Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLincoln Electric Co
IN THE NEWS

Lincoln Electric Co

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1997 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's biggest seller of a widely used but fracture-prone weld metal has been hit with a new and sweeping defective product lawsuit that seeks more than $1 billion in damages. Filed on behalf of the owners of hundreds of steel-frame buildings in Los Angeles County, the lawsuit accuses the Cleveland-based Lincoln Electric Co. of making and marketing a weld metal that poses "an unreasonable risk of danger" to building owners and the public. Kenneth R.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disputing charges by local building owners, the nation's largest maker of a widely used but possibly fracture-prone weld metal has denied allegations that its product exposed the public to "an unreasonable risk of danger" in steel-frame structures damaged in the Northridge earthquake. The Lincoln Electric Co.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disputing charges by local building owners, the nation's largest maker of a widely used but possibly fracture-prone weld metal has denied allegations that its product exposed the public to "an unreasonable risk of danger" in steel-frame structures damaged in the Northridge earthquake. The Lincoln Electric Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1997 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's biggest seller of a widely used but fracture-prone weld metal has been hit with a new and sweeping defective product lawsuit that seeks more than $1 billion in damages. Filed on behalf of the owners of hundreds of steel-frame buildings in Los Angeles County, the lawsuit accuses the Cleveland-based Lincoln Electric Co. of making and marketing a weld metal that poses "an unreasonable risk of danger" to building owners and the public. Kenneth R.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one here could possibly have felt it, but the Northridge earthquake has arrived at a company in Cleveland. The Lincoln Electric Co. has sold more welding metal than any other firm in the United States--including the type of material used to build many of the steel structures damaged by the January 1994 earthquake. When the quake hit one of those structures, St.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Lincoln Electric Co. said it settled a lawsuit claiming that welding wire it made contributed to building damage in the January 1994 Northridge earthquake. Terms weren't disclosed, although the welding equipment maker said the settlement isn't expected to have a material effect on earnings. Cleveland-based Lincoln was sued by St. John's Medical Plaza in Santa Monica, which sought $10 million in damages. The agreement needs court approval, which is expected in September, Lincoln said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1997
With attention directed to the massive floods in Northern California, it's a good time to remember that the best way to prepare for disasters is to learn from past ones. That's why a return to the state's last big earthquake is in order. Legal developments surrounding St. John's Medical Plaza in Santa Monica have resurrected perhaps the final puzzle of the 1994 Northridge earthquake: the greatly unanticipated damage sustained by the region's steel frame buildings.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing to set a stratospheric standard for generosity to employees, Kingston Technology Corp. has handed out $20 million in bonuses at a time when the memory-chip industry is hitting an all-time low. The payouts--$10 million each in July and August, to nearly 700 employees--is the second round of bonuses that Kingston founders David Sun and John Tu have bestowed since selling 80% of the Fountain Valley computer memory product maker to Softbank Corp. of Japan for $1.5 billion in 1996.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | SONIA NAZARIO and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At least a dozen steel-framed office buildings--a type of construction long considered invulnerable to collapse--sustained deep cracks in their supporting columns during the Northridge earthquake, raising new and troubling safety concerns. The scope and the unprecedented nature of the failures has shaken the confidence of many engineers and prompted building owners to search for hidden damage in other buildings.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Applied Materials in Silicon Valley, laying off workers has become almost as routine as dumping old hardware. The manufacturer of chip-making equipment fired 2,000 employees--15% of its work force--in August, only three months after firing 1,500. Applied Materials is hardly alone. U.S. firms announced in October plans to cut 91,500 jobs, the most in nearly three years. In the first 10 months of this year, job cuts totaled 523,000, nearly all of them domestic.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one here could possibly have felt it, but the Northridge earthquake has arrived at a company in Cleveland. The Lincoln Electric Co. has sold more welding metal than any other firm in the United States--including the type of material used to build many of the steel structures damaged by the January 1994 earthquake. When the quake hit one of those structures, St.
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Engineers do not allow this material to be used for building bridges or oil pipelines. They know it's not strong enough. But for the steel-frame structures that we live and work in, they have allowed builders to use it by the ton. Obscured beneath eye-pleasing finishings, the material is a weld metal that fuses thick beams, columns and plates of structural steel. Walk through most any steel building from San Diego to Seattle and it surrounds you.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|