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Lina Basquette

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NEWS
October 5, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lina Basquette, the raven-haired dancer and actress best remembered as the leading lady in Cecil B. DeMille's final silent film "The Godless Girl," has died. She was 87. She died Friday at her home in Wheeling, W.V., from lymphoma, her grandson, Michael Hiatt, said Tuesday in Los Angeles. Miss Basquette, who spent her later years breeding and judging Great Dane champion dogs, was born Lena Baskette on April 19, 1907, in San Mateo, Calif.
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NEWS
October 5, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lina Basquette, the raven-haired dancer and actress best remembered as the leading lady in Cecil B. DeMille's final silent film "The Godless Girl," has died. She was 87. She died Friday at her home in Wheeling, W.V., from lymphoma, her grandson, Michael Hiatt, said Tuesday in Los Angeles. Miss Basquette, who spent her later years breeding and judging Great Dane champion dogs, was born Lena Baskette on April 19, 1907, in San Mateo, Calif.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There have been many Hollywood Golden Era stars far more famous than Lina Basquette, but few have had lives crammed with so much romance and adventure, heartbreak and accomplishment. A novelist would be hard put to invent a life as colorful as hers. Movie moguls, gangsters and European noblemen pursued her. Jack Dempsey was in love with her, and she fought off Hitler's advances while visiting his mountain retreat with her lover of the moment, a German baron.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There have been many Hollywood Golden Era stars far more famous than Lina Basquette, but few have had lives crammed with so much romance and adventure, heartbreak and accomplishment. A novelist would be hard put to invent a life as colorful as hers. Movie moguls, gangsters and European noblemen pursued her. Jack Dempsey was in love with her, and she fought off Hitler's advances while visiting his mountain retreat with her lover of the moment, a German baron.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Even when movies were in their infancy, political, religious and other groups realized that cinema was a great tool to get their message across to mass audiences. Before America entered World War I in 1916, a huge range of issues was explored in cinema -- including tuberculosis, abortion, temperance, child labor and organized crime. As cinema became more sophisticated after the war, so did its social content. But most such early films have been unseen by modern audiences -- until now.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Silent Movie, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., presents Wednesday through Sunday at 8 p.m. a series of films preserved by the UCLA Film Archive with a portion of the admission going toward its preservation program. By and large all the films, two of which are talkies, have in common a sure sense of the pictorial and inspired production design, heightened by superb black-and-white cinematography.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1997 | JILL ROSENFELD and SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
UNDER THE CLOAK OF NIGHT -- With several local dog shows impending, and the canine circuit advancing fast, four interested associates convene a secret meeting. Their mission: to expose the dirty underbelly of dog showing. "I'll talk only on the condition of anonymity," says Lynda Beltz (not her real name). "This could end my career in dogs." "Don't even mention my breed," says Edgar Simmons (not his real name either). "Say I specialize in African sneeze hounds."
BOOKS
March 30, 1997 | GAVIN LAMBERT, Gavin Lambert is the author of "Nazimova: A Biography," forthcoming in April from Alfred A. Knopf
The secret of the silent film, wrote Kevin Brownlow in "The Parade's Gone By," his classic 1968 account of the silent period, was the creative demand it made on its audience. The great silent movie directors perfected an art based on visual expressiveness, the power of imaginative lighting and composition, and "the audience responded to suggestion, supplied the missing sounds and voices."
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