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BUSINESS
March 1, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. agreed Friday to let Chinese officials review the source code for its Windows operating systems, demonstrating the lengths it will go to in battling rival Linux software for government business on multiple continents. Microsoft founder Bill Gates announced the deal in Beijing during a trip in which he sealed a number of contracts with major Chinese companies.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2003 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
A long time ago, in an economy far, far away, computer manufacturer Silicon Graphics Inc. was a powerful force. Hollywood studios courted its executives. They spent hundreds of millions of dollars on the company's colorful and whimsically named machines -- "Indigo," Crimson" and "Onyx," among others. The technology gave birth to a new breed of big-screen special effects, from the shape-shifting Terminator to the exploding White House in "Independence Day."
BUSINESS
December 26, 2002 | Helen Jung, Associated Press
Microsoft Corp. executives have called the open-source software Linux a cancer. They've even described the increasingly popular operating system -- an alternative to Microsoft's proprietary Windows -- as un-American. But now they're hoping to attach a different word: costly. As businesses increasingly adopt Linux to run their computer servers, Microsoft is shifting the battleground from schoolyard insults or techie-speak to corporate notions of "business value."
BUSINESS
September 18, 2002 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month after Sun Microsystems Inc. reversed course and said it would do more to promote the free Linux operating system, the big computer maker plans to announce today that it intends to sell a line of desktop machines running Linux and other open-source programs. The move could give a boost to Linux in the area it's weakest: the personal computer.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2002 | Associated Press
Red Hat Inc. has formed a partnership with computer giant IBM Corp. under which the Linux company will strike up a cozier relationship with Big Blue's hardware, services and software divisions, the companies said. Under the alliance, Red Hat's new and more expensive software, called Red Hat Advanced Server, will be sold by IBM's consulting division and run across four lines of IBM servers and mainframes. In trading on Nasdaq, shares of Red Hat were at $5.84, up 59 cents, or 11%.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2002 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battered by the collapse of its free-spending dot-com and telecommunications customers, Sun Microsystems Inc. said Tuesday it would do more to link itself to the free operating system Linux. A year and a half after buying a manufacturer of inexpensive servers running Linux, Sun said it would start selling a line of low-end servers that would give users a choice of Linux and Sun's Solaris operating system and that use Intel Corp. microprocessors instead of Sun's more sophisticated chips.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Sun Microsystems Inc., whose server computers power networks and Web sites, introduced a machine that will run on the free Linux operating system, a bid to stem a drop in sales as users seek less expensive products. Customers can choose the LX50 server running on Sun's Solaris software or the company's version of Linux. Prices for the computer start at $2,795, compared with more than $1 million for some of Sun's most powerful machines running on Unix software. Analysts say Santa Clara, Calif.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Oracle Corp., Dell Computer Corp. and Red Hat Inc. are teaming up to sell software and computers running on Linux, tapping growing demand for the low-cost operating system. Oracle's database software, used for storing libraries of information, will run on the Red Hat version of the Linux operating system, and Dell will sell computer servers and storage systems loaded with the Oracle database and Linux. Oracle shares rose 84 cents to $8.66. Dell fell 7 cents to $26.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2002 | Associated Press
Four Linux companies announced plans to create a common business version of the open source operating system. Industry leader Red Hat Inc., however, was not among them. Caldera International Inc., Turbolinux Inc., SuSE Linux and Conectiva Corp. jointly will develop the distribution called UnitedLinux and sell it, by the end of the year, under their own brand names. Previously, each company released its own flavor of the operating system.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2002 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alternative PC operating system Linux has struggled in the marketplace not because of bullying from Microsoft Corp. but because of haphazard development by Linux backers, lawyers for Microsoft said Monday. Under questioning from Microsoft trial attorney Stephanie Wheeler, Michael Tiemann, chief technology officer of Linux distributor Red Hat Inc., acknowledged in U.S. District Court that his company had spent less money than rivals on research and development.
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