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Linton Kwesi Johnson

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
There's a simple reason why Linton Kwesi Johnson's show tonight at the Music Machine will be his first Los Angeles performance in five years. Johnson, the British "dub poetry" pioneer whose politically charged poems set to fluid reggae arrangements were among reggae's most dynamic recordings between 1978 and 1984, was afraid he had run out of words. "I actually had put music aside for about four years," said Johnson during a phone interview from Vancouver.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
There's a simple reason why Linton Kwesi Johnson's show tonight at the Music Machine will be his first Los Angeles performance in five years. Johnson, the British "dub poetry" pioneer whose politically charged poems set to fluid reggae arrangements were among reggae's most dynamic recordings between 1978 and 1984, was afraid he had run out of words. "I actually had put music aside for about four years," said Johnson during a phone interview from Vancouver.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
There's a simple reason why Linton Kwesi Johnson's appearances this week will be his first Southern California performances in five years. Johnson, the British "dub poetry" pioneer whose politically charged poems set to fluid reggae arrangements were among reggae's most dynamic recordings between 1978 and 1984, was afraid he had run out of words. "I actually had put music aside for about four years," Johnson said during a phone interview from Vancouver.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
There's a simple reason why Linton Kwesi Johnson's appearances this week will be his first Southern California performances in five years. Johnson, the British "dub poetry" pioneer whose politically charged poems set to fluid reggae arrangements were among reggae's most dynamic recordings between 1978 and 1984, was afraid he had run out of words. "I actually had put music aside for about four years," Johnson said during a phone interview from Vancouver.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
"IN CONCERT WITH THE DUB BAND." Linton Kwesi Johnson. Shanachie. This two-album swan song is a superb career retrospective for the poet/activist who helped popularize the blending of poetry with reggae.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
for one, he stands closer to six feet, six inches than the nearly 7-feet stature advertised. But in his Los Angeles debut before a sparse crowd at the Music Machine on Saturday, the lanky wordsmith's pair of hourlong sets conveyed a defiant political stance that went beyond mere entertainment yet worked perfectly well on that level. Mbuli is often likened to Britain's Linton Kwesi Johnson for setting his poems to music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1986 | DON WALLER
Billed as "an evening of poetry and music," Friday's performance at the Beverly Theatre by black American poet-musician-gadfly Gil Scott-Heron and black British poet-musician-activist Linton Kwesi Johnson featured precious little of the latter--namely, the four songs on which Scott-Heron provided his own piano accompaniment. Not everyone in the near-capacity crowd was pleased.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
* Working together as Eurythmics for the first time in a decade, Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox, right, headline the Staples Center on Nov. 4. Tickets go on sale Sunday. . . . Bette Midler will also be at the Staples Center, playing there Dec. 16 following a Dec. 14 date at the Arrowhead Pond. Tickets for both shows will be available Sunday. . . . Tickets go on sale Saturday for the Hollywood Palladium's Nov. 27 bill of Kid Rock and Powerman 5000. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991 | DON SNOWDEN
Dub reggae may be pop's least-noticed sonic revolution. The style dates from the early '70s when Jamaican producers created re-mixed, stripped-down instrumental versions of songs heavily laced with echo, reverb and other studio effects. The roster of 1991 sounds affected by those experiments: dance music re-mixes, sampling, dub poetry, rap, the deejay style in dancehall reggae, and pop's developing mix 'n' match aesthetic.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2000
Butoh in the morning, butoh in the evening, butoh at supper time. . . . That's the plan for "the hours of the season," an unusual new collaboration between Japanese neo-Expressionist dancer Oguri and percussion master Adam Rudolph. The duo made The Times' best-of-the-year list in 1999, and their latest project finds them performing in three installments over a 14-hour period, presenting experimental, improvisational music and dance keyed to the dynamics of the day and the mood of the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1987 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Veteran performers Steve Winwood, Peter Gabriel and Paul Simon have picked up the most pop-rock nominations for the 29th annual recording industry's Grammy Awards. In receiving the first Grammy nominations of his more than 20-year career, Winwood led the field with five nominations when the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences announced the Grammy contenders Thursday in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994 | Richard Cromelin, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Out on the basketball court, Marcus Garvey grabs a rebound and gets the ball to point guard Nat Turner, who's teamed with Huey Newton in the back court. Turner passes to Angela Davis for a backboard-shattering dunk, much to the pleasure of the head coach, Malcolm X. These black historical figures and famed activists are running their fast breaks in the imagination of rapper and singer Michael Franti.
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