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Lindiwe Mabuza

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1989
Benson implies that most black South Africans would condemn the final scene in "A Dry White Season." That argument ignores both the mass support that black South Africans give the African National Congress, which pursues an armed struggle, and the tenets of liberation theology as developed in South Africa. Indeed, Lindiwe Mabuza, the representative of the African National Congress to the United States, attended the Los Angeles premiere of "A Dry White Season" and said the film was authentic, moving and important.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1990 | ALLISON SAMUELS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stressing that the release of Nelson Mandela and the lifting of the 30-year ban on the African National Congress do not go far enough, the ANC's representative to the United States called Tuesday for swift reforms by the South African government. Lindiwe Mabuza, who recently returned from meeting with Mandela at an ANC summit in Lusaka, Zambia, told about 100 students at Chapman College that South Africa would not have peace until five of the ANC's requests were granted by President F. W.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1990 | ALLISON SAMUELS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stressing that the release of Nelson Mandela and the lifting of the 30-year ban on the African National Congress do not go far enough, the ANC's representative to the United States called Tuesday for swift reforms by the South African government. Lindiwe Mabuza, who recently returned from meeting with Mandela at an ANC summit in Lusaka, Zambia, told about 100 students at Chapman College that South Africa would not have peace until five of the ANC's requests were granted by President F. W.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1989
Benson implies that most black South Africans would condemn the final scene in "A Dry White Season." That argument ignores both the mass support that black South Africans give the African National Congress, which pursues an armed struggle, and the tenets of liberation theology as developed in South Africa. Indeed, Lindiwe Mabuza, the representative of the African National Congress to the United States, attended the Los Angeles premiere of "A Dry White Season" and said the film was authentic, moving and important.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1990
Lindiwe Mabuza, the Washington representative for the African National Congress in South Africa, will speak today at Chapman College. Mabuza, who recently returned from a meeting with ANC leader Nelson Mandela, will discuss the future of South Africa and its policies as a part of the college's salute to Women's History Month. Mabuza had previously served as the representative from the ANC to Scandinavia and worked with the organization's Radio Freedom in Zambia.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration has no plans to lift U.S. sanctions against South Africa, President Bush indicated Monday, deflecting pressure from some conservatives who argue that the Pretoria government deserves a concrete reward for its racial policy reforms. "I'm bound by the law" to maintain the sanctions until the South African government meets additional conditions, Bush said in a press conference.
NEWS
July 13, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A group of prominent white South Africans joined the outlawed African National Congress in a declaration Sunday, pledging to campaign to end apartheid and establish a democratic political system in their country. South Africa's whites, as well as blacks, "have an obligation to act for the achievement of this objective," the two groups said, although "different strategies" will be used in what they declared "a common struggle" against continued minority white rule in Pretoria.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only a quarter-way through his American odyssey, Nelson Mandela is transforming his magic into big bucks for his liberation movement. In a span of barely 24 hours ending Friday night, the acknowledged leader of the African National Congress raked in more than $1.2 million for the Mandela Freedom Fund.
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If Nelson Mandela's tour of the United States goes as organizers hope, not only will the black South African leader deliver his anti-apartheid message to huge audiences nationwide, he also will raise several million dollars to pay for the trip and help fund political and social work back home. Money is very much a part of Mandela's 12-day, eight-city U.S. tour, which gets under way Wednesday when he arrives in New York and ends in California on July 1.
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