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Linda Culbertson

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February 3, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ana Espinoza became a prostitute before she was old enough to drive. She started at 14, after she ran away from home or her mother kicked her out--she's not sure anymore. Now 22 and in jail, she's desperate to leave, desperate to find another way to live. At least that's what she is telling Linda Culbertson, who sits on a hard wooden stool in the Sybil Brand women's jail near downtown Los Angeles, listening, staring intently.
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NEWS
February 3, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ana Espinoza became a prostitute before she was old enough to drive. She started at 14, after she ran away from home or her mother kicked her out; she's not sure anymore. Espinoza is now 22 and in jail, desperate to leave, desperate to find another way of living. At least that's what she is telling Linda Culbertson. Culbertson is sitting on a hard wooden stool in the Sybil Brand women's jail near downtown Los Angeles, listening, staring intently.
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NEWS
February 3, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ana Espinoza became a prostitute before she was old enough to drive. She started at 14, after she ran away from home or her mother kicked her out; she's not sure anymore. Espinoza is now 22 and in jail, desperate to leave, desperate to find another way of living. At least that's what she is telling Linda Culbertson. Culbertson is sitting on a hard wooden stool in the Sybil Brand women's jail near downtown Los Angeles, listening, staring intently.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ana Espinoza became a prostitute before she was old enough to drive. She started at 14, after she ran away from home or her mother kicked her out--she's not sure anymore. Now 22 and in jail, she's desperate to leave, desperate to find another way to live. At least that's what she is telling Linda Culbertson, who sits on a hard wooden stool in the Sybil Brand women's jail near downtown Los Angeles, listening, staring intently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1988
Joseph Bell really captured the spirit of Judge David Carter (Orange County Life, Jan. 16). Parents Who Care and the PTA of Corona del Mar had a drug and alcohol program that brought Judge Carter to our school. The audience was spellbound as they listened to three inmates from prison relate their stories to the student body. Along the same lines of bruised kids, I recently found myself at Juvenile Hall, where I am working in photography to bring attention to some of the needs of these teens in detention.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
At San Jacinto United Methodist Church, lay leader Jackie Harry rises one recent Sunday morning to report on a Methodist district meeting she attended a day earlier. "It turned out to be an opportunity for the gay rights movement to get a foothold," she tells her fellow congregants, who quickly fall silent. "They want to incorporate the gay people into our church and let them be ministers," she says. "God expects us to give up the sin in our lives--and we believe that homosexuality is a sin."
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