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January 6, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lincoln Kirstein, one of the most influential figures in 20th century American arts and letters who is credited with bringing choreographer George Balanchine and ballet as an art form to America, died Friday. He was 88. Kirstein died in his Manhattan home of natural causes, according to Jeffrey Peterson, a spokesman for the New York City Ballet, which Kirstein co-founded. "We have lost a founder, a father, a friend," said Peter Martins, the current head of the New York City Ballet.
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NEWS
January 6, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lincoln Kirstein, one of the most influential figures in 20th century American arts and letters who is credited with bringing choreographer George Balanchine and ballet as an art form to America, died Friday. He was 88. Kirstein died in his Manhattan home of natural causes, according to Jeffrey Peterson, a spokesman for the New York City Ballet, which Kirstein co-founded. "We have lost a founder, a father, a friend," said Peter Martins, the current head of the New York City Ballet.
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NEWS
September 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Lincoln Kirstein, who persuaded master choreographer George Balanchine to come to America and establish a ballet school here 55 years ago, is retiring. The 82-year-old director of the New York City Ballet and its affiliated School of American Ballet said he will step down Nov. 1. Kirstein and Balanchine, who died six years ago, founded the school in 1934 after Kirstein got Balanchine to move from Europe. The dance company was begun in 1946.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Lincoln Kirstein, who persuaded master choreographer George Balanchine to come to America and establish a ballet school here 55 years ago, is retiring. The 82-year-old director of the New York City Ballet and its affiliated School of American Ballet said he will step down Nov. 1. Kirstein and Balanchine, who died six years ago, founded the school in 1934 after Kirstein got Balanchine to move from Europe. The dance company was begun in 1946.
BOOKS
March 19, 1989 | Jack Miles
An admired book of photographs by Walker Evans, one of America's most admired photographers, received its fourth edition recently in conjunction with an Evans exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. "American Photographs" was first published in 1938 when perhaps its greatest impact came less as art than as journalism: It was a stark, deeply moving but utterly unsentimental presentation of rural poverty during the Great Depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ballet School Opening: The School of American Ballet, the dance academy founded by George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein, christened its lavish new quarters in Lincoln Center on Wednesday. The influential school, which is affiliated with New York City Ballet and has numerous graduates in the United States and abroad, becomes one of the few ballet academies in the United States that boards students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nathalie Gleboff, 88, a former executive director of the School of American Ballet, which is affiliated with the New York City Ballet, died Sept. 30 from pneumonia in Santa Barbara, the school announced. She was the last of the women of Russian background hired by George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein to run the school or its various activities since its founding in 1934, the New York Times reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New York City Ballet is "close to concluding" arrangements to return to the Orange County Performing Arts Center in September, according to the company's executive director, William Wingate. Wingate did not say how long the troupe would perform in Orange County, nor did he disclose repertory. But he did confirm that the company is involved "in serious talks" to include Costa Mesa on its first West Coast visit since its one-week stint at the Center in October, 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1996 | MIKE CARTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Her mother's peaceful death at age 92 finally got Frances Berenice Schreuder what the murder of her father could not: his money. Or at least what's left of it. Schreuder, a onetime Manhattan socialite and former member of the board of directors of the New York City Ballet, is less than six months from parole after serving 12 years of a life term in Utah State Prison for ordering her son to kill her multimillionaire father, Franklin Bradshaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES
Most of the music on the Pacific Symphony's outdoor programs is short, but memorable. Here are some quick notes on a few of the pieces. * Aaron Copland's "Old American Songs" are arrangements of traditional 19th century American songs. Copland made a collection of five songs in 1950 and added a second set in 1952. They range from the haunting "Long Time Ago" to the rousing hymn, "Zion's Walls." A sampling will be sung by baritone Daniel Belcher.
BOOKS
March 19, 1989 | Jack Miles
An admired book of photographs by Walker Evans, one of America's most admired photographers, received its fourth edition recently in conjunction with an Evans exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. "American Photographs" was first published in 1938 when perhaps its greatest impact came less as art than as journalism: It was a stark, deeply moving but utterly unsentimental presentation of rural poverty during the Great Depression.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Henry-Russell Hitchcock, considered the dean of America's architectural historians and teachers, has died of cancer at the age of 83. Hitchcock died here Thursday. "Of our generation, he was the leader of us all," architect Philip Johnson said. "He set a new standard of architectural scholarship and accuracy of judgment. In my opinion, the standard has yet to be equaled." Hitchcock's books on architectural history became standard references.
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