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Lincoln Savings Loan Association

BUSINESS
April 5, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Charles H. Keating Jr.'s securities fraud conviction thrown out of state court in a stunning reversal this week, his appeal of a federal racketeering conviction--including a claim of jury misconduct--has suddenly taken on added importance. Now only the federal conviction is keeping the former operator of failed Lincoln Savings & Loan in a prison in Tucson. He is serving a 12-year, seven-month term for looting the Irvine thrift and is not eligible for parole until 2001.
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BUSINESS
April 5, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Charles H. Keating Jr.'s state securities fraud conviction thrown out in a stunning reversal this week, his appeal of a federal racketeering conviction--including a claim of jury misconduct--is taking on added importance. It's now only the federal case that is keeping the former operator of failed Lincoln Savings & Loan in a federal prison in Tucson. He is serving a 12-year, seven-month term for looting the Irvine thrift and is not eligible for parole until 2001.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing flawed jury instructions from Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito, a federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday overturned the state securities fraud conviction of former Lincoln Savings & Loan operator Charles H. Keating Jr., handing state prosecutors a devastating defeat. U.S. District Judge John G. Davies ruled that Keating was denied his constitutional due process rights because his conviction was based on "nonexistent and erroneous legal theory" and "erroneous" jury instructions.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to hear an appeal of a $36.4-million judgment against convicted Lincoln Savings & Loan operator Charles H. Keating Jr., who says he is broke and cannot pay the judgment stemming from one of the nation's most expensive thrift failures. The high court, without comment, denied Keating's final appeal of a decision by the Office of Thrift Supervision that he repay amounts he gained in two illegal deals involving his now-defunct Irvine-based thrift.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
The star prosecution witness in the federal fraud trial of former Lincoln Savings & Loan operator Charles H. Keating Jr. won a court order Monday that frees her from repaying the government $3.5 million. Judith J. Wischer, an accountant who became president of the Irvine thrift's parent company, American Continental Corp. in Phoenix, had been ordered to pay the restitution as part of her sentence after pleading guilty to bank and securities fraud in a plea bargain.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1995 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court, after opening the door slightly to the appeal of convicted thrift defrauder Charles H. Keating Jr., slammed it shut Thursday by reversing itself and saying that its previous decision to hear the appeal was "improvidently granted." The 5-2 vote dashed the short-lived hopes that the former Lincoln Savings & Loan operator held of winning a reversal of his 1991 state securities fraud conviction, for which he is serving a 10-year prison term.
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