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Lion King

ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Director-designer Julie Taymor's visionary work has been turning heads in the theater world for nearly two decades. Yet for all her renown among aficionados of the avant-garde, it's only in the last few years that she's come to the attention of mainstream audiences. This newfound recognition comes thanks to Taymor's Tony-winning turn as director and co-designer of Disney's "The Lion King" and, more recently, her 1999 feature film debut, "Titus," starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With virtually all of them dressed in black leather jackets, jeans and heavy boots, they might have been waiting to buy the latest hot album release or tickets to a concert. Except their smiles were a whole lot brighter and more practiced than most. And they were nervous. By 9 a.m. Saturday, more than 100 young and aspiring actors stood in line outside Hollywood's Henry Fonda Theatre for an open-call audition to begin a half-hour later.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2000 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The assignment: Interview the four 11-year-old actors who landed the plum roles of Young Simba and Young Nala in Disney's blockbuster musical "The Lion King," at the Pantages Theatre in Hollywood. The dread: That the interview would be a quadruple dose of over-handled, over-groomed, self-important, stagy little adults in kid clothes. The reality: Adrian Diamond, Lisa Tucker, KaRonn A. Henderson and Jazmn are four unjaded, friendly kid-next-door types, albeit unusually talented.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1994 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lions and tigers and. . . . Make that lions and wolves and a bear of an opening--or, barely an opening--for Macaulay Culkin. Brows were unfurrowed, fists unclenched at Sony Pictures as Columbia's big summer movie gamble, the $70-million "Wolf," got off to a strong start, raking in an estimated $18.2 million on 2,117 screens, the second-best opening of the year behind "The Flintstones" and the studio's third biggest debut ever behind "Bram Stoker's Dracula" and "Ghostbusters II."
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | LEE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lion King, the much-praised and highly successful animated Disney feature film, makes its network television debut (ABC, Sunday at 7 p.m.). The story follows the adventures of Simba, a heroic young lion trying to find his place in nature's "circle of life." For the family. * Estelle Getty plays Lloyd's (Michael McShane) mother, an eccentric senior citizen who loves to mambo, on Brotherly Love (WB, Sunday at 7:30 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | CARROLL LACHNIT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Lion King's" animation dazzles. It has the golden G rating. But most important for parents seeking wholesome entertainment, "The Lion King" carries the ultimate blessing: the Disney name. So why would parents hesitate?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creators of "The Lion King," Disney's summer box-office smash, say they were surprised to learn of reported similarities in the animated film and a Japanese-created American television cartoon series of the 1960s called "Kimba, the White Lion." "Frankly, I'm not familiar with (the TV series)," said Rob Minkoff, who added that he and co-director Roger Allers first learned about the controversy on a recent trip to Japan to promote the Disney film, whose lion cub is named Simba.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a conscientious casting director to remember South-Central. And a few Baptist ministers to pass the word. And a godmother who didn't mind waiting under the hot Saturday morning sun. Now it was up to 12-year-old Eric Gordon to show Disney that he "just can't wait to be king." Disney's "The Lion King" needed a couple of cubs for its ongoing Hollywood production, so casting people had come looking in the Crenshaw District.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1995 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Litterman feline T-shirts, "Baywatch" Barbie dolls and visions of best-selling merchandise based on the next blockbuster movie danced in the heads of manufacturers this week at Licensing '95, an exposition for the $100-billion-plus worldwide merchandise-licensing industry. Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1994 | From Reuters
In Walt Disney's latest film hit, "The Lion King," the lion cub Simba grows up to thwart his treacherous uncle Scar and assume the mantle of leadership left him by his courageous father Mufasa. From an immature squeak, his roar grows to one worthy of a Lion King. While King Simba rules the movie's Pride Lands, in the land of animated films and the sophisticated marketing that accompanies their release, Disney is the Lion King, emitting a merchandising and licensing roar heard around the world.
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