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Lili Singer

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NEWS
March 30, 1997 | DEBRA J. HOTALING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Today's topic: snails. "I can't kill them," admits Lili Singer, surveying her backyard. "I can't stand to hear them squish." Phyllis Benenson shakes her head. "I'm ruthless with snails," she says passionately. "I have no problem stepping on them. I cut tomato worms in half with scissors. . . ." Singer shudders. "I know, I know, you pick the snails up very carefully and take them across the street to the empty lot," Benenson says. "No, that was the grasshoppers." "Then what do you do with snails?
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NEWS
March 30, 1997 | DEBRA J. HOTALING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Today's topic: snails. "I can't kill them," admits Lili Singer, surveying her backyard. "I can't stand to hear them squish." Phyllis Benenson shakes her head. "I'm ruthless with snails," she says passionately. "I have no problem stepping on them. I cut tomato worms in half with scissors. . . ." Singer shudders. "I know, I know, you pick the snails up very carefully and take them across the street to the empty lot," Benenson says. "No, that was the grasshoppers." "Then what do you do with snails?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | SUSAN HEEGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not so long ago, Lili Singer was living a comfortable life doing work she loved. She was the host of "The Garden Show" on radio station KCRW-FM, writing a gardening column for a design magazine, teaching gardening and horticulture through UCLA Extension and consulting on homeowners' gardens throughout Los Angeles. Then a friend came to her with an idea. Why not start a gardening newsletter full of information geared to the climate and growing conditions of Southern California?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | SUSAN HEEGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not so long ago, Lili Singer was living a comfortable life doing work she loved. She was the host of "The Garden Show" on radio station KCRW-FM, writing a gardening column for a design magazine, teaching gardening and horticulture through UCLA Extension and consulting on homeowners' gardens throughout Los Angeles. Then a friend came to her with an idea. Why not start a gardening newsletter full of information geared to the climate and growing conditions of Southern California?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | SUSAN HEEGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not so long ago, Lili Singer was living a comfortable life doing work she loved. She was the host of "The Garden Show" on radio station KCRW-FM (89.9), writing a gardening column for a design magazine, teaching gardening and horticulture through UCLA Extension and consulting on homeowners' gardens throughout Los Angeles. Then a friend came to her with an idea. Why not start a gardening newsletter full of information geared to the climate and growing conditions of Southern California?
HOME & GARDEN
June 9, 2005
I was pleased to see the return of Lili Singer ["Clambering for Attention," May 12, and "The Hubbub Over Heucheras," June 2]. Her deep knowledge of plants and plant resources combined with her fresh writing style draw me into her articles. Nancy Pine Altadena
HOME & GARDEN
May 26, 2005
We look forward to articles written by Lili Singer. On May 5, Lili exceeded herself with a story on hummingbird gardens ["Yards Abuzz With Tiny Travelers"]. We will keep the article on file in order to encourage and to provide sustenance for our tiny travelers. John and Marjorie Francis San Dimas Letters are subject to editing. Please include phone number for verification.
HOME & GARDEN
May 26, 2005
Re "Clambering for Attention" [May 12]: Can you tell us where we might be able to find the plant that's pictured, the Mexican flame vine? The vine sounds fabulous, and the colors are what we are looking for. Bobbe Kahn Dana Point Editor's note: If finding the vine at a local nursery proves difficult, Lili Singer advises ordering online. She suggests www.kartuz.com/floweringvines.html; scroll down to Senecio confusus.
HOME & GARDEN
May 25, 2006 | -- Lili Singer
Last week the Home section looked at creative ways to landscape that awkward patch of ground between the sidewalk and the street. But what if you're not interested in an elaborate garden? What if you simply want a pretty, low-maintenance lawn alternative? Try a groundcover that thrives with little water. Best of all: no mowing. The following suggestions come from Alan Uchida, owner of Bellefontaine Nursery in Pasadena, (626) 796-0747. * -- Lili Singer
HOME & GARDEN
August 12, 2004 | Lili Singer
Give yourself over to dandelions. Let daffodils and poppies poke up through undulating grasses. A boring lawn or waste-filled roadside can become a meadow -- "a community of colour [sic] and animals ... a dynamic ever-changing tapestry," a zone of planned chaos where herbicides are never welcome. So says British garden master Christopher Lloyd in his latest tome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | SUSAN HEEGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not so long ago, Lili Singer was living a comfortable life doing work she loved. She was the host of "The Garden Show" on radio station KCRW-FM (89.9), writing a gardening column for a design magazine, teaching gardening and horticulture through UCLA Extension and consulting on homeowners' gardens throughout Los Angeles. Then a friend came to her with an idea. Why not start a gardening newsletter full of information geared to the climate and growing conditions of Southern California?
HOME & GARDEN
November 4, 2004 | Lili Singer
Don't jump. Most spiders are harmless. They're also helpful predators and talented artists. Post this handsome hexagonal frame in a quiet corner of the garden, and an eight-legged Picasso is sure to take up residence, spin an intricate web and trap its hapless prey -- right before your eyes. The sturdy wooden Garden Spider Web Frame ($11.95), intended for ages 4 and older, is almost a foot wide, with a recessed "spider hideaway" at the top.
HOME & GARDEN
August 17, 2006
THANKS to Lili Singer for her terrific article on Catalina Island's native plant restoration ("A Quiet Revolution on Catalina," Aug. 10). As she points out, many of Catalina's unique species or varieties of native plants have been planted in gardens for 100 years . I hope folks in Avalon start to appreciate the opportunities they have to connect with the deep and long history of the island they call home. KAY STEWART San Diego I enjoyed your thoughtful article about Catalina.
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