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Linda Lavin

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The best showbiz careers are unpredictable. Longevity, one index of success, entails a flair for reinvention. Resting on one's laurels, as any longstanding "somebody" can tell you, is the quickest way of summoning the hook. Linda Lavin, currently making eccentric comic mischief in Jon Robin Baitz's "Other Desert Cities" at Lincoln Center's Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, has gone from chorus girl to sitcom star to Tony-winning stage veteran in a wild professional ride that no fortune teller could have foretold.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2013 | By Susan King
Linda Lavin is getting the hang of Twitter. She's been practicing on Thursday nights when she tweets during both East and West coast airings of NBC's sitcom "Sean Saves the World. " In the series Lavin plays Lorna, the loving, albeit pushy, mother of Sean Harrison (Sean Hayes of "Will & Grace"), a gay divorced father with a demanding job who is now full-time dad to his 14-year-old daughter (Samantha Isler). "I'm getting a lot of response," said the vivacious, petite actress, an age-defying 76, about her tweets.
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NEWS
May 21, 1999 | IRENE LACHER, Los Angeles Times
Here's the ladies' room review of Donald Margulies' "Collected Stories" at the Geffen Playhouse. The opening-night consensus among women powdering their noses was: Who knew Linda Lavin was such a powerful actor? All of New York, actually. Lavin has been a significant presence in New York theater for years, scoring her third Tony nomination for "The Diary of Anne Frank" last year. She is making her stage debut in Los Angeles with her portrayal of the literary lion who roars in "Collected Stories."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Oct. 6 - 12, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES The Big Bang Theory Sheldon (Jim Parsons) wants revenge after Amy (Mayim Bialik) ruins one of his favorite films in this new episode. 8 p.m. CBS Parks and Recreation Ben and Chris (Adam Scott, Rob Lowe) reunite to work on an accounting project.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012
The track record of adapting hit films into TV series has been spotty at best. For every small screen success such as CBS' "MASH," there have been such turkeys as the recent NBC series "The Firm. " The stars aligned for CBS in 1976 with the sitcom "Alice," a warmly funny adaptation of Martin Scorsese's 1974 "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore," for which Ellen Burstyn won the Oscar as a widower with a young son who ends up working at a greasy spoon named Mel's. Warner Archive just released the first season on DVD. Linda Lavin was perfectly cast as Alice, as were Polly Holliday and Beth Howland as waitresses Flo and Vera.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles seems to be enjoying a mini-trend in the theater these days: two-character battles of wit in which one of those wits is a famous writer. In two different plays on two local stages, a writer clashes with another character over the role of truth in fiction.
NEWS
February 2, 1986
"Maricela" (on KCET) was realistic, touching and very appropriate. Linda Lavin, Lisa Marie Simmon and Carlina Cruz were wonderful. My only regret? Although I knew that Stacy (Simmon) and Maricela (Cruz) better understood each other at the end and that a friendship had been formed, I wanted to see it! Why couldn't the show have been longer? Anne Slattery, Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1999
Stage and screen actress Linda Lavin will be interviewed in the Skirball Cultural Center's next "Spotlight" event, "Television and Society," hosted by author and arts reporter Barbara Isenberg at the center on June 7 at 7:30 p.m. "Spotlight" is a continuing series of interviews exploring the contemporary arts landscape with artists and arts leaders. The Skirball Center is at 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Tickets are $12. Information: (323) 655-8587.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press.
Lavin Pacts With ABC: Linda Lavin, who spent nine years as "Alice" on CBS, will be back on TV come fall in a new half-hour comedy series for ABC. In the still-to-be titled show, Lavin will be cast as a recently widowed mother with an adult daughter. Lavin describes the series as "a story of recovery . . . a story of coming from a dysfunctional to a functional relationship, exploring what a mother and daughter can be to each other as individuals beyond mother and daughter."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Linda Lavin goes dowdy--but, naturally, wiseacre dowdy--in "Room for Two," a sitcom getting a tryout tonight in the coveted post-"Roseanne" slot (9:30 p.m. on ABC, Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42). Not only that, but she gets a dandy doppelganger in the form of daughter Patricia Heaton, a strong foil for Mom's slightly adversarial affection.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012
The track record of adapting hit films into TV series has been spotty at best. For every small screen success such as CBS' "MASH," there have been such turkeys as the recent NBC series "The Firm. " The stars aligned for CBS in 1976 with the sitcom "Alice," a warmly funny adaptation of Martin Scorsese's 1974 "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore," for which Ellen Burstyn won the Oscar as a widower with a young son who ends up working at a greasy spoon named Mel's. Warner Archive just released the first season on DVD. Linda Lavin was perfectly cast as Alice, as were Polly Holliday and Beth Howland as waitresses Flo and Vera.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The best showbiz careers are unpredictable. Longevity, one index of success, entails a flair for reinvention. Resting on one's laurels, as any longstanding "somebody" can tell you, is the quickest way of summoning the hook. Linda Lavin, currently making eccentric comic mischief in Jon Robin Baitz's "Other Desert Cities" at Lincoln Center's Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, has gone from chorus girl to sitcom star to Tony-winning stage veteran in a wild professional ride that no fortune teller could have foretold.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles seems to be enjoying a mini-trend in the theater these days: two-character battles of wit in which one of those wits is a famous writer. In two different plays on two local stages, a writer clashes with another character over the role of truth in fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1999
Stage and screen actress Linda Lavin will be interviewed in the Skirball Cultural Center's next "Spotlight" event, "Television and Society," hosted by author and arts reporter Barbara Isenberg at the center on June 7 at 7:30 p.m. "Spotlight" is a continuing series of interviews exploring the contemporary arts landscape with artists and arts leaders. The Skirball Center is at 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Tickets are $12. Information: (323) 655-8587.
NEWS
May 21, 1999 | IRENE LACHER, Los Angeles Times
Here's the ladies' room review of Donald Margulies' "Collected Stories" at the Geffen Playhouse. The opening-night consensus among women powdering their noses was: Who knew Linda Lavin was such a powerful actor? All of New York, actually. Lavin has been a significant presence in New York theater for years, scoring her third Tony nomination for "The Diary of Anne Frank" last year. She is making her stage debut in Los Angeles with her portrayal of the literary lion who roars in "Collected Stories."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Linda Lavin goes dowdy--but, naturally, wiseacre dowdy--in "Room for Two," a sitcom getting a tryout tonight in the coveted post-"Roseanne" slot (9:30 p.m. on ABC, Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42). Not only that, but she gets a dandy doppelganger in the form of daughter Patricia Heaton, a strong foil for Mom's slightly adversarial affection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1987 | NANCY MILLS
Linda Lavin likes playing women "who walk through fire and come out standing up," she says. So when she got a call asking her if she would like to go to Australia and learn how to herd sheep, she immediately said yes. "A Place to Call Home," Lavin's new movie for CBS, airing tonight at 9 on Channels 2 and 8, is not really about how to keep sheep. The point of the telefilm, which Lavin produced, is to show how a family can pull together in a crisis.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Lavin is becoming the mother of all mothers. From 1976 to '85, she starred as Alice Hyatt, the widowed mother of a young son who worked as a waitress in Mel's Diner on the hit CBS series "Alice." In 1986, she won a Tony Award as the world-weary matriarch of the Jerome family in Neil Simon's award-winning "Broadway Bound." Two years ago she starred on Broadway as the ultimate stage mother, Mama Rose, in the revival of "Gypsy."
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Lavin is becoming the mother of all mothers. From 1976 to '85, she starred as Alice Hyatt, the widowed mother of a young son who worked as a waitress in Mel's Diner on the hit CBS series "Alice." In 1986, she won a Tony Award as the world-weary matriarch of the Jerome family in Neil Simon's award-winning "Broadway Bound." Two years ago she starred on Broadway as the ultimate stage mother, Mama Rose, in the revival of "Gypsy."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press.
Lavin Pacts With ABC: Linda Lavin, who spent nine years as "Alice" on CBS, will be back on TV come fall in a new half-hour comedy series for ABC. In the still-to-be titled show, Lavin will be cast as a recently widowed mother with an adult daughter. Lavin describes the series as "a story of recovery . . . a story of coming from a dysfunctional to a functional relationship, exploring what a mother and daughter can be to each other as individuals beyond mother and daughter."
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