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Lilly Tartikoff

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MAGAZINE
March 25, 2007 | Robin Abcarian, Robin Abcarian is a Los Angeles Times staff writer.
On a bright afternoon after a lot of rain, Calla Tartikoff is beginning a physical therapy session at a small gym on Melrose Avenue. Two women--both intensely focused on Calla--lean over her on a Pilates bed, one making sure her hips are in the right place, the other pushing her feet. Calla's shadow, Brigitte Poirier, is sitting nearby on a big exercise ball, bouncing slightly. Calla is having trouble paying attention.
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MAGAZINE
April 22, 2007
I was thrilled to read Robin Abcarian's excellent article on Lilly Tartikoff as well as her daughters Calla and Lizzy ("Back on Her Feet," March 25). I've been employed by UCLA in medical sciences development for nearly 24 years and was painfully aware of Tartikoff's tragedies and inspired by her remarkable triumphs. How important it was for me to read about Calla and especially exciting to note that the Colony Cafe, near my home, was established by Lilly and Calla. I walked over and purchased a veggie sandwich, the most savory one this vegetarian has ever consumed.
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NEWS
March 15, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
A little arm-twisting can sure pay off. Lilly Tartikoff's relentless pursuit of guests to support her Fire and Ice Ball resulted in a celebrity-packed black-tie gala on Tuesday night at the Beverly Hilton that raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the new Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program. Tartikoff was teased (good-naturedly, of course) for her strong-arm tactics in fund raising.
MAGAZINE
March 25, 2007 | Robin Abcarian, Robin Abcarian is a Los Angeles Times staff writer.
On a bright afternoon after a lot of rain, Calla Tartikoff is beginning a physical therapy session at a small gym on Melrose Avenue. Two women--both intensely focused on Calla--lean over her on a Pilates bed, one making sure her hips are in the right place, the other pushing her feet. Calla's shadow, Brigitte Poirier, is sitting nearby on a big exercise ball, bouncing slightly. Calla is having trouble paying attention.
MAGAZINE
April 22, 2007
I was thrilled to read Robin Abcarian's excellent article on Lilly Tartikoff as well as her daughters Calla and Lizzy ("Back on Her Feet," March 25). I've been employed by UCLA in medical sciences development for nearly 24 years and was painfully aware of Tartikoff's tragedies and inspired by her remarkable triumphs. How important it was for me to read about Calla and especially exciting to note that the Colony Cafe, near my home, was established by Lilly and Calla. I walked over and purchased a veggie sandwich, the most savory one this vegetarian has ever consumed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brandon Tartikoff died last year, but his company--and through it, the executive's love affair with television--goes on. On Aug. 12, roughly two weeks before the first anniversary of Tartikoff's death from treatment complications related to Hodgkin's disease, the Fox network will televise "Blade Squad"--a futuristic TV movie representing one of the longtime NBC Entertainment chief's last pet projects.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most successful troikas in local fund-raising was honored Saturday night at the Century Plaza by UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center Foundation at its 50th-anniversary gala. The feted were Lilly Tartikoff, Revlon chairman Ronald Perelman and Dr. Dennis Slamon. The trio's formula boils down to this: Tartikoff raises money, Perelman donates lots more and Slamon spends it on studying breast and ovarian cancer.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
When Lilly Tartikoff wants something, she comes across like a pit bull with charm. And she wants something now. She wants money, a lot of money, for UCLA's cancer research programs in the School of Medicine, which include the clinical study of breast and ovarian cancer. On her first outing into Los Angeles' big-time charity scene, she's obtained a donation of $2.4 million from Ronald O. Perelman, chairman and CEO of New York-based Revlon to set up the Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program.
MAGAZINE
January 17, 1999
Lilly Tartikoff deserves credit for her courage during and after her husband's fatal illness and for her efforts in fund-raising ("Master of Ceremonies," by Carla Hall, Dec. 6). But her public admission that she goes for mammograms, sonograms and aspirations every few months struck me as irresponsible. Few can afford to have such frequent tests simply because they are afraid to feel their own breasts. Most women who find a lump in their breast do so before the same abnormality would have turned up in a mammogram.
MAGAZINE
December 6, 1998 | Carla Hall
It's been a long and intense day with Lilly Tartikoff. On the patio of the Peninsula Hotel, we have talked about life and love and heartache. It was Lilly's idea to escape the ringing telephones of her home. (She can't bear not to answer a phone.) After midmorning Pellegrino, a Cobb salad lunch and late-afternoon herbal tea (Lilly's tastes are basic Westside ascetic), she leaves me with a raft of images from her life. * There is Lilly in a red bikini at a tennis and pool party in L.A.
MAGAZINE
January 17, 1999
Lilly Tartikoff deserves credit for her courage during and after her husband's fatal illness and for her efforts in fund-raising ("Master of Ceremonies," by Carla Hall, Dec. 6). But her public admission that she goes for mammograms, sonograms and aspirations every few months struck me as irresponsible. Few can afford to have such frequent tests simply because they are afraid to feel their own breasts. Most women who find a lump in their breast do so before the same abnormality would have turned up in a mammogram.
MAGAZINE
December 6, 1998 | Carla Hall
It's been a long and intense day with Lilly Tartikoff. On the patio of the Peninsula Hotel, we have talked about life and love and heartache. It was Lilly's idea to escape the ringing telephones of her home. (She can't bear not to answer a phone.) After midmorning Pellegrino, a Cobb salad lunch and late-afternoon herbal tea (Lilly's tastes are basic Westside ascetic), she leaves me with a raft of images from her life. * There is Lilly in a red bikini at a tennis and pool party in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brandon Tartikoff died last year, but his company--and through it, the executive's love affair with television--goes on. On Aug. 12, roughly two weeks before the first anniversary of Tartikoff's death from treatment complications related to Hodgkin's disease, the Fox network will televise "Blade Squad"--a futuristic TV movie representing one of the longtime NBC Entertainment chief's last pet projects.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most successful troikas in local fund-raising was honored Saturday night at the Century Plaza by UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center Foundation at its 50th-anniversary gala. The feted were Lilly Tartikoff, Revlon chairman Ronald Perelman and Dr. Dennis Slamon. The trio's formula boils down to this: Tartikoff raises money, Perelman donates lots more and Slamon spends it on studying breast and ovarian cancer.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
A little arm-twisting can sure pay off. Lilly Tartikoff's relentless pursuit of guests to support her Fire and Ice Ball resulted in a celebrity-packed black-tie gala on Tuesday night at the Beverly Hilton that raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the new Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program. Tartikoff was teased (good-naturedly, of course) for her strong-arm tactics in fund raising.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES SOCIETY WRITER
When Lilly Tartikoff wants something, she comes across like a pit bull with charm. And she wants something now. She wants money, a lot of money, for UCLA's cancer research programs in the School of Medicine, which include the clinical study of breast and ovarian cancer. On her first outing into Los Angeles' big-time charity scene, she's obtained a donation of $2.4 million from Ronald O. Perelman, chairman and CEO of New York-based Revlon to set up the Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program.
NEWS
May 11, 1994 | SHARI ROAN
Pity the poor doctors. A panel of five health experts met face to face with 1,200 very vocal women Friday in the first "Women And Doctors," a luncheon and briefing on major women's health issues held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The event, sponsored in association with the Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program, featured questions on such issues as osteoporosis, breast and ovarian cancer and heart disease. The questions often centered on the inequity in women's health research.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | Diane Haithman
The Museum of Contemporary Art, revealed to be in dire financial straits late last year, said Thursday that the downtown L.A. museum had raised nearly $60 million since December, hailing the figure as an indication of a turnaround at the institution. The fundraising total includes December's $30-million pledge from the Broad Foundation, $16.4 million in trustee gifts, $3 million from individual patrons, $6.7 million from the museum's annual fund and $3.8 in trustee dues. MOCA also has announced the election of four trustees, two newly appointed and two returning.
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