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Linda Voorhees

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August 17, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screenwriter Linda Voorhees has been having the time of her life this month. First, she saw one of those giant billboards above Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood announcing "Crazy From the Heart," her first produced screenplay. "That," she said, "was thrilling." And this week People magazine checked in with the first review of the two-hour TV movie starring Christine Lahti and Ruben Blades, which received an A-minus rating.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screenwriter Linda Voorhees has been having the time of her life this month. First, she saw one of those giant billboards above Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood announcing "Crazy From the Heart," her first produced screenplay. "That," she said, "was thrilling." And this week People magazine checked in with the first review of the two-hour TV movie starring Christine Lahti and Ruben Blades, which received an A-minus rating.
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NEWS
June 17, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Voorhees, who already has one produced screenplay to her credit, has received the Jack Nicholson screenwriting prize at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television for her script titled "Mother Earth!" The Anaheim resident, who will graduate Saturday with a master's of fine arts degree in theater, film and television, is one of three UCLA screenwriting students who received prizes of $3,000. Voorhees, 40, says "Mother Earth!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If "Two Mothers for Zachary" is typical of the kind of TV movie competition that "The X-Files" will be facing when it moves to its new Sunday night time slot Oct. 27, then count on a trouncing by Mulder and Scully. Unaccountably luring the talents of Vanessa Redgrave, this pallid account, based on recent events, of a lesbian mother's fight for custody of her child in Virginia courts is almost astonishing in its boring plainness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KCET-TV's "Las Vidas de Pico/Union" and Turner Network Television's "Crazy From the Heart" were awarded Imagen ("image") Awards Friday by the National Conference of Christians and Jews for their positive portrayals of Latinos and Latino themes. "We hope rewarding these films will do more than picket lines outside of theaters," said Jerry Freedman Habush of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
If UC Irvine instructor Linda Voorhees' hunch is right, her students' names may soon be appearing in letters 10 feet tall on the nation's movie screens. UCI is already well-known for producing novelists and short-story writers. Voorhees thinks the university has the potential to be famous for its screenwriters as well. "Screenwriting is a passion for me. I live it every day," said Voorhees, who teaches an advanced screenwriting class through the UCI Extension Program.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2003 | Brian Lowry, Times Staff Writer
The Sept. 11 terrorist attacks produced immediate concern about the searing intrusion of reality on prime-time fiction, with three TV series dealing with terror threats and the Central Intelligence Agency scheduled to premiere in the fall of 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2003 | Brian Lowry
Shaun Cassidy, who produces CBS' "The Agency" (and yes, it's that Shaun Cassidy), recently observed that he's watching the news media "turn a war into a miniseries." Indeed, TV seems to transform everything into a movie or miniseries these days. "Dateline NBC" and "48 Hours Investigates" recount true-crime mysteries. The fabricated romance of "Joe Millionaire" and "The Bachelor" play out over a limited stretch like a miniseries.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2005 | Dana Calvo, Special to The Times
ROSY smudges of sunset warm the sky as a dry, gentle wind tickles more than six acres of grassy farmland that everyone around here just calls "the drive-in." Officially, it's called Crossroads Drive-in, not because it lies in the middle of a large intersection (it doesn't) but because owner Steve Rodman was at a personal crossroads when he laid down $20,000 for the 6-acre lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
This holiday season, as many before, film studios and critics are describing the big screen love stories as "classic," "epic," "old-fashioned" and as testaments to "the endurance and power of love." True enough. But this year, some traditionalists might wonder, what happened to boy-meets-girl?
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