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Lillian Baker

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October 29, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lillian Baker, a controversial conservative author and lecturer who maintained that Japanese Americans were not incarcerated in concentration camps during World War II, has died. She was 75. Baker died Oct. 21 at her home in Gardena, said a spokesman for the Americans for Historical Accuracy, which Baker founded.
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NEWS
October 29, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lillian Baker, a controversial conservative author and lecturer who maintained that Japanese Americans were not incarcerated in concentration camps during World War II, has died. She was 75. Baker died Oct. 21 at her home in Gardena, said a spokesman for the Americans for Historical Accuracy, which Baker founded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1991
Our organization has been battling Lillian Baker and her followers for over a decade. When her facts and new-found truths have been refuted, she seems to discover new "facts." I believe Jones' statement "Baker and her disciples are well beyond argument" is sound advice to not listen to her hate group's message. JOHN J. SAITO, Past Regional Director, Japanese American Citizens League
NEWS
August 18, 1994
Regarding "Remembering the Heartache of Terminal Island," July 28: Italian alien fishermen also had to leave Terminal Island, as well as Japanese nationals (alien enemies) and their dual-citizen Japanese American children. It's easy enough to raise $200,000 for a propaganda museum, when every person of Japanese descent (alien or American-born dual-citizen Japanese), received $20,000 each for "human suffering." Now they must try to justify the unjustifiable by continuing to pervert history, falsify events and revise WWII history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1991
In "A Fertile Land for Growing Hate Groups" (On California, Aug. 28), Robert A. Jones mistakenly tries to link Lillian Baker's unusual view of the wartime internment of Japanese-Americans with the Institute for Historical Review. He also erroneously claims that the IHR "collapsed" after failing to make good on a 1981 reward offer for proof of extermination gassings at Auschwitz. Rumors of our demise are, to say the least, premature. In spite of physical attacks, arson, lawsuits and media blackout, the institute is today more vital than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1989
Please allow me to take issue with James Liska who calls Harry Connick Jr. "unremarkable" ("Pianist Connick Turns Out to Be More Hype Than Hip," Calendar April 13). Connick has given both jazz and classical concerts here and abroad. Following the tutelage of Ellis Marsalis, he has played with the majority of famous New Orleans jazz musicians, who considered Connick a child prodigy at the age of six. Hardly "unremarkable." I heard him play jazz for the first time before (he was)
NEWS
November 7, 1993
Re "Graduating With Honor After 50 Years," Oct. 17: Nowhere is the $20,000 entitlement for "human suffering" mentioned. Every Nisei pictured in the (Roosevelt High School reunion) photo (probably) has accepted "for human suffering," $20,000 each, and tax free. So generous is our Uncle Sam, made so by an unearned guilt trip, that our Congress and media have supported the greatest swindle in U.S. history. Under the Japanese-American Student Relocation Program, 4,300 people of Japanese descent were assisted in entering colleges and universities, all of which accepted high school graduation credentials, whether from relocation centers or internment camps.
NEWS
August 18, 1994
Regarding "Remembering the Heartache of Terminal Island," July 28: Italian alien fishermen also had to leave Terminal Island, as well as Japanese nationals (alien enemies) and their dual-citizen Japanese American children. It's easy enough to raise $200,000 for a propaganda museum, when every person of Japanese descent (alien or American-born dual-citizen Japanese), received $20,000 each for "human suffering." Now they must try to justify the unjustifiable by continuing to pervert history, falsify events and revise WWII history.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ROBERT A. JONES
Here's a story about our past and our present. I can't claim that it means a great deal, but this story intrigues me because it involves a certain recurrent pathology. A pathology that, as far as I know, is peculiar to Southern California. It begins with Manzanar, the Japanese-American relocation center that held 10,000 internees during World War II. Several weeks ago, we discussed in this space the likelihood that Manzanar would become a National Historic Site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1996
Re "Whitewashing Manzanar," by Robert A. Jones, April 10: This site was not a prison camp. It was a war relocation center. Under the War Relocation Authority, the people were allowed to leave the centers if they had a job offer and vowed loyalty to the United States. About 35,000 did leave to live in the Midwest, and another 4,000 went to college. You also incorrectly refer to the center as an "internment camp." The War Relocation Authority's first quarterly report in 1942 stated: "A sharp distinction should be drawn at all times between residents of relocation centers ... and civilian internees.
NEWS
November 7, 1993
Re "Graduating With Honor After 50 Years," Oct. 17: Nowhere is the $20,000 entitlement for "human suffering" mentioned. Every Nisei pictured in the (Roosevelt High School reunion) photo (probably) has accepted "for human suffering," $20,000 each, and tax free. So generous is our Uncle Sam, made so by an unearned guilt trip, that our Congress and media have supported the greatest swindle in U.S. history. Under the Japanese-American Student Relocation Program, 4,300 people of Japanese descent were assisted in entering colleges and universities, all of which accepted high school graduation credentials, whether from relocation centers or internment camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1991
The Times published a column by Robert A. Jones ("A Fertile Land for Growing Hate Groups," Part A, Aug. 28) in which he completely misrepresented information I furnished him during a recent telephone interview. Jones grossly distorted my remarks about the World War II Manzanar relocation center for alien enemy Japanese and Japanese-Americans. Jones labeled me and those associated with me as "clones" of the ill-famed Institute for Historical Review, a neo-Nazi group that denied the existence of the Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1991
In "A Fertile Land for Growing Hate Groups" (On California, Aug. 28), Robert A. Jones mistakenly tries to link Lillian Baker's unusual view of the wartime internment of Japanese-Americans with the Institute for Historical Review. He also erroneously claims that the IHR "collapsed" after failing to make good on a 1981 reward offer for proof of extermination gassings at Auschwitz. Rumors of our demise are, to say the least, premature. In spite of physical attacks, arson, lawsuits and media blackout, the institute is today more vital than ever.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ROBERT A. JONES
Here's a story about our past and our present. I can't claim that it means a great deal, but this story intrigues me because it involves a certain recurrent pathology. A pathology that, as far as I know, is peculiar to Southern California. It begins with Manzanar, the Japanese-American relocation center that held 10,000 internees during World War II. Several weeks ago, we discussed in this space the likelihood that Manzanar would become a National Historic Site.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1989
Please allow me to take issue with James Liska who calls Harry Connick Jr. "unremarkable" ("Pianist Connick Turns Out to Be More Hype Than Hip," Calendar April 13). Connick has given both jazz and classical concerts here and abroad. Following the tutelage of Ellis Marsalis, he has played with the majority of famous New Orleans jazz musicians, who considered Connick a child prodigy at the age of six. Hardly "unremarkable." I heard him play jazz for the first time before (he was)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER
About two dozen World War II veterans and others protested in front of the Anaheim Public Library on Thursday to complain about its handling of two books that they say prove Japanese-Americans had to be held in camps during the war and that they were treated well. The protesters, who said they would return today and Saturday, also blasted the U.S. government for recently agreeing to give $20,000 and an apology to survivors of the relocation camps.
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