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Linda Finch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1997 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, a plane, a pilot, and a dream. And once again, the world is watching and hoping. In 1937, the pilot was Amelia Earhart, a pioneer of aviation whose plane vanished over the Pacific during a flight around the world, creating a mystery that has engendered a stream of books and articles purporting to explain it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1997
Re "Pilot Sets Out to Finish What Earhart Started," March 18. Seeing Linda Finch come out of the sky at Burbank Airport in a vintage Electra 10E to recreate [Amelia Earhart's] fatal flight of 1937 was historically inspiring. It restores Earhart's place in history as a role model for generations past and future and reestablishes her dominance as the greatest women flier of her day and perhaps forever. She was a woman of bravery and courage, a symbol to the ladies of that day and today to reach for the extraordinary as she did. Earhart's history in the San Fernando Valley runs deep.
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NEWS
March 18, 1997 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, a plane, a pilot and a dream. And once again the world is watching and hoping. In 1937 the pilot was Amelia Earhart, a pioneer of aviation who vanished with her plane during a flight around the world, creating a mystery that has captivated the American psyche for decades and led to a stream of books and articles purporting to explain it.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, a plane, a pilot and a dream. And once again the world is watching and hoping. In 1937 the pilot was Amelia Earhart, a pioneer of aviation who vanished with her plane during a flight around the world, creating a mystery that has captivated the American psyche for decades and led to a stream of books and articles purporting to explain it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1997
Re "Pilot Sets Out to Finish What Earhart Started," March 18. Seeing Linda Finch come out of the sky at Burbank Airport in a vintage Electra 10E to recreate [Amelia Earhart's] fatal flight of 1937 was historically inspiring. It restores Earhart's place in history as a role model for generations past and future and reestablishes her dominance as the greatest women flier of her day and perhaps forever. She was a woman of bravery and courage, a symbol to the ladies of that day and today to reach for the extraordinary as she did. Earhart's history in the San Fernando Valley runs deep.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
With hundreds of cheering well-wishers lining the taxiway of Miami's Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport, Linda Finch, the Texas businesswoman and aviator who is retracing the round-the-world route Amelia Earhart attempted to fly, took off on the first over-water leg of her journey. Her 1935 Lockheed Electra 10E--the same model Earhart flew in 1937--carried the 46-year-old Finch and navigator Bob Fodge toward Puerto Rico.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
Following her own "yellow brick road in the sky," Texas pilot Linda Finch touched down at Oakland International Airport on Wednesday, ending a 2 1/2-month round-the-world flight Amelia Earhart couldn't complete 60 years ago. Finch, a 46-year-old San Antonio businesswoman, landed her gleaming twin-engine Lockheed Electra 10-E at 9:23 a.m. after flying the little plane almost 26,000 miles around the equator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1999
I am upset with Gustav Lopez's Nov. 23 letter. I really don't believe U.S. citizens think Mexico's drinking and driving laws are any different. There is one major difference [when] driving under the influence of alcohol on U.S. highways and in Mexico. In the U.S. one can drive illegally without insurance, get free medical care if necessary, then sue the restaurant or bar that served you and go home rich. In Mexico you go straight to jail and there is no medical care with or without money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1997 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, a plane, a pilot, and a dream. And once again, the world is watching and hoping. In 1937, the pilot was Amelia Earhart, a pioneer of aviation whose plane vanished over the Pacific during a flight around the world, creating a mystery that has engendered a stream of books and articles purporting to explain it.
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