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Linda Bloodworth Thomason

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MAGAZINE
September 27, 1992 | MARGY ROCHLIN, Contributing editor Margy Rochlin's last article for this magazine was a profile of actress Julie Kavner. Rochlin is currently working on a radio documentary about the Arizona-Mexico border
UM, DARA? DARA, MAYBE IT'S TIME that you show how you talk to me. . . ." Making the request in her light Missourian drawl is Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, creator, chief writer and executive producer of TV's top-rated "Designing Women" and "Evening Shade." " We love you, Ms. Bloodworth-Thomason, " Dara Monahan, her assistant, recites in an impassioned drone, " and we thank you every day for the jobs which we do not deserve. . .. " Then Monahan dips her head as if in deep prayer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The documentary "Bridegroom," written and directed by Linda Bloodworth-Thomason (of "Designing Women" fame), is a poignant, powerful tale of first love and untimely death as well as a practical, frankly undeniable, plea for marriage equality. Inspired by Shane Bitney Crone's widely seen YouTube video tribute to his late lover Thomas Bridegroom (could that last name be any more serendipitous?), Bloodworth-Thomason deftly tells the absorbing story of Shane and Tom: their red state upbringings (and much of what that may imply)
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To those people in Hollywood who fill up empty computer screens writing comedy and drama, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason is an amazement. She has written 61 "Designing Women" scripts in the past four years, most of them scrawled on yellow legal pads the Saturday and/or Sunday before the first cast rehearsal on Monday. That's like running the three-minute mile in spike heels. "I used to take six to eight hours on a script," she says. "Now I take about 12 to 14 hours. I'm going downhill. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2004 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
For the record, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason says the small Arkansas town in her debut novel, "Liberating Paris," is not her hometown of Poplar Bluff, Mo. Nor is the married doctor, who can't resist a fling with his old flame, based on a certain former U.S. president. And none of the smart steely magnolias in Escada, the warm, sexy men in Armani or the sweet alcoholic relatives who people the novel represent any person, living or dead, including herself. Still.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2004 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
For the record, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason says the small Arkansas town in her debut novel, "Liberating Paris," is not her hometown of Poplar Bluff, Mo. Nor is the married doctor, who can't resist a fling with his old flame, based on a certain former U.S. president. And none of the smart steely magnolias in Escada, the warm, sexy men in Armani or the sweet alcoholic relatives who people the novel represent any person, living or dead, including herself. Still.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1994 | RICK DU BROW
On the verge of wrapping up its third consecutive prime-time ratings championship next weekend, CBS is hoping for some new program magic from two women who helped the network reach the top rung.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the first time Linda Bloodworth-Thomason had been called upon to write a line of dialogue on the spot. But the stakes were higher than usual: This line would not be spoken by one of the characters on her situation comedies, "Designing Women" and "Evening Shade." It would be spoken by Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton at the Democratic National Convention. It was Wednesday night during last week's convention in New York.
OPINION
November 22, 1992 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox News and a contributing reporter to National Public Radio's "Morning Edition." He interviewed Linda Bloodworth-Thomason at her "Hearts Afire" production office in Studio City
She called the film "The Man From Hope." It was an attempt to retool Bill Clinton's image, made by his friend and fellow Arkansan Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, the creator, writer and producer of three hit television series--"Designing Women," "Evening Shade" and "Hearts Afire." She produced the documentary to emphasize, among other things, Clinton's regular-guy-ness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1993 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't expect Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, creator of "Designing Women," "Evening Shade" and "Hearts Afire," to go mouthing off about CBS' cancellation of "Designing Women"--certainly not with the sharp one-liners the show's smart, sassy Southern characters might have come up with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992
In the last few weeks the Opinion section has been graced with the profound thoughts of such deep political thinkers as Barbra Streisand, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason and Spike Lee. Who's next, Macaulay Culkin? ALLEN ESTRIN Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one corner on the set of CBS' "Women of the House" waits Delta Burke, ink-haired and flamboyant in the reprise of her "Designing Women" role as Suzanne Sugarbaker. In this new comedy about the politics and pretensions of Washington, the former beauty queen/interior decorator inherits her late fifth husband's seat in the House of Representatives. He was a Republican, but she, befitting a zany TV persona, is an Independent.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1994 | RICK DU BROW
On the verge of wrapping up its third consecutive prime-time ratings championship next weekend, CBS is hoping for some new program magic from two women who helped the network reach the top rung.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and MELISSA WYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As President Clinton's health care plan recently foundered, sitcom producer Harry Thomason tried to come to the rescue. He created a television commercial spoofing the insurance industry's campaign against the Administration's plan. It was not the first time that Thomason had used his expertise and Hollywood contacts to help his longtime friend from Arkansas at a critical moment.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TV producers Linda Bloodworth-Thomason and Harry Thomason took to the airwaves this week to complain of their "scurrilous" treatment by the press in the White House travel office flap, and to express sympathy for such former presidential intimates as C.G. (Bebe) Rebozo, Bert Lance and Alfred Bloomingdale.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1993 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't expect Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, creator of "Designing Women," "Evening Shade" and "Hearts Afire," to go mouthing off about CBS' cancellation of "Designing Women"--certainly not with the sharp one-liners the show's smart, sassy Southern characters might have come up with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992
In the last few weeks the Opinion section has been graced with the profound thoughts of such deep political thinkers as Barbra Streisand, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason and Spike Lee. Who's next, Macaulay Culkin? ALLEN ESTRIN Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
One Less Woman: Julia Duffy, who plays Allison Sugarbaker on CBS' "Designing Women," will not return to the show next season, series creator and co-executive producer Linda Bloodworth-Thomason said. "No one could have worked harder than Julia," said Bloodworth-Thomason. "But sometimes the chemistry just isn't right." Duffy said in a prepared statement: "Since the character of Allison was so poorly developed, I am not surprised or dismayed at the producers' decision to do away with her."
OPINION
November 22, 1992 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox News and a contributing reporter to National Public Radio's "Morning Edition." He interviewed Linda Bloodworth-Thomason at her "Hearts Afire" production office in Studio City
She called the film "The Man From Hope." It was an attempt to retool Bill Clinton's image, made by his friend and fellow Arkansan Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, the creator, writer and producer of three hit television series--"Designing Women," "Evening Shade" and "Hearts Afire." She produced the documentary to emphasize, among other things, Clinton's regular-guy-ness.
MAGAZINE
November 1, 1992
Let's not prematurely bestow sainthood on Linda Bloodworth-Thomason ("The Prime Time of Linda Bloodworth-Thomason," by Margy Rochlin, Sept. 27). In this town of more than 3 million Latinos, she has shown little or no inclination to dole out TV parts to Latino actors, writers, producers or directors. Her liberalism seems to embrace safe issues: abortion rights, women's rights, backing a safe presidential candidate. She has given a part to an African-American on "Designing Women," but then blacks have been much more visible on TV than Latinos.
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