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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Attention spans are said to be shrinking and perhaps they are. But tell that to parents who cannot pull their kids away from video games. Tell that to epic-besotted Harry Potter, "Star Wars" and Tolkien fans. And tell it to the Lincoln Center Festival, which opened its 2005 edition last week. The three-week festival offers a large variety of music, dance, theater and video, as well as a mix of all those media in various ways.
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OPINION
May 15, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Much as it pains me to admit this, the first classical music I ever heard was the soundtrack to a cartoon. Probably Bugs Bunny. I remedied this at first thanks to a high school teacher who played us Shostakovich and Mozart and John Cage. Now, I listen to the classics with joy, and without thinking of Bugs or "The Lone Ranger." But opera? That's pretty much a hemi-demi-semi-quaver too far. Which is why I was grateful to talk to John Rockwell. With Wagner's "Ring" cycle spending the summer at the Los Angeles Opera, Rockwell — former Los Angeles Times and New York Times critic and editor, author and founding director of the Lincoln Center Festival — is the ideal guide to the art form (that's a copy of the CD booklet for the seminal 1953 Bayreuth "Siegfried" tucked in his pocket)
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1996 | Justin Davidson, Justin Davidson is classical music critic at Newsday
"I've always loved festivals," says John Rockwell, contemplating with satisfaction the fact that after a career spent with his reporter's eye fixed on cultural events, he now has one of his own to run. Rockwell, director of the Lincoln Center Festival (which gets underway Monday and runs through Aug. 11), may be an impresario now, but he is an observer by trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Attention spans are said to be shrinking and perhaps they are. But tell that to parents who cannot pull their kids away from video games. Tell that to epic-besotted Harry Potter, "Star Wars" and Tolkien fans. And tell it to the Lincoln Center Festival, which opened its 2005 edition last week. The three-week festival offers a large variety of music, dance, theater and video, as well as a mix of all those media in various ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1998 | JERRY CROWE
POP/ROCK Back to the Garden: The first large-scale concerts with major-name talent at the site of the original Woodstock since the original Woodstock 29 years ago will be held Aug. 14 and 15, commemorating the anniversary of those "three days of peace and music."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2000 | JUSTIN DAVIDSON, NEWSDAY
Gordon Davis, who will become president of Lincoln Center at the beginning of the year, is not daunted by the prospect of his new job. "I could probably go to my office and go to sleep and nobody would notice anything wrong for months and months," he said with a laugh. Lincoln Center is an efficient organization, but Davis, a real estate lawyer, a New York City parks commissioner under former Mayor Edward Koch and the first chairman of Jazz at Lincoln Center, will still have plenty to do.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Greg Sandow, Greg Sandow is a music critic and reporter for the Wall Street Journal and other publications
This is the saga of "The Peony Pavilion." It begins with two competing American producers, who each plan to stage this classic Chinese opera in the West--one of them L.A.'s own perpetual enfant terrible Peter Sellars. Along the way, it links Henry Kissinger, three leading Chinese artistic emigres, a host of craftspeople and performers, and two formidable retired divas, Beverly Sills, and from the world of Peking opera, Ma Bomin, who now rules all Shanghai culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2001 | MARTIN STEINBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Still youthful, maestro Gerard Schwarz celebrates his 54th birthday this weekend at a bittersweet moment. Days after his birthday on Sunday, he will give his final performances as music director of Lincoln Center's venerable Mostly Mozart summer festival, a position he has held in his home turf for 17 years. The Juilliard-trained conductor and former New York Philharmonic trumpet player has been associated with the festival for nearly two decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Ignore China at your own risk. Nixon said it a quarter century ago. The music world, a lot slower on the uptake, is now getting the message. That China is suddenly becoming a significant force in Western music should be of no surprise. Isaac Stern went to Beijing years ago to help awaken a musical sleeping giant. So did Pavarotti. So did American and European orchestras.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2000 | KARIN LIPSON, NEWSDAY
There's Vermeer and video, reggae and avant-garde electronic music, symposia and the circus. Lincoln Center Festival 2000, which begins today and runs through July 30, features 29 productions, including 16 premieres and debuts, that are nothing if not eclectic. In fact, can such a varied program be said to have a central theme? "A lot of what we're doing here is about the intersection of cultures," says Nigel Redden, director of the festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK--While ever loved as a wonderful town, post-9/11 this remains a wary town. In the subway, for instance, a slight smell of smoke--common enough from small track fires or station renovation work--was once ignored by hardened commuters but now generates nervous looks and panicky exits. New York hops as it always does in the summer, but the World Trade Center tragedy and fear of terrorism are continuing undercurrents.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2001 | MARTIN STEINBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Still youthful, maestro Gerard Schwarz celebrates his 54th birthday this weekend at a bittersweet moment. Days after his birthday on Sunday, he will give his final performances as music director of Lincoln Center's venerable Mostly Mozart summer festival, a position he has held in his home turf for 17 years. The Juilliard-trained conductor and former New York Philharmonic trumpet player has been associated with the festival for nearly two decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
After years of neglect, new operas have started making regular appearances at American opera companies, and audiences have indicated their approval. But the newness of those operas is not in their style or methods, not in their interest in doing something fresh with genre. Instead, they are typically traditional musical illustrations of popular American plays, novels and films. In Europe, however, a new opera is more often likely to take an original approach to the genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2000 | JUSTIN DAVIDSON, NEWSDAY
Gordon Davis, who will become president of Lincoln Center at the beginning of the year, is not daunted by the prospect of his new job. "I could probably go to my office and go to sleep and nobody would notice anything wrong for months and months," he said with a laugh. Lincoln Center is an efficient organization, but Davis, a real estate lawyer, a New York City parks commissioner under former Mayor Edward Koch and the first chairman of Jazz at Lincoln Center, will still have plenty to do.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2000 | KARIN LIPSON, NEWSDAY
There's Vermeer and video, reggae and avant-garde electronic music, symposia and the circus. Lincoln Center Festival 2000, which begins today and runs through July 30, features 29 productions, including 16 premieres and debuts, that are nothing if not eclectic. In fact, can such a varied program be said to have a central theme? "A lot of what we're doing here is about the intersection of cultures," says Nigel Redden, director of the festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999 | KEN SMITH, New York-based Ken Smith writes about music and opera
Seated behind a table during rehearsals in rural Massachusetts for "The Peony Pavilion," Chen Shizheng looks less like an opera director than a military commander. Facing his Chinese forces with complete attention, he wields control on many fronts, not just the usual view through the proscenium but also the sides of the stage, which are fully exposed to audience view.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999 | KEN SMITH, New York-based Ken Smith writes about music and opera
Seated behind a table during rehearsals in rural Massachusetts for "The Peony Pavilion," Chen Shizheng looks less like an opera director than a military commander. Facing his Chinese forces with complete attention, he wields control on many fronts, not just the usual view through the proscenium but also the sides of the stage, which are fully exposed to audience view.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Greg Sandow, Greg Sandow is a music critic and reporter for the Wall Street Journal and other publications
This is the saga of "The Peony Pavilion." It begins with two competing American producers, who each plan to stage this classic Chinese opera in the West--one of them L.A.'s own perpetual enfant terrible Peter Sellars. Along the way, it links Henry Kissinger, three leading Chinese artistic emigres, a host of craftspeople and performers, and two formidable retired divas, Beverly Sills, and from the world of Peking opera, Ma Bomin, who now rules all Shanghai culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1998 | JERRY CROWE
POP/ROCK Back to the Garden: The first large-scale concerts with major-name talent at the site of the original Woodstock since the original Woodstock 29 years ago will be held Aug. 14 and 15, commemorating the anniversary of those "three days of peace and music."
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