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Limestone Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY
A "routine" City Council resolution that will allow the county to receive a large tract of Limestone Canyon was approved last month without sufficient public and council discussion, a council member charged Tuesday. The June 11 vote will allow the county to receive a huge section of Limestone Canyon from the Irvine Co. if the council at its meeting next Tuesday approves the company's plan to build a 2,885-home project.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2010 | Mike Anton
They walked through land with a storied history, following in the footsteps of Native Americans and explorer Gaspar de Portola, Spanish and Mexican land barons, rancher James Irvine and billionaire developer Donald Bren. They carried backpacks and cameras, pushed strollers and bombed down hills on mountain bikes. And after the gates to Limestone Canyon closed for the day Saturday, a few hundred people had gotten a glimpse of the future of Orange County's park system. "There is so much beauty back there you wouldn't believe it," said Dave Swartout, 52, after finishing his bike ride.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2010 | Mike Anton
They walked through land with a storied history, following in the footsteps of Native Americans and explorer Gaspar de Portola, Spanish and Mexican land barons, rancher James Irvine and billionaire developer Donald Bren. They carried backpacks and cameras, pushed strollers and bombed down hills on mountain bikes. And after the gates to Limestone Canyon closed for the day Saturday, a few hundred people had gotten a glimpse of the future of Orange County's park system. "There is so much beauty back there you wouldn't believe it," said Dave Swartout, 52, after finishing his bike ride.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | By Scott Kraft, Los Angeles Times
A rugged, 20,000-acre parcel of the original Irvine Ranch — a pristine landscape of steep canyons, native grassland and sycamore woodland that is home to golden eagles, mountain lions and dozens of rare and endangered species of plants and animals — became public property Tuesday in a historic deal with the developer who has sculpted the look of modern suburbia in Southern California. The open-space land, a gift from Donald Bren and the Irvine Co., was unanimously accepted by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, which also approved a long-term plan to manage the natural habitat, designated a National Natural Landmark four years ago. In one swoop, the size of parkland owned by the county grew by more than half.
NEWS
May 8, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in this secluded canyon, time is measured in centuries, even millennia. Little has changed in the 4 million years since a stream began carving an eternal path through the sandstone cliffs. Yet for more than 100 years, few people have set foot in this secluded, ancient place called Limestone Canyon. Until now, its visitors, almost exclusively, have been limited to the descendants of rancher James Irvine and their successors at the Irvine Co., headed by Chairman Donald Bren.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The red and white no-trespassing signs that warn visitors away from Limestone Canyon are as worn as the rusted barbed wire fence that holds them. The white iron gate is locked, and it creaks loudly when it opens, having been used over the years by only a handful of visitors and cattle ranchers. Behind the gate, shady glens stretch gently away from the road and over ridges draped in wildflowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | DON TORMEY, Los Angeles Times
Limestone Canyon, little known but open to the public by reservation, promises unusual sights--even a hint of the Grand Canyon. Longing for adventure? Or at least a respite from traffic, cell phones and office buildings? Take a trip to one of Orange County's best-kept secrets, Limestone Canyon. Nestled opposite Modjeska and Silverado Canyons off Santiago Canyon Road, Limestone Canyon Regional Park is a small-scale version of Arizona's Grand Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1989
An agreement to gradually transfer ownership of a 5,360-acre preserve of oak groves and canyon lands to the county will be discussed Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors. The area, known as Limestone Canyon, is currently owned by the Irvine Co. and is east of Irvine and north of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. The deal hinges on the completion of the eastern toll road and two Irvine Co. developments--Northwood Village in Irvine and East Orange in Orange. As certain phases of those projects are reached, the Irvine Co. will dedicate sections of the park to the county.
NEWS
May 5, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in this secluded canyon, time is measured in centuries, even millennia. And why not? Little has changed in the 4 million years since a stream began carving an eternal path through these sandstone cliffs. Yet, for more than 100 years, few people have stepped foot into this secluded, ancient place called Limestone Canyon. Until now, its visitors, almost exclusively, have been limited to the descendants of rancher James Irvine and their successors at the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1995
Wheel Fun--Take a 27-mile bike ride through Aliso and Wood Canyons Regional Park in Laguna Niguel at 9 a.m. Saturday. The ride, sponsored by Sierra Sage, will stay on the paved trails through this 3,400-acre parkland. The canyons are green and lush from the recent rains. Sights include waterfalls and cliffs. A variety of birds are indigenous to the area, including red-tailed hawks, woodpeckers, finches and mountain bluebirds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2008 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Like nervous party hosts, Orange County parks officials unveiled plans Tuesday to reopen badly burned Limestone Canyon and Whiting Ranch Wilderness Park on Saturday after months of laborious prep work. Potential killer dead trees cleared? Check. Herbicide sprayed on exotic weeds? Check. Tons of debris cleared from trail bottoms? Check. New signs, trail makers and fencing are all in place too. Now the biggest worry may be the potentially unruly guests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2008 | Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 40,000 acres of Orange County parkland stretching from the coast to the foothills -- once part of the historic Irvine Ranch -- has been deemed so ecologically valuable by state officials that on Tuesday they designated it the first California Natural Landmark. The program is designed to recognize significant open space areas by placing them in a statewide registry. Although the designation is only a title -- it does not require the land to be permanently protected or opened to the public -- officials hope the attention it brings will encourage long-term preservation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | DON TORMEY, Los Angeles Times
Limestone Canyon, little known but open to the public by reservation, promises unusual sights--even a hint of the Grand Canyon. Longing for adventure? Or at least a respite from traffic, cell phones and office buildings? Take a trip to one of Orange County's best-kept secrets, Limestone Canyon. Nestled opposite Modjeska and Silverado Canyons off Santiago Canyon Road, Limestone Canyon Regional Park is a small-scale version of Arizona's Grand Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1995
Wheel Fun--Take a 27-mile bike ride through Aliso and Wood Canyons Regional Park in Laguna Niguel at 9 a.m. Saturday. The ride, sponsored by Sierra Sage, will stay on the paved trails through this 3,400-acre parkland. The canyons are green and lush from the recent rains. Sights include waterfalls and cliffs. A variety of birds are indigenous to the area, including red-tailed hawks, woodpeckers, finches and mountain bluebirds.
NEWS
May 8, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in this secluded canyon, time is measured in centuries, even millennia. Little has changed in the 4 million years since a stream began carving an eternal path through the sandstone cliffs. Yet for more than 100 years, few people have set foot in this secluded, ancient place called Limestone Canyon. Until now, its visitors, almost exclusively, have been limited to the descendants of rancher James Irvine and their successors at the Irvine Co., headed by Chairman Donald Bren.
NEWS
May 5, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in this secluded canyon, time is measured in centuries, even millennia. And why not? Little has changed in the 4 million years since a stream began carving an eternal path through these sandstone cliffs. Yet, for more than 100 years, few people have stepped foot into this secluded, ancient place called Limestone Canyon. Until now, its visitors, almost exclusively, have been limited to the descendants of rancher James Irvine and their successors at the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | By Scott Kraft, Los Angeles Times
A rugged, 20,000-acre parcel of the original Irvine Ranch — a pristine landscape of steep canyons, native grassland and sycamore woodland that is home to golden eagles, mountain lions and dozens of rare and endangered species of plants and animals — became public property Tuesday in a historic deal with the developer who has sculpted the look of modern suburbia in Southern California. The open-space land, a gift from Donald Bren and the Irvine Co., was unanimously accepted by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, which also approved a long-term plan to manage the natural habitat, designated a National Natural Landmark four years ago. In one swoop, the size of parkland owned by the county grew by more than half.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2008 | Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 40,000 acres of Orange County parkland stretching from the coast to the foothills -- once part of the historic Irvine Ranch -- has been deemed so ecologically valuable by state officials that on Tuesday they designated it the first California Natural Landmark. The program is designed to recognize significant open space areas by placing them in a statewide registry. Although the designation is only a title -- it does not require the land to be permanently protected or opened to the public -- officials hope the attention it brings will encourage long-term preservation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY
A "routine" City Council resolution that will allow the county to receive a large tract of Limestone Canyon was approved last month without sufficient public and council discussion, a council member charged Tuesday. The June 11 vote will allow the county to receive a huge section of Limestone Canyon from the Irvine Co. if the council at its meeting next Tuesday approves the company's plan to build a 2,885-home project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The red and white no-trespassing signs that warn visitors away from Limestone Canyon are as worn as the rusted barbed wire fence that holds them. The white iron gate is locked, and it creaks loudly when it opens, having been used over the years by only a handful of visitors and cattle ranchers. Behind the gate, shady glens stretch gently away from the road and over ridges draped in wildflowers.
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