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Linus Torvalds

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BUSINESS
December 6, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linus Torvalds was a 21-year-old computer science student at the University of Helsinki when he decided in 1991 to write a version of the Unix operating system for his IBM-compatible personal computer. It was a little project sparked by his dislike of Microsoft's DOS software and his desire to create an operating system--the software that controls basic computer functions--that was stable and reliable.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
The creator of the Linux operating system is joining a global development group to focus on improving the open-source software. Linus Torvalds said he is taking a leave from his research job at chip maker Transmeta Corp. He will become the first fellow at the Beaverton, Ore.-based Open Source Development Lab, which is funded by high-tech companies to, among other things, enhance Linux for corporate data centers. At the lab, he will focus on the next major revision of the Linux core, or kernel.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 1999 | Joseph Menn
Linus Torvalds said his secretive new company, Transmeta, has been working on what he called the first chip with built-in software. In a speech before 5,500 attendees at the Comdex computer convention, Torvalds, the lead designer of the Linux operating system and the open-source movement, said the Silicon Valley company will make public details of its product on Jan. 19.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linus Torvalds was a 21-year-old computer science student at the University of Helsinki when he decided in 1991 to write a version of the Unix operating system for his IBM-compatible personal computer. It was a little project sparked by his dislike of Microsoft's DOS software and his desire to create an operating system--the software that controls basic computer functions--that was stable and reliable.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
The creator of the Linux operating system is joining a global development group to focus on improving the open-source software. Linus Torvalds said he is taking a leave from his research job at chip maker Transmeta Corp. He will become the first fellow at the Beaverton, Ore.-based Open Source Development Lab, which is funded by high-tech companies to, among other things, enhance Linux for corporate data centers. At the lab, he will focus on the next major revision of the Linux core, or kernel.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Linus Torvalds bought his first personal computer in 1991 at age 21, he didn't like the Microsoft DOS software that came with the machine. He wanted something more powerful, like the Unix systems he was using as a second-year computer science student at the University of Helsinki. So Torvalds decided to write his own operating system. "I just wanted something good enough for me," he said.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Linux-related stocks jumped Wednesday after Linus Torvalds, creator of the much-hyped computer operating software that competes with Microsoft Corp.'s Windows, said a new version will be released at midyear. The new software, known as version 2.4, must be completed and checked for problems, Torvalds said at the LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in New York. An unofficial version will be released for testing in a couple of months, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2002
The U.S. government, state judicial systems and Sun Microsystems are apparently not the only foes troubling Bill Gates and Microsoft Corp. For nearly 20 years, a loosely affiliated group of computer hackers and programmers, virtual Davids, if you will, have pooled their talents and aimed their cyber-slingshots at techno-Goliath Microsoft and its dominance of personal computer operating systems.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2000
Your Weekend Viewing/Listening Some highlights of business programming. (All times are Pacific time.)Today * Noon: "Business Hour" (KFWB-AM [980]) * 1 p.m.: "Business Hour with Bob McCormick." (KNX-AM [1070]) * 2 p.m.: "Tech Hour" (KNX-AM [1070]) * 3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 8:30 p.m.: "Moneyline." (CNN) * 4 p.m.: "Market Week with Maria Bartiromo." John Chambers, CEO of Cisco Systems. (CNBC; also airs at 4 p.m. and 11 p.m. Saturday and Sunday) * 5:30 p.m.: "Nightly Business Report."
BUSINESS
June 29, 2000 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transmeta Corp., a privately owned chip maker based in Santa Clara, Calif., made a big splash at a computer trade show this week by showing off a range of laptop machines powered by its low-power microprocessors that will compete with mighty Intel. Transmeta's low-power chips, called Crusoe, were featured in demonstration laptops by IBM, NEC, Hitachi and Fujitsu as well as other devices at PC Expo, an annual trade fair, where it won Best of Show honors.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1999 | Joseph Menn
Linus Torvalds said his secretive new company, Transmeta, has been working on what he called the first chip with built-in software. In a speech before 5,500 attendees at the Comdex computer convention, Torvalds, the lead designer of the Linux operating system and the open-source movement, said the Silicon Valley company will make public details of its product on Jan. 19.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Linus Torvalds bought his first personal computer in 1991 at age 21, he didn't like the Microsoft DOS software that came with the machine. He wanted something more powerful, like the Unix systems he was using as a second-year computer science student at the University of Helsinki. So Torvalds decided to write his own operating system. "I just wanted something good enough for me," he said.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2006 | From Associated Press
Google Inc. and EBay Inc.'s Skype Technologies Inc. are investing in a Spanish start-up that plans to help hotspot owners charge for Wi-Fi access, a plan that could face significant opposition from Internet service providers. The Internet heavyweights were joined by venture capital firms Index Ventures and Sequoia Capital in making a $22-million investment in Madrid-based FON. In its announcement Sunday, FON did not say how much each investor was contributing.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
VA Linux Systems, a maker of high-end computers that run the hot Linux computer operating system, saw its shares soar a record-breaking 698% on its first day of trading. The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company, nearly 5 years old, stunned market watchers Thursday as its stock jumped from its initial offering price of $30 to open at $299, and then to close at $239.25 on Nasdaq. The company raised $132 million through the sale of 4.4 million shares.
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