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Linda Cadwell

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1993 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mother of actor Brandon Lee has filed suit against the Edward R. Pressman Film Corp. and 13 other corporations and individuals, alleging that their negligence was responsible for her son's "agonizing pain, suffering and untimely death" last March on the set of the movie "The Crow."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1993 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mother of actor Brandon Lee has filed suit against the Edward R. Pressman Film Corp. and 13 other corporations and individuals, alleging that their negligence was responsible for her son's "agonizing pain, suffering and untimely death" last March on the set of the movie "The Crow."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1993 | MONICA YANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fans who can't get enough of the late Bruce Lee--who died 20 years ago Tuesday--will soon be able to buy their own piece of the legendary kung fu star's life when more than 150 items from his estate are put on the auction block in August.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1998 | LINDA LEE CADWELL
I was personally offended by Alison Dakota Gee's article about my late husband, Bruce Lee ("Dragon Days," Calendar, July 20). Purporting to commemorate the flourishing of his legacy 25 years after his death, The Times' story sank to the depths of tabloid journalism in sensationalizing the life and death of an extraordinarily gifted human being. Having been married to Bruce for nine years and being the mother of our two children, I am more than qualified to give a correct recital of the facts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Goodby to Lee: Actor Brandon Lee, who was fatally shot during the filming of the action movie "The Crow," was buried next to his father, martial arts star Bruce Lee, in Seattle on Saturday. Brandon Lee's mother, Linda Cadwell, spoke about his life and how he loved his father, said a family friend who attended the private funeral. Lee, 28, died Wednesday after being hit by a .44-caliber slug while filming a death scene.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The word that came up repeatedly at the premiere of Universal's "Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story" Wednesday at Mann's Chinese was bittersweet . Tempering the celebration was the March 31 death of Lee's son Brandon on a North Carolina film set. The evening was most poignant for Brandon's mother and Lee's widow, Linda Lee Cadwell. The film is based on her book, "Bruce Lee: The Man Only I Knew."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | Jane Galbraith
Here's the cameo surprise of the big screen. The Green Hornet is back--directing the action in a scene-within-a-scene from "Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story." That's right, trivia fans, it's Van Williams, the original Green Hornet from the 1966 television series that co-starred martial arts expert Lee as his sidekick, Kato. (How could we forget, "Faster, Kato!"?
NATIONAL
December 26, 2007 | Tomas Alex Tizon, Times Staff Writer
When she closes her eyes, college sophomore Courtney Ioane can visualize the statue of Bruce Lee that she wants erected on the University of Washington campus. It is bronze and life-size -- not so big that it dominates the area but substantial enough to be noticed. And the legendary fighter and movie star would not be punching or kicking but sitting in a meditative pose. "Bruce Lee was more than a martial artist," said Ioane, 20. "He also had an amazing philosophy of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The problem with most movie biographies of famous stars is that the wattage of the impersonators is rarely as bright as the originals. The exceptions--Barbra Streisand as Fanny Brice, for example, or James Cagney as George M. Cohan--only prove the rule. What's exciting about "Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story" (citywide) is that, in Jason Scott Lee, the movies have created a new star out of an old star.
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