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January 6, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lincoln Kirstein, one of the most influential figures in 20th century American arts and letters who is credited with bringing choreographer George Balanchine and ballet as an art form to America, died Friday. He was 88. Kirstein died in his Manhattan home of natural causes, according to Jeffrey Peterson, a spokesman for the New York City Ballet, which Kirstein co-founded. "We have lost a founder, a father, a friend," said Peter Martins, the current head of the New York City Ballet.
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NEWS
January 6, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lincoln Kirstein, one of the most influential figures in 20th century American arts and letters who is credited with bringing choreographer George Balanchine and ballet as an art form to America, died Friday. He was 88. Kirstein died in his Manhattan home of natural causes, according to Jeffrey Peterson, a spokesman for the New York City Ballet, which Kirstein co-founded. "We have lost a founder, a father, a friend," said Peter Martins, the current head of the New York City Ballet.
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NEWS
September 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Lincoln Kirstein, who persuaded master choreographer George Balanchine to come to America and establish a ballet school here 55 years ago, is retiring. The 82-year-old director of the New York City Ballet and its affiliated School of American Ballet said he will step down Nov. 1. Kirstein and Balanchine, who died six years ago, founded the school in 1934 after Kirstein got Balanchine to move from Europe. The dance company was begun in 1946.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Lincoln Kirstein, who persuaded master choreographer George Balanchine to come to America and establish a ballet school here 55 years ago, is retiring. The 82-year-old director of the New York City Ballet and its affiliated School of American Ballet said he will step down Nov. 1. Kirstein and Balanchine, who died six years ago, founded the school in 1934 after Kirstein got Balanchine to move from Europe. The dance company was begun in 1946.
BOOKS
March 19, 1989 | Jack Miles
An admired book of photographs by Walker Evans, one of America's most admired photographers, received its fourth edition recently in conjunction with an Evans exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. "American Photographs" was first published in 1938 when perhaps its greatest impact came less as art than as journalism: It was a stark, deeply moving but utterly unsentimental presentation of rural poverty during the Great Depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ballet School Opening: The School of American Ballet, the dance academy founded by George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein, christened its lavish new quarters in Lincoln Center on Wednesday. The influential school, which is affiliated with New York City Ballet and has numerous graduates in the United States and abroad, becomes one of the few ballet academies in the United States that boards students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nathalie Gleboff, 88, a former executive director of the School of American Ballet, which is affiliated with the New York City Ballet, died Sept. 30 from pneumonia in Santa Barbara, the school announced. She was the last of the women of Russian background hired by George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein to run the school or its various activities since its founding in 1934, the New York Times reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Kevin Jarre, a screenwriter steeped in American history who wrote the Civil War saga "Glory" and the western "Tombstone," died unexpectedly of heart failure April 3 at his Santa Monica home, said his aunt, Patty Briley Bean. He was 56. Jarre had been a self-described "Civil War freak" since childhood, when he received toy soldiers from the era for Christmas. His interest in the 54th Massachusetts, a regiment that was one of first black units during the Civil War, was piqued when a friend, Lincoln Kirstein, observed that a photograph of Jarre on horseback resembled a statue of Col. Robert Gould Shaw, the regiment's white leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New York City Ballet is "close to concluding" arrangements to return to the Orange County Performing Arts Center in September, according to the company's executive director, William Wingate. Wingate did not say how long the troupe would perform in Orange County, nor did he disclose repertory. But he did confirm that the company is involved "in serious talks" to include Costa Mesa on its first West Coast visit since its one-week stint at the Center in October, 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1996 | MIKE CARTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Her mother's peaceful death at age 92 finally got Frances Berenice Schreuder what the murder of her father could not: his money. Or at least what's left of it. Schreuder, a onetime Manhattan socialite and former member of the board of directors of the New York City Ballet, is less than six months from parole after serving 12 years of a life term in Utah State Prison for ordering her son to kill her multimillionaire father, Franklin Bradshaw.
BOOKS
March 19, 1989 | Jack Miles
An admired book of photographs by Walker Evans, one of America's most admired photographers, received its fourth edition recently in conjunction with an Evans exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. "American Photographs" was first published in 1938 when perhaps its greatest impact came less as art than as journalism: It was a stark, deeply moving but utterly unsentimental presentation of rural poverty during the Great Depression.
MAGAZINE
December 6, 1992 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Scot J. Paltrow is a Times staff writer based in New York.
IT WAS ONLY A GLASS OF VODKA THAT HE LIFTED BEFORE A hushed audience at Lincoln Center last year. But for Peter Martins, artistic director and top boss of the New York City Ballet, the shot glass he grasped on stage that evening might as well have been the Holy Grail. The curtain was about to rise on his ambitious restaging of the classic "Sleeping Beauty."
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