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NEWS
March 4, 2004 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
War, domestic violence, prejudice, abandonment: Children, as well as adults, are caught up in these harsh realities. Without the frames of reference of time and experience, how do young victims cope with hurt, confusion and fear? And how can a play address the subjects for young audiences without frightening them, and without compromising honesty and artistic integrity?
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NEWS
March 4, 2004 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
War, domestic violence, prejudice, abandonment: Children, as well as adults, are caught up in these harsh realities. Without the frames of reference of time and experience, how do young victims cope with hurt, confusion and fear? And how can a play address the subjects for young audiences without frightening them, and without compromising honesty and artistic integrity?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
The apocalypse is no place for wimps. Whiners, on the other hand, are generously accommodated in Denis Henry Hennelly's "Goodbye World," an unconvincing, poorly conceived hybrid of end-of-the-world thriller and relationship drama. The collapse of this civilization arrives via text message; the words "Goodbye World" prelude the sudden breakdown of all technological infrastructure. The stockpiles of food that survivalist James (Adrian Grenier) had hoarded in his off-the-grid cottage can feed his wife, Lily (Kerry Bishé)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | TERRY ATKINSON
Even though Warren Beatty's film version of "Batman" is a long way from theaters, let alone video stores, there's still a dynamic duo new to videocassette this week. In fact, it's a dynamic duo doubled : In the 1988 comedy "Big Business" (Touchstone, $89.95, PG), Bette Midler and Lily Tomlin play two sets of mixed-up identical twins (a la "The Comedy of Errors," with one set poor, the other wealthy) on opposite sides of a factory-closure battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1987
A sampling of projects revolving around women in small groups and large that moviegoers may see in the next 18 months: Female Ensemble "The Whales of August"--about two elderly sisters (Bette Davis, Lillian Gish) and their best friend (Ann Sothern). Lindsay Anderson directed for Alive Films. Opens in October. "Sweet Little Rock 'n' Roller"--about a group of girls (Justine Bateman, Trini Alvarado, Britta Phillips, Julia Roberts) who spend the summer playing in rock 'n' roll clubs.
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