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Linda Kelm

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November 11, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Linda Kelm, replacing an indisposed colleague on less than a week's notice in Janacek's "Glagolitic" Mass, this weekend, says she will have no problem "bringing it back." "I remember music. I don't remember people, their names or their faces, sometimes, and I forget other things. But music, I remember. It stays with me." Kelm has risen quickly with a small repertory. On stage, she has sung the three "Ring" Brunnhildes and Turandot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Linda Kelm, replacing an indisposed colleague on less than a week's notice in Janacek's "Glagolitic" Mass, this weekend, says she will have no problem "bringing it back." "I remember music. I don't remember people, their names or their faces, sometimes, and I forget other things. But music, I remember. It stays with me." Kelm has risen quickly with a small repertory. On stage, she has sung the three "Ring" Brunnhildes and Turandot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1988 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Simon Rattle holds a nice title. The program magazine at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion officially lists him as principal guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Nevertheless, the relationship between the dynamic British maestro and our uneven orchestra has been a bit tenuous in recent seasons. Title or no title, we don't get to see nearly enough of Rattle. That was all too clear Friday night.
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October 17, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
When opera is done well, there is nothing quite like it. It is exciting, uplifting, ennobling. When opera is done badly, there is nothing more ludicrous. The production of Puccini's "Turandot" assembled by Terence McEwen at the War Memorial Opera House in 1982 must be the silliest thing this side of the Marx Brothers' "Trovatore," and at least the Marxists were trying to be funny.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
It began more than a dozen years ago when Glynn Ross--the Barnum and the Bailey, too, of Seattle Opera--decided to give the Pacific Northwest a taste of Wagnerian music drama. Actually, it wasn't just a taste. It was the taste: "Der Ring des Nibelungen." The whole, convoluted, gnarled, rambling, massive, heroic, whopping, galumphing, thrilling thing, in all its 16-hour, four-part splendor. Ross was no avant-gardist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
Manuel Rosenthal took a bow in the pit of the darkened Opera House just before the beginning of the third act of "Siegfried." All conductors of the sprawling "Ring" tetralogy get ovations. Rosenthal got a super-ovation. The little man deserved it--for sheer endurance, if nothing else. Wagner's convoluted, mystical and mythological cycle does go on and on--for nearly 17 heavily orchestrated hours--and it makes severe demands on the man in the pit.
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