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Linda Ronstadt

ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Among the many observations both endearing and illuminating in Linda Ronstadt's new memoir, “Simple Dreams” (Simon & Schuster, $25), which arrives Tuesday, Sept. 17, is the moment she recalls discovering her calling in life. “I can remember sitting at the piano,” she writes in the first chapter of the 242-page book. “My sister was playing and my brother was singing something, and I said, 'I want to try that.' My sister turned to my brother and said, 'Think we got a soprano here.' … I remember thinking, 'I'm a singer, that's what I do.' It was like I had become validated somehow, my existence affirmed.” She was 4. That moment of clarity didn't have anything to do with the worldwide fame Ronstadt would achieve as one of the most powerfully emotive singers of her generation, or the 10 Grammy Awards she eventually would win for a remarkably varied career spanning country and rock, classic pop and traditional Mexican folk music, opera and Broadway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | By Anthony York
Linda Ronstadt's new memoir recounts her decades-long career in music and chronicles her current battle with Parkinson's disease. But the autobiography of the former Stone Poney's frontwoman is also peppered with references to her former beau, Gov. Jerry Brown. Ronstadt recounts a time during the winter of 1979 when she was “keeping company” with the then-41-year-old governor when a series of winter storms threatened to wipe out her Malibu Colony home. “The newspapers had begun to speculate on whether the governor was going to spend state money to protect his girlfriend's house,” Ronstadt writes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Linda Ronstadt, who recently went public with her diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, will appear in Los Angeles next month to talk about her upcoming memoir. Parkinson's has taken away her ability to sing, but she still plans to talk about her book, "Simple Dreams. " Ronstadt will appear at the literary speakers series Writers Bloc in conversation with Patt Morrison. Tickets to the event, which will be held Sept. 24 in Santa Monica, are $25. "Simple Dreams: A Musical Memoir" includes her personal history, stories of her loves and friendships, and the stories behind some of her songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Singer Linda Ronstadt says she has Parkinson's disease and can no longer sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an AARP Magazine interview posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said. “No matter how hard you try.” Ronstadt said that she uses poles to help walk and uses a wheelchair when traveling.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Linda Ronstadt has disclosed that she is suffering from Parkinson's disease , and that the neurological disorder has left her unable to sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an  AARP Magazine interview  posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
TUCSON - Sitting on a swivel bar stool near the kitchen of her home outside Tucson, Suzy Horton Ronstadt listened to the familiar words of songwriter Jimmy Webb's pop-rock classic "MacArthur Park. " Ronstadt smiled at first, then had to blink as her blue eyes welled up at the line "After all the loves of my life, you'll still be the one. " But unlike countless listeners who've shed a tear or two over the anguished romanticism of that sentiment since actor-singer Richard Harris took it to the top of the pop charts in 1968, Ronstadt has a special attachment to the song.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Sunday night's performance by Tucson, Ariz.-based pop-folk vocal quartet I Hear Voices! at McCabe's in Santa Monica is more than just another gig for guitarist, songwriter and singer Bobby Kimmel, the group's nominal leader. Kimmel played a crucial role in getting live music started at the venerated folk club more than 40 years ago. At that time, Kimmel was a member of the Stone Poneys, the L.A. country-rock group that was the springboard to stardom for its lead singer, Linda Ronstadt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
When Bob Hare opened his Hermosa Beach coffeehouse in 1958, he called it the Insomniac because it was open until 3 a.m. He brewed his coffee in a 300-pound dry-cleaning boiler and served it to such high-profile members of the Beat Generation as Allen Ginsberg and Lenny Bruce, he later recalled. The coffeehouse also became a haven for folk and blues musicians and other performers. Ginsberg read his poem "Howl" and a 16-year-old Linda Ronstadt sang, Hare said in 1992 in The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011
Linda Ronstadt broke barriers for women as one of the top-selling artists of her generation, and she's going to detail how she did it in a new memoir for Simon & Schuster. The book publisher announced Thursday that it had acquired her autobiography, titled "Heart Like a Wheel," after her Grammy-winning, multiplatinum album. Ronstadt sold tens of millions of records starting in the 1970s with pop hits such as "You're No Good" and "When Will I Be Loved. " But she also segued into country, pop standards and mariachi music, among other genres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2011 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Andrew Gold, a singer, songwriter and versatile musician who had a Top 10 hit in 1977 with "Lonely Boy" and was a vital component of Linda Ronstadt's pop success in the 1970s as a member of her band, has died. He was 59. Gold died Friday in his sleep at his home in Encino, said his sister, Melani Gold Friedman. He had cancer but had been responding well to treatment, she said. He played several instruments, did arrangements and sang on such Ronstadt albums as "Heart Like a Wheel" in 1974, "Prisoner in Disguise" in 1975 and "Hasten Down the Wind" in 1976.
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