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Linus Pauling

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NEWS
February 10, 1985 | LIDIA WASOWICZ, United Press International
In a worn leather chair in an ugly converted warehouse on the poorer side of town sits one of the last of a breed--Dr. Linus Pauling, the American maverick. For 50 years, the two-time Nobel laureate with the pioneering spirit has made headlines with countless achievements and an array of controversial causes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Harvey Itano, whose studies on sickle cell disease marked the first time that a disease had been linked to a specific molecular defect and who later became the first Japanese American elected to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences, died May 8 in La Jolla. He was 89 and had Parkinson's disease. Itano was a senior at UC Berkeley when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor; in early 1942, he and his family were sent to the Tule Lake internment camp in Northern California, a reaction to the fear following the sneak attack that prompted the United States to enter World War II. He was unable to attend his graduation that summer but his grades made him class valedictorian, and then- UC President Robert Gordon Sproul personally awarded him the medal honoring his achievement.
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NEWS
March 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former associate of Linus Pauling has sued the two-time Nobel laureate, claiming that Pauling improperly took credit for discoveries about the link between vitamin C and cardiovascular health. Matthias Rath of Woodside filed the intellectual property suit against Pauling and the Linus Pauling Institute of Science in Palo Alto in Santa Clara County Superior Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001
COSTA MESA 8pm Music Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4 in F Minor signaled a sea change in the composer's symphonic output. From then on, the scope and seriousness of his symphonies deepened, without any loss of his melodic appeal. Carl St.Clair conducts the Pacific Symphony in this great work as part of the program that closes the current subscription series at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Also coming: the West Coast premiere of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991
A working celebration at the California Institute of Technology this week suggests a need for a third theory of relativity. The event is the first of eight symposiums that Caltech has planned to mark its centennial year. But the Thursday event will be a double celebration, a daylong tribute to Linus Pauling on his birthday.
NEWS
January 17, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
For the second time in five years, a scientifically conducted study by Mayo Clinic researchers has failed to confirm claims by Nobel Prize winner Linus C. Pauling that large daily doses of Vitamin C increase the length of survival of patients with advanced terminal cancer.
NEWS
June 2, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
From a windswept point along California's most spectacular shoreline, an old professor who holds the world's most prestigious award for peace plans his next moves in a deeply personal war. Many have said that for Linus Pauling, the war should have ended a long time ago when the medical profession refused to embrace his theory of Vitamin C as a panacea for all sorts of afflictions, including cancer. But the only person in history to win two unshared Nobel prizes would have none of that.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
"The last time I counted," says Linus Pauling, his blue eyes sparkling beneath a charcoal-colored beret, "I have seven birthday parties to go to." With that, the aging guru shuffles off to graciously accept the first of many birthday cakes and equally sugary tributes to his longevity, this one from his staff at the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Great men are seldom good men. Achieving great things usually requires single-mindedness of purpose, unbounded egotism, intolerance of human shortcomings and an absence of self-doubt, traits that can make such a person, shall we say, a pain in the neck.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus C. Pauling, a leader in the fight against nuclear weapons and an advocate of vitamin C to prevent cancer, the common cold and other diseases, died Friday. He was 93. Pauling died at his ranch in the Big Sur area about 7:20 p.m., according to the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine in Palo Alto. He had been in frail health for several months, according to the institute. Pauling was the only person ever to win two unshared Nobel Prizes.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there were maps to the real stars' homes in Southern California, they'd lead directly to Pasadena. That's where the great Linus Pauling lived and worked for more than 40 years, and where he became a household name and the only person in history to win two unshared Nobel Prizes (one for chemistry, the second for efforts at world peace). The charismatic chemist and humanitarian (tall, handsome and usually en beret) died in 1994 at his ranch in Big Sur.
BOOKS
March 10, 1996
Lee Dembart's Feb. 8 commentary on Linus Pauling ("Linus Pauling: A Life in Science and Politics" by Ted Goertzel and Ben Goertzel, Basic Books; "Force of Nature: The Life of Linus Pauling" by Thomas Hager, Simon & Schuster) begins: "Great men are seldom good men." To imply that Linus Pauling was not a good man, but "egotistical" and "intolerant" as well, flies in the face of what I saw when I interviewed him on two separate occasions, and what his staff, fellow scientists and many other associates told me during a documentary I produced with him. During one interview, I asked how he came to be vilified by so many other scientists.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1996 | JAMES BATES
Even in death, Linus Pauling is trying to get people to take their vitamins. A line of vitamins named after the late Nobel Prize-winning scientist and featuring his picture on each bottle has just been launched nationwide by a Culver City company under a licensing agreement from Pauling's four children. According to Pauling's daughter, Linda Pauling Kamb of Pasadena, her father legally transferred to his children the rights to his name and likeness shortly before he died two years ago at age 93.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Great men are seldom good men. Achieving great things usually requires single-mindedness of purpose, unbounded egotism, intolerance of human shortcomings and an absence of self-doubt, traits that can make such a person, shall we say, a pain in the neck. A case in point was Linus Pauling, one of this century's most extraordinary scientists, who made stellar contributions to chemistry and biology, crusaded for liberal causes when it was very dangerous to do so, won two Nobel Prizes (in chemistry and peace)
NEWS
August 26, 1994
A memorial service for Linus C. Pauling is scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday at the Stanford Memorial Church on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto. Pauling died Friday in his Big Sur home at age 93. The family has asked that any memorial donations be sent to the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Archives at Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore., or to the Linus Pauling Institute in Palo Alto.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They never met the man. Never even saw him. He was, after all, 70 years older than some of them. But young chemistry students at Caltech--where he reached his greatest heights--paused Saturday in sorrow over his passing and in gratitude for his legacy. Linus C. Pauling was dead. Chaoying Rong reacted as if he had been slapped when he heard the news during a stroll across the campus.
BOOKS
March 10, 1996
Lee Dembart's Feb. 8 commentary on Linus Pauling ("Linus Pauling: A Life in Science and Politics" by Ted Goertzel and Ben Goertzel, Basic Books; "Force of Nature: The Life of Linus Pauling" by Thomas Hager, Simon & Schuster) begins: "Great men are seldom good men." To imply that Linus Pauling was not a good man, but "egotistical" and "intolerant" as well, flies in the face of what I saw when I interviewed him on two separate occasions, and what his staff, fellow scientists and many other associates told me during a documentary I produced with him. During one interview, I asked how he came to be vilified by so many other scientists.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
He was both revered and reviled as he divided his long and productive life between the science of chemistry and the concerns of humanity. But when Linus C. Pauling died Friday of prostate cancer at age 93 at his beloved home in Big Sur, he was remembered around the world with unanimity as one of the most imposing and significant figures of the 20th Century.
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