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Lincoln Avenue Water Co

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NEWS
April 5, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Richard and Priscilla Benson started asking questions last year about the rates their water company was charging, they felt the responses were abrupt. "We were just shareholders interested in making better use of ground water," said Richard Benson, 45, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineer. "The company was saying, 'We don't want your input, leave us alone.' " Now, the couple find themselves leading an insurgent group of customers, Concerned Shareholders of Lincoln Avenue Water Co.
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NEWS
April 5, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Richard and Priscilla Benson started asking questions last year about the rates their water company was charging, they felt the responses were abrupt. "We were just shareholders interested in making better use of ground water," said Richard Benson, 45, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineer. "The company was saying, 'We don't want your input, leave us alone.' " Now, the couple find themselves leading an insurgent group of customers, Concerned Shareholders of Lincoln Avenue Water Co.
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NEWS
May 7, 1992
Despite an aggressive challenge, Lincoln Avenue Water Co. board of directors member Robert Horner was reelected Monday night by a 2-1 margin. Write-in candidate Ray Towne, an Altadena attorney backed by a group of shareholders critical of the water company's rates and its handling of well contamination, received 395 votes to Horner's 661. Horner was reelected to a five-year term.
NEWS
April 9, 1992
A proxy battle at the annual meeting of the Lincoln Avenue Water Co. remained unresolved Monday after company officials determined that they did not have a quorum of 987 of the company's 6,179 shares represented at the meeting and therefore could not conduct business. An insurgent group of water customers were seeking to have their candidate, attorney Ray Towne, elected to the board in place of longtime board member Robert W. Horner.
NEWS
August 8, 1993
Five incumbents were reelected without opposition Tuesday to the board of directors of an Altadena water company. Reelected to the board of Lincoln Avenue Water Co. were Lester Allen, a water systems employee with the city of Pasadena; John Clairday, an attorney; Wilton Clarke Sr., a retired banker; Richard Fiedler, a chemical and mechanical engineer, and Robert Gomperz, a media relations specialist for the Metropolitan Water District.
NEWS
June 20, 1993
The Lincoln Avenue Water Co. voted last week to hold its board election in August after a Superior Court Judge lifted a court order preventing an election. "We're looking forward to getting out of the legal arena and back into the water supply business," water board member Bob Gomperz said of the company's victory against Concerned Shareholders of Lincoln Avenue Water. The company supplies water to Altadena residents. Gomperz said the board voted to hold the election Aug 3.
NEWS
June 21, 1992
The Town Council voted unanimously last week to appoint a special committee to investigate residents' complaints that their water rates are too high. The council acted after three of the unincorporated area's water suppliers turned down its request to appear at its meeting Tuesday and a representative of the fourth supplier defended its rate structure.
NEWS
November 15, 1992
Jet Propulsion Laboratory's spokesman's claim that it funded construction of a water treatment plant to clean up Pasadena's contaminated drinking water ("Arroyo Cleanup Gets Boost," Los Angeles Times, Oct. 22) lacks sincerity and is also a slap in the face of 4,100 Altadena families. The fact is that ground water was contaminated by the dumping of dangerous chemicals on JPL property. The lab consented to financing the Arroyo Seco Treatment Plant only after Pasadena rattled its legal saber.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can see it from the ridge overlooking the dusty scrub of the Arroyo Seco and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's jumble of buildings. There are a couple of towers--like a pair of big grain silos--some tanks, and a network of pipes and ducts. City officials sometimes call it "Willy Wonka's Chocolate Machine."
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