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Linda Dishman

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OPINION
October 17, 2012 | Patt Morrison
Been to a concert at the Wiltern? Toured downtown's movie palaces? Love the Central Library? You can thank the Los Angeles Conservancy that they're still here. And for 20 of the conservancy's 34 years, Linda Dishman has been its executive director, fighting the wrecking ball and trying to keep historic buildings from being threatened in the first place. The organization's nearly 7,000 members make it the biggest local preservation group in the country, and proof that Angelenos see plenty worth preserving in what people too often think of as a tear-down city.
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OPINION
October 17, 2012 | Patt Morrison
Been to a concert at the Wiltern? Toured downtown's movie palaces? Love the Central Library? You can thank the Los Angeles Conservancy that they're still here. And for 20 of the conservancy's 34 years, Linda Dishman has been its executive director, fighting the wrecking ball and trying to keep historic buildings from being threatened in the first place. The organization's nearly 7,000 members make it the biggest local preservation group in the country, and proof that Angelenos see plenty worth preserving in what people too often think of as a tear-down city.
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REAL ESTATE
March 8, 1992
Linda Dishman has been selected as the new executive director of the Los Angeles Conservancy. Her duties as head of the largest nonprofit historic preservation organization in the West begin on Monday. Previously an architectural historian with the National Park Service and a senior planner for the city of Pasadena, Dishman has been a preservation professional for more than a decade.
HOME & GARDEN
August 22, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Architects in Southern California often look to the indoor-outdoor designs of the late trailblazing modernist Richard Neutra for inspiration. John Bertram need not look far. The 43-year-old principal of Bertram Architects lives in a Neutra: the 1939 McIntosh house. Waking up every morning in a house designed by the architect who has most influenced him has been a boon for Bertram, whose portfolio includes million-dollar restorations and renovations of four historic Neutra homes, including the Brown house in Bel-Air owned by former Gucci designer Tom Ford.
OPINION
January 16, 2000
Contrary to Shawn Hubler's assertion (Jan. 10), the Los Angeles Unified School District does not face a stark choice between new school facilities and preservation of the historic Ambassador Hotel on Wilshire Boulevard. It can have both. A comprehensive reuse study prepared for LAUSD indicated that LAUSD can feasibly build a school utilizing portions of the historic hotel. In all of the options studied, the costs of rehabilitation were significantly less than the costs of new school construction.
NEWS
June 16, 2005 | Robin Rauzi
Linda DISHMAN started trying to save Los Angeles as soon as she moved here. As the executive director of the Los Angeles Conservancy, she has worked for 13 years to preserve the area's historic sites and teach Angelenos about their architectural treasures. She and her husband, John Hinrichs, recently bought a house in the Silver Lake area, so in their free time they enjoy exploring the new neighborhood.
HOME & GARDEN
August 22, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Architects in Southern California often look to the indoor-outdoor designs of the late trailblazing modernist Richard Neutra for inspiration. John Bertram need not look far. The 43-year-old principal of Bertram Architects lives in a Neutra: the 1939 McIntosh house. Waking up every morning in a house designed by the architect who has most influenced him has been a boon for Bertram, whose portfolio includes million-dollar restorations and renovations of four historic Neutra homes, including the Brown house in Bel-Air owned by former Gucci designer Tom Ford.
MAGAZINE
October 1, 2006 | Emily Young, Emily Young, a former editor for the Los Angeles Times Magazine, is now a contributing writer for Los Angeles magazine.
Question: When did L.A. get serious about adaptive reuse? Answer: As part of a revitalization effort, the Adaptive Reuse Ordinance approved by the City Council in 1999 made it easier to convert vacant and underutilized buildings downtown to new uses. Until then, industrial and commercial buildings could be converted to residential spaces only for artists' lofts. What the ordinance did was streamline the process and allow anyone, not just artists, to live and work in these buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000
Santa Anita racetrack was named Monday as one of the 11 most endangered historic sites by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. At a news conference across the street from the track, Linda Dishman, the conservancy's executive director, said a proposal by the new owner to make major changes at the track "would obliterate everything you see . . . for a Caesar's Palace facade and a wild hokey town."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1996
A peace conference of sorts was held Friday between church officials and architectural preservationists on the fate of St. Vibiana's Cathedral, the downtown Los Angeles landmark that the Roman Catholic archdiocese wants to demolish and replace. The conference produced no decision about the fate of the 120-year-old cathedral and participants said they did not expect a breakthrough at a final session today.
MAGAZINE
October 1, 2006 | Emily Young, Emily Young, a former editor for the Los Angeles Times Magazine, is now a contributing writer for Los Angeles magazine.
Question: When did L.A. get serious about adaptive reuse? Answer: As part of a revitalization effort, the Adaptive Reuse Ordinance approved by the City Council in 1999 made it easier to convert vacant and underutilized buildings downtown to new uses. Until then, industrial and commercial buildings could be converted to residential spaces only for artists' lofts. What the ordinance did was streamline the process and allow anyone, not just artists, to live and work in these buildings.
NEWS
June 16, 2005 | Robin Rauzi
Linda DISHMAN started trying to save Los Angeles as soon as she moved here. As the executive director of the Los Angeles Conservancy, she has worked for 13 years to preserve the area's historic sites and teach Angelenos about their architectural treasures. She and her husband, John Hinrichs, recently bought a house in the Silver Lake area, so in their free time they enjoy exploring the new neighborhood.
OPINION
January 16, 2000
Contrary to Shawn Hubler's assertion (Jan. 10), the Los Angeles Unified School District does not face a stark choice between new school facilities and preservation of the historic Ambassador Hotel on Wilshire Boulevard. It can have both. A comprehensive reuse study prepared for LAUSD indicated that LAUSD can feasibly build a school utilizing portions of the historic hotel. In all of the options studied, the costs of rehabilitation were significantly less than the costs of new school construction.
REAL ESTATE
March 8, 1992
Linda Dishman has been selected as the new executive director of the Los Angeles Conservancy. Her duties as head of the largest nonprofit historic preservation organization in the West begin on Monday. Previously an architectural historian with the National Park Service and a senior planner for the city of Pasadena, Dishman has been a preservation professional for more than a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996
The Los Angeles Conservancy gained an important victory Thursday when a Superior Court judge ruled that the preservationist organization's own inspectors can examine seismic damage at St. Vibiana's Cathedral in downtown Los Angeles. Judge Robert O'Brien also refused a request from the city and the Roman Catholic archdiocese to shorten his temporary ban on the razing of the church's bell tower. A full hearing is still scheduled for June 17.
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