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Lillian Garrett

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Of what use is art? It's a question that never seems to go away--or receive a convincing answer. In her first play, the critical/popular hit "The Ladies of the Camellias" (West End Playhouse, 1988) Argentine-born Lillian Garrett grappled with that issue, while romping through a make-believe encounter between Eleanora Duse and Sarah Bernhardt. "I always wonder, 'Who are we doing it for?,' " the vibrant, delicately boned Garrett said with a smile. "Are we really just entertainment? I hope not."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Music does it all; it's the food of love, it soothes the savage beast, you name it. It can cut straight to the heart of any matter in a moment, a note. Sometimes all you need in the theater is a character on stage reacting to a particularly stunning musical passage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | CHRISTINE ZIAYA
Imagine a first meeting between two of the world's greatest actresses, two temperamental leading ladies of the theater who are competitors, two women who are about to take turns starring in a sentimental, romantic production. It happened--in the summer of 1897--when Sarah Bernhardt and Italy's Eleonora Duse agreed to alternate the lead in Alexandre Dumas' "Camille." Bernhardt did the matinees in French; Duse performed in Italian at night. Did they greet one another warmly?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Lillian Garrett-Groag sits in a corner booth of a mildly fashionable Los Feliz eatery. Seeking refuge from painters who have invaded her nearby home and dutifully awaiting an interview, she's enjoying a brief break in a schedule that has, of late, required her to shuttle back and forth between San Diego and the Bay Area. On Thursday, a new staging of her latest play "The Magic Fire," first seen in March at Berkeley Repertory Theatre, opens at the Old Globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Music does it all; it's the food of love, it soothes the savage beast, you name it. It can cut straight to the heart of any matter in a moment, a note. Sometimes all you need in the theater is a character on stage reacting to a particularly stunning musical passage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Lillian Garrett-Groag sits in a corner booth of a mildly fashionable Los Feliz eatery. Seeking refuge from painters who have invaded her nearby home and dutifully awaiting an interview, she's enjoying a brief break in a schedule that has, of late, required her to shuttle back and forth between San Diego and the Bay Area. On Thursday, a new staging of her latest play "The Magic Fire," first seen in March at Berkeley Repertory Theatre, opens at the Old Globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Playwright Lillian Garrett had a remarkable story to tell: how five young Germans defied the Nazis in 1943, and how the Munich Gestapo had them executed for it. She was calling her script "The White Rose," using the name the dissident students chose, and her goal was to shine a dramatist's light on the strange moral landscape of those times. But, before she finished, Garrett wanted to test her idea of moral courage against the real thing. So she did what others have done before her.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1990 | Don Shirley
A San Diego branch of A. R. Gurney's "Love Letters" will open Oct. 22 in the Old Globe Theatre. It will follow the pattern established elsewhere: rotating casts that change weekly, using well-recognized stars. First up are Elizabeth Montgomery and Robert Foxworth, Oct. 22-28, to be followed by Beth Howland and Charles Kimbrough (Oct. 30-Nov. 4) and Sada Thompson and Kevin McCarthy (Nov. 6-11). The run may extend into January. Old Globe subscribers may buy discounted tickets to "Love Letters."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Who would have expected two simultaneous stage productions to touch on the Eleanora Duse/Sarah Bernhardt rivalry? Yet here we are, with Lillian Garrett's "The Ladies of the Camellias" continuing into its third month at the West End Playhouse and the world premiere of Swiss playwright Herbert Meier's "Les Divines: Almost Like Gods," at USC's Bing Theatre. The amazing thing about both shows is how little overlap there is in terms of information.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1999
What's happening the next few weeks: * The Museum of Contemporary Art/San Diego has on display "Sacred Mirrors: The Visionary Art of Alex Grey" through May 30. Grey's Sacred Mirrors series, created between 1979 and 1989, begins inside the body, then depicts the outer body and finally the spiritual realm. 700 Prospect St., La Jolla. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m. $4; $2, students, seniors, military. (619) 454-3541.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Playwright Lillian Garrett had a remarkable story to tell: how five young Germans defied the Nazis in 1943, and how the Munich Gestapo had them executed for it. She was calling her script "The White Rose," using the name the dissident students chose, and her goal was to shine a dramatist's light on the strange moral landscape of those times. But, before she finished, Garrett wanted to test her idea of moral courage against the real thing. So she did what others have done before her.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Of what use is art? It's a question that never seems to go away--or receive a convincing answer. In her first play, the critical/popular hit "The Ladies of the Camellias" (West End Playhouse, 1988) Argentine-born Lillian Garrett grappled with that issue, while romping through a make-believe encounter between Eleanora Duse and Sarah Bernhardt. "I always wonder, 'Who are we doing it for?,' " the vibrant, delicately boned Garrett said with a smile. "Are we really just entertainment? I hope not."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | CHRISTINE ZIAYA
Imagine a first meeting between two of the world's greatest actresses, two temperamental leading ladies of the theater who are competitors, two women who are about to take turns starring in a sentimental, romantic production. It happened--in the summer of 1897--when Sarah Bernhardt and Italy's Eleonora Duse agreed to alternate the lead in Alexandre Dumas' "Camille." Bernhardt did the matinees in French; Duse performed in Italian at night. Did they greet one another warmly?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1994
The Mark Taper Forum's seventh annual New Work Festival, a series of public rehearsals of plays and performance art pieces, opens today. Admission is free, but reservations are required--call (213) 972-7392 between 3 p.m. and5 p.m., no sooner than seven days before the show you want to see. Most of the workshops and readings will be presented at the Taper, Too at the John Anson Ford Theatre, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. East. Hollywood. Unless otherwise noted, shows start at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a nationwide competition in which 35 theaters proposed entries for the funding of new plays, two San Diego theaters have been awarded two of the three grants for new plays provided by a major corporate sponsor, AT&T officials announced Monday at press conferences in New York and San Diego.
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