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Lindsay Conner

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1985
The single biggest step that would improve the precarious financial status of Los Angeles community colleges--indeed, community colleges throughout California--would be a change in the formula under which they receive state money. The current members of the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees have the political clout, locally and in Sacramento, to help lobby such a change through the state Legislature.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1989
Lindsay Conner was elected president of the Los Angeles Community College District's Board of Trustees after he was sworn into his third four-year term as trustee Wednesday. Also inaugurated during upbeat ceremonies at Los Angeles Trade-Technical College were first-term trustees Althea Baker and Patrick Owens.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1989
Lindsay Conner was elected president of the Los Angeles Community College District's Board of Trustees after he was sworn into his third four-year term as trustee Wednesday. Also inaugurated during upbeat ceremonies at Los Angeles Trade-Technical College were first-term trustees Althea Baker and Patrick Owens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1989
First, Quayle takes on the Russians. Now it's the Democrats. Please, George, find something for this loud-mouthed national embarrassment to do. JIMMY TERRY Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1988
As vice president of the board of trustees of the Los Angeles Community Colleges, I applaud The Times for its thoughtful editorial on the problems and opportunities of America's two-year colleges ("Neglected Campuses," April 24). The attention focused on our colleges by educators and journalists has highlighted both the importance of the service we provide, and the difficulties of maintaining and reinvigorating our programs. One of the most significant responsibilities of community colleges, which we share with four-year institutions, is to provide quality "lower-division" education--the first two years of postsecondary academic work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1985 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
After a marathon 11-hour meeting, the Los Angeles Community College District on Thursday slashed $8.2 million from its 1985-86 budget and began making preparations for what may be even deeper cuts next year. To reduce the district's budget to $216.3 million, trustees voted to lay off 53 non-teaching employees, increase student parking fees to $15 a semester and, for the first time, charge campus employees $20 a semester to park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1985 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
After six ballots, the Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees on Thursday elected Encino physician Monroe Richman as its president. The election required so many votes because the six board members repeatedly split, 3 to 3, on their selection for president. The panel's seventh seat is empty because former member Rick Tuttle resigned after being elected Los Angeles city controller last month. That position is now vacant.
NEWS
January 24, 1986 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Education Writer
The trustees of the Los Angeles Community College District have decided for the first time to lay off 140 to 300 tenured instructors, a move designed both to save money and to expand popular evening programs, it was learned Thursday. Since 1982, the nine-campus district has lost more than a third of its students, but board members, all seven of whom were elected with the backing of the faculty union, had in the past resisted suggestions that the full-time faculty be reduced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1989
First, Quayle takes on the Russians. Now it's the Democrats. Please, George, find something for this loud-mouthed national embarrassment to do. JIMMY TERRY Los Angeles
NEWS
November 5, 1987
The trustees of the Los Angeles Community College District voted Wednesday to double their salaries to $2,000 a month because of what they said are very long work hours, the need to attract new candidates and the system's improved financial condition. However, shortly afterward, the district business staff presented a report warning that "the district is not operating within a stable fiscal environment," and cutbacks might be needed next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1988
As vice president of the board of trustees of the Los Angeles Community Colleges, I applaud The Times for its thoughtful editorial on the problems and opportunities of America's two-year colleges ("Neglected Campuses," April 24). The attention focused on our colleges by educators and journalists has highlighted both the importance of the service we provide, and the difficulties of maintaining and reinvigorating our programs. One of the most significant responsibilities of community colleges, which we share with four-year institutions, is to provide quality "lower-division" education--the first two years of postsecondary academic work.
NEWS
January 24, 1986 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Education Writer
The trustees of the Los Angeles Community College District have decided for the first time to lay off 140 to 300 tenured instructors, a move designed both to save money and to expand popular evening programs, it was learned Thursday. Since 1982, the nine-campus district has lost more than a third of its students, but board members, all seven of whom were elected with the backing of the faculty union, had in the past resisted suggestions that the full-time faculty be reduced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1985 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
After a marathon 11-hour meeting, the Los Angeles Community College District on Thursday slashed $8.2 million from its 1985-86 budget and began making preparations for what may be even deeper cuts next year. To reduce the district's budget to $216.3 million, trustees voted to lay off 53 non-teaching employees, increase student parking fees to $15 a semester and, for the first time, charge campus employees $20 a semester to park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1985 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
After six ballots, the Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees on Thursday elected Encino physician Monroe Richman as its president. The election required so many votes because the six board members repeatedly split, 3 to 3, on their selection for president. The panel's seventh seat is empty because former member Rick Tuttle resigned after being elected Los Angeles city controller last month. That position is now vacant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1985
The single biggest step that would improve the precarious financial status of Los Angeles community colleges--indeed, community colleges throughout California--would be a change in the formula under which they receive state money. The current members of the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees have the political clout, locally and in Sacramento, to help lobby such a change through the state Legislature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1989
The Los Angeles Community College District on Wednesday approved pay raises of 8% for its teachers and from 8% to 12% for clerical, maintenance and other workers. The increases will be retroactive to the start of the school year. They will boost the pay of full-time faculty members to between $25,231 and $50,058, depending on experience, education and position, officials said. Board of Trustees President Lindsay Conner said he was delighted that the agreements were reached without a strike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1995 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trustees of the Los Angeles Community College District have launched their bid to find a new chancellor to head the nation's largest community college system with the hiring of an executive search firm to guide the process over the coming months. The district's Board of Trustees, which had decided not to renew Chancellor Neil Yoneji's contract when it expires next October, voted Wednesday night to pay $25,000 to the Assn.
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