field to break into.
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