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Linda Schuyler

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Oh, Canada, so near and yet so far. We share a language, albeit with different notions of how to pronounce "sorry" and "about"; we use your streets and your studios to stand in for America in our budget-conscious television shows, and your actors to represent Americans, and your film crews to record them. And yet your own television is something quite different. "The L.A. Complex," which premieres Tuesday on the CW, is a Canadian youth-soap from Martin Gero (a veteran of"Bored to Death")
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Oh, Canada, so near and yet so far. We share a language, albeit with different notions of how to pronounce "sorry" and "about"; we use your streets and your studios to stand in for America in our budget-conscious television shows, and your actors to represent Americans, and your film crews to record them. And yet your own television is something quite different. "The L.A. Complex," which premieres Tuesday on the CW, is a Canadian youth-soap from Martin Gero (a veteran of"Bored to Death")
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Instant Star," which premieres tonight on The-N -- the teen-oriented nighttime incarnation of Noggin -- is what might be called a young-adult telenovella. The 13-episode series concerns 15-year-old Jude Harrison (played by 18-year-old Alexz Johnson), who wins an "American Idol"-style competition that earns her a recording contract and less of the envy of her peers than one might imagine.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1988 | KARI GRANVILLE
When voting for the outstanding dramatic series on TV ended recently at the Banff Television Festival, it wasn't any of the slick, big-name network shows such as "L.A. Law" or "thirtysomething" or the hit British soap opera "EastEnders" that emerged the winner, but a small, little-known production that usually finds itself in the children's category at such events. The prize winner, "Degrassi Junior High," is, in fact, a children's show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2011 | By Whitney Friedlander, Los Angeles Times
As it becomes more common for teenagers to realize ? and then tell others ? that they are gay or lesbian, there is also a growing number of teen characters on TV programs geared toward teens going through the same thing. The CW's "90210," which returns on Jan. 24, joins the ranks of shows like "Glee," "Gossip Girl," "Pretty Little Liars," "Hellcats," "Greek" and the new MTV series "Skins" in showcasing young, gay roles. "I felt like the world of '90210' was missing the gay characters that it would realistically have," said Rebecca Sinclair, the CW series' show runner and executive producer, on the writers' decision to show teen character Teddy Montgomery's coming-out process.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
No one knows teens like the creators of "Degrassi" -- the Canadian franchise that has built a worldwide market for shows about pimply-faced teens with heavy-duty issues but precious little parental meddling. Or so goes the conventional wisdom. But now producer and former junior high teacher Linda Schuyler has launched a sister show, "Instant Star," that takes the authentic teen soap format into the fantasy world of music stardom. And some die-hard "Degrassi" fans are having trouble adjusting.
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