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Linda Chatman Thomsen

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BUSINESS
May 13, 2005 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission named Linda Chatman Thomsen as chief of its enforcement division Thursday, making her the first woman to head the unit at the forefront of the agency's corporate-fraud crackdown. Thomsen, who was the division's second-ranking official, succeeds Stephen Cutler, who said last month that he would return to the private sector. Thomsen, 50, joined the agency a decade ago and rose steadily through the enforcement unit.
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BUSINESS
May 13, 2005 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission named Linda Chatman Thomsen as chief of its enforcement division Thursday, making her the first woman to head the unit at the forefront of the agency's corporate-fraud crackdown. Thomsen, who was the division's second-ranking official, succeeds Stephen Cutler, who said last month that he would return to the private sector. Thomsen, 50, joined the agency a decade ago and rose steadily through the enforcement unit.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2005 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Sandra J. Harris, a top enforcement lawyer at the Securities and Exchange Commission's Los Angeles office since 1994, is leaving at the end of September to pursue a career in the private sector, the agency said Monday. Harris, 47, said she hadn't decided yet where she would land, but was ready to move on after 18 years at the SEC.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Tyco International Ltd. agreed Monday to pay the Securities and Exchange Commission a $50-million civil penalty to settle allegations the high-tech conglomerate's previous management violated securities laws, cooked the books and overstated financial results by at least $1 billion. Under the proposed settlement, filed in U.S.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Since 2002, defrauded investors have received only about 1% of the billions of dollars collected for them by securities regulators, congressional auditors have found. Congress' Government Accountability Office, in a report released Monday, said the Securities and Exchange Commission has taken in more than $4.8 billion in civil fines and restitution in settlements with companies and individuals during that period.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2008 | Chuck Neubauer, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission charged former Democratic fundraiser Norman Hsu with operating a $60-million Ponzi scheme in a civil lawsuit filed Monday in Los Angeles. Hsu, one of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's biggest fundraisers, is in federal custody, awaiting trial on criminal charges that he defrauded investors out of millions in the scam and that he made illegal campaign contributions to Clinton and others. The SEC wants Hsu and his company, Next Components Ltd.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Federal securities regulators charged auto parts giant Delphi Corp. and 13 individuals Monday with scheming to hide the poor condition of the company's finances from 2000 to 2004. Delphi and six of the individuals simultaneously settled the charges, the Securities and Exchange Commission said in a complaint filed in federal court in Detroit. The case against the seven other people is pending. Delphi, the nation's largest auto parts supplier, filed for bankruptcy protection in October 2005.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Scrambling to defuse a 1st Amendment issue, the Securities and Exchange Commission instructed its staff Thursday to prepare guidelines for demanding information from journalists whose work may be of interest to investigators. The commission move came less than a week after disclosures that the SEC had issued a subpoena to two writers for Dow Jones & Co. online publications -- a move by agency enforcers that caught Chairman Christopher Cox off guard.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Securities regulators on Monday sanctioned Los Angeles-based investment firm Crowell, Weedon & Co., saying it violated customer identification requirements mandated by the Patriot Act. The Securities and Exchange Commission said the action was its first enforcement of rules designed to protect the financial system from money laundering and terrorism, although no such crimes were alleged in this case.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2007 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Two Silicon Valley companies, including a unit of Hewlett-Packard Co., have been fined a total of $35 million for alleged manipulation of stock options, marking a new phase in the government's more-than-yearlong investigation of such conduct. The Securities and Exchange Commission announced Thursday that San Jose-based Brocade Communications Systems Inc. and HP's Mercury Interactive unit had become the first firms to be fined in the SEC's crackdown on option backdating.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Christopher Cox distanced himself Monday from the decision of SEC enforcement officials to subpoena two journalists and said the agency would review the matter as early as this week. SEC investigators on Friday backed away from their demand that two business writers employed by Dow Jones & Co. turn over their phone and e-mail records.
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