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Linda Wertheimer

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2001 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Linda Wertheimer thought she already had the perfect job. Her new boss at National Public Radio thought he had something better. Which is why Jay Kernis, NPR's senior vice president for programming, asked the co-host of "All Things Considered" to set aside her own comfort and leave the show after 13 years, instead reporting from the field on a variety of subjects as the network's senior national correspondent. The change, announced this week, takes effect Jan. 2.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2001 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Linda Wertheimer thought she already had the perfect job. Her new boss at National Public Radio thought he had something better. Which is why Jay Kernis, NPR's senior vice president for programming, asked the co-host of "All Things Considered" to set aside her own comfort and leave the show after 13 years, instead reporting from the field on a variety of subjects as the network's senior national correspondent. The change, announced this week, takes effect Jan. 2.
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BOOKS
May 21, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH
LISTENING TO AMERICA: Twenty-Five Years in the Life of the Nation as Heard on National Public Radio edited by Linda Wertheimer (Houghton Mifflin: $24.95; 423 pp.). "My proposals on revenue sharing, government reorganization, health care, and the environment have now been before the Congress for nearly a year." Bill Clinton, 1994 perhaps? No: Richard Nixon, 1972.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | BARBARA SLAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fred Wertheimer looks like the friendly neighbor in a sitcom--the bald, bespectacled older guy dispensing advice to the nice young folks next door. But mention his name on Capitol Hill and the reaction can be anything but neighborly. "He acts as though he has a monopoly on reforming the political process," sputtered Rep. Robert Torricelli (D-N.J.), a target of Wertheimer's lobby, Common Cause. "The cause of campaign-finance reform will move more quickly with him gone."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2002
Radio journalist Linda Wertheimer, left, pays tribute today to one of the medium's pioneers in "Further Details With Robert Trout," airing at 2 p.m. on KCRW-FM (89.9). Trout began reporting in 1931 and contributed to NPR until his death in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Political correspondent Linda Wertheimer, a familiar voice to National Public Radio listeners, will become a host of NPR's "All Things Considered" program starting Monday. She'll be part of a rotating roster with Robert Siegel and Noah Adams that will allow each of the hosts time away from the microphone to pursue signature pieces and in-depth stories. Wertheimer has been covering politics for NPR since 19771.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The adventures of Democratic presidential candidates Michael Dukakis and Jesse Jackson in California will light up television screens nationwide Wednesday when the Public Broadcasting Service carries its first California debate before the state's June 7 primary live from San Francisco at 7 p.m. PDT (locally on Channels 28 and 24, delayed at 10 p.m. on Channels 50 and 15).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1997 | DAVID GREENBERG
KCLU-FM (88.3), a National Public Radio affiliate located at Cal Lutheran University, has hired radio veteran Rob Selkow as program director. Selkow, 33, served as program director for six years at WFIT in Melbourne, Fla. He replaces Mike West, who recently moved to Ohio after being with the station since its inception more than two years ago. KCLU "is a jewel of a station," Selkow said in explaining why he made the cross-country trek. "I really like being near L.A.
BOOKS
May 21, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH
LISTENING TO AMERICA: Twenty-Five Years in the Life of the Nation as Heard on National Public Radio edited by Linda Wertheimer (Houghton Mifflin: $24.95; 423 pp.). "My proposals on revenue sharing, government reorganization, health care, and the environment have now been before the Congress for nearly a year." Bill Clinton, 1994 perhaps? No: Richard Nixon, 1972.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | BARBARA SLAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fred Wertheimer looks like the friendly neighbor in a sitcom--the bald, bespectacled older guy dispensing advice to the nice young folks next door. But mention his name on Capitol Hill and the reaction can be anything but neighborly. "He acts as though he has a monopoly on reforming the political process," sputtered Rep. Robert Torricelli (D-N.J.), a target of Wertheimer's lobby, Common Cause. "The cause of campaign-finance reform will move more quickly with him gone."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the first time since 1989, National Public Radio on Monday named a new co-host for its afternoon newsmagazine, "All Things Considered." Melissa Block, NPR's New York correspondent, will leave behind her coverage of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, feature stories about baseball umpires and performance artists, and also end her maternity leave to join Robert Siegel on the program in February. "It's a thrill.
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