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Linda Chavez Thompson

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OPINION
February 4, 1996 | Harry Bernstein, Harry Bernstein covered labor issues for The Times for 32 years. He interviewed Linda Chavez Thompson by phone from her office in Washington, D.C
Linda Chavez Thompson's election to the new position of AFL-CIO executive vice president ended the historic hold of white males on the top jobs in the American labor movement. She campaigned for the post by calling for major changes in the structure and tactics of the federation and, when elected last October, she told the union convention, "The face of labor is changing, and you can tell this by the mere fact that I am a woman--and a woman of color." But Thompson, 50, is not new to unions.
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OPINION
February 4, 1996 | Harry Bernstein, Harry Bernstein covered labor issues for The Times for 32 years. He interviewed Linda Chavez Thompson by phone from her office in Washington, D.C
Linda Chavez Thompson's election to the new position of AFL-CIO executive vice president ended the historic hold of white males on the top jobs in the American labor movement. She campaigned for the post by calling for major changes in the structure and tactics of the federation and, when elected last October, she told the union convention, "The face of labor is changing, and you can tell this by the mere fact that I am a woman--and a woman of color." But Thompson, 50, is not new to unions.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out at the packed convention floor of union officials assembled before her Thursday morning, Linda Chavez-Thompson figured she'd warm up the crowd with a favorite ploy. Beaming, the newly installed AFL-CIO executive vice president gently prodded her audience to greet her in Spanish: " Buenos dias ." With that stroke, Chavez-Thompson--whose election Wednesday made her the highest-ranking nonwhite in the history of the American labor federation--wasn't just lightening the mood.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out at the packed convention floor of union officials assembled before her Thursday morning, Linda Chavez-Thompson figured she'd warm up the crowd with a favorite ploy. Beaming, the newly installed AFL-CIO executive vice president gently prodded her audience to greet her in Spanish: " Buenos dias ." With that stroke, Chavez-Thompson--whose election Wednesday made her the highest-ranking nonwhite in the history of the American labor federation--wasn't just lightening the mood.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | Associated Press
A group promoting women in politics is asking the country to determine which women would be capable of running for president. The White House Project on Thursday announced plans to mail 1 million ballots listing 20 prominent women and asking people to pick five they think are capable of seeking the White House. The group also plans to place ballots in such magazines as Parade, Glamour, Jane, Essence and People and on its Web site: www.thewhitehouseproject.
NEWS
June 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
President Clinton opened a yearlong initiative on race relations Thursday by appointing a board to advise him on the divisive issue. The diverse panel of three whites, two blacks, one Latino and one Korean American will be chaired by prominent black historian John Hope Franklin, 82. A staff of 15 to 20 federal employees will run the operation. The board's first chore will be helping Clinton polish a Saturday commencement address that aides hope will serve as a hallmark of his presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1997
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Evans & Novak": Rep. J.C. Watts (R-Okla.), 2:30 p.m., repeats Sunday, 7 a.m. CNN. "Capital Gang Saturday": Rep. Floyd Flake (D-N.Y.), 4 and 10:30 p.m. CNN. "Inside Politics Weekend": Race in America, 3:30 p.m.; repeats midnight CNN. "The McLaughlin Group": Diaster relief bill; tax proposal, 6:30 p.m. (4). Sunday "Sunday Journal": 5 a.m. C-SPAN.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1997 | LEE HARRIS
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Saturday Journal": 5 a.m. C-SPAN. "Evans & Novak": Marion Barry, mayor of Washington, D.C., 2:30 p.m., repeats Sunday, 7 a.m. CNN. "John McLaughlin's One on One": Michael Bloomberg, 2:30 p.m. (28). "Tony Brown's Journal": roots of music featuring black hymns, slave songs, 3:30 p.m. (28). "Inside Politics Weekend": 3:30 p.m.; repeats midnight CNN. "Capital Gang Saturday": Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Md.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's new Social Security commission will mount an aggressive campaign to convince Americans that the retirement system can't keep its promises to future generations unless it allows them to invest some of their own tax payments in personal mutual fund accounts. Social Security "is structurally broken," Richard Parsons, the commission's co-chairman, said Monday at its first meeting. "It cannot work anymore in the way it is set up."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1996 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,000 people and scores of political leaders gathered at a Labor Day celebration in downtown Los Angeles on Monday to herald the resurgence of organized labor and support delivery drivers on strike at Southern California's largest tortilla company. "I have a message for everyone here and for everyone all the way back to the East Coast: Working people are not going to take it anymore," said AFL-CIO Executive Vice President Linda Chavez Thompson, who spoke at the rally.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to blunt a dissident group's historic effort to seize control of the American union movement, embattled AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland announced plans Monday to resign Aug. 1 in hopes of opening the way for his longtime second in command, Thomas R. Donahue, to take the organization's reins. The move was designed to try to give Donahue, 66, the top job on an interim basis and thus boost his chances of winning election in late October to a regular two-year term.
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