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OPINION
February 15, 1987
Once again The Times has issued a typically knee-jerk reaction to the state Department of Fish and Game's proposal to allow a conservative, limited mountain lion hunt in its editorial (Feb. 5), "Going After the Big Cats." When your mind is made up, it's easy to ignore the fact that state policy requires diversified uses of wildlife, including sport hunting where appropriate (Article 2, Section 1801). The same state policy also requires maintenance of a viable lion population and protection of lion habitat, both objectives to which the department is committed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a young female mountain lion was killed on the Eastern toll road near Anaheim Hills two weeks ago, it was a hard blow to a dwindling population: She was not only one of the few remaining descendants of the Santa Ana Mountains' original trailblazers, she was just entering prime reproductive age. Biologists say fewer than 20 mountain lions prowl the chaparral-covered mountains between Orange and Riverside counties. It may be fewer than a dozen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1987
I noted with interest the many denunciations of the California Fish & Game Commission for its approval of an extremely restrictive cougar season. Mountain lions survived more than 50 years of intensive professional bounty hunting with no obvious decline in their numbers. Certainly the few permits being sold will have no effect upon the lion population, especially when one considers that the hunter success ratio will probably be under 1%. Let the management of our wildlife rest with the professionals.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | From Associated Press
Killer whales that normally hunt seals and sea lions are now feeding on sea otters and creating an ecological crisis along the entire Aleutian Island chain of western Alaska, researchers say. The sudden loss of thousands of sea otters is allowing a boom in the population of sea urchins and those animals, in turn, are stripping the undersea kelp forest, laying bare vast areas that once were lush with the marine plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1995 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Animal rights groups on Thursday attacked a statewide measure on the March ballot that would end a ban against hunting mountain lions, calling the initiative a ruse by gun enthusiasts and others hoping to bring the trophy sport back to California. The animal rights advocates accused the authors of Proposition 197 of seeking support by whipping up public hysteria with stories of vicious--but isolated--attacks in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1990
Your support of Proposition 117 (editorial, "No Longer the Hunted Mountain Lion," May 16) despite scientific evidence, opposition by major wildlife conservation groups, and the flaws which you admit are in the proposed law, is most regrettable. When funds for health and social programs are cut, when funds for actual endangered species are transferred from already tight budgets, when the public is not able to use the lands which have been purchased with their tax dollars, and when attacks on children, pets and livestock escalate because of a lion population that cannot be controlled until after a tragedy occurs, it will be too late for hand-wringing and whining that this is not what was meant to happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1985
This letter is in reference to your article (April 27) about the decision to kill mountain lions in Placer County. This year five mountain lions will be killed in the Forest Divide area of Placer County to protect sheep ranchers from increased losses they have encountered in the last couple of years. Before more lions are killed I think that the California Fish and Game Commission should study the problem in more depth. Then a better plan can be set up for the management of the mountain lion population in this area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1996
I would like to address the Proposition 197 mountain lion initiative amendment. My wife and I are cattle ranchers and longtime Ventura County residents. We graze cows on about 6,000 acres of pasture found directly above Ventura. One benefit of ranching is a relationship with nature and wildlife while working and living in our environment. We observe many changes in wildlife cycles, which include deer, coyotes, rabbits, quail, bobcats, mountain lions and many more animals. One change that has us concerned is the explosion of the mountain lion population since Proposition 117 (specially protecting lions)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1987 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB
Refusing to make what one member said would have been a "hasty decision," the California Fish and Game Commission on Friday delayed until April any move toward establishing a hunting season on mountain lions. The commission listened to dozens of speakers for nearly three hours before putting off action on the highly controversial and emotional issue. It had been expected to make a tentative decision Friday on whether to end a 15-year ban on sport hunting of the big cats.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after a distemper epidemic roared through Serengeti National Park, killing at least a third of its famed lions, researchers say the beasts seem to be making a remarkable comeback. In recent weeks, it has been relatively easy to spot lions throughout the park. Camera-toting tourists have been particularly captivated by six cubs scampering about in the tall grass by the Seronera River. Researchers have named them Mickey, Babe, Alannis, Gwyneth, Horny and Lizzie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1998 | DAVID FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When concerns about marauding cougars rise, wildlife experts offer reassurances: The typical cougar is a shy creature that avoids people and prefers to eat deer rather than pets or children. So much for typical. Now consider the cougar that ate Wes Collins' dog: It emerged from the forest behind the Collins house one evening in May and zeroed in on Sandy, the family's 50-pound Labrador mix.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1997 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mountain lion was reportedly sighted Tuesday in a neighborhood near College of the Canyons, not far from where authorities killed a cougar last month, but a land and air search turned up no sign of the big cat. The lion was reported at about 10:30 a.m. by a woman walking her dog near Arroyo Park Drive and Summit Place, east of the Golden State Freeway between the California Institute of the Arts and the college, said Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1996
I would like to address the Proposition 197 mountain lion initiative amendment. My wife and I are cattle ranchers and longtime Ventura County residents. We graze cows on about 6,000 acres of pasture found directly above Ventura. One benefit of ranching is a relationship with nature and wildlife while working and living in our environment. We observe many changes in wildlife cycles, which include deer, coyotes, rabbits, quail, bobcats, mountain lions and many more animals. One change that has us concerned is the explosion of the mountain lion population since Proposition 117 (specially protecting lions)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1995 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Animal rights groups on Thursday attacked a statewide measure on the March ballot that would end a ban against hunting mountain lions, calling the initiative a ruse by gun enthusiasts and others hoping to bring the trophy sport back to California. The animal rights advocates accused the authors of Proposition 197 of seeking support by whipping up public hysteria with stories of vicious--but isolated--attacks in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1995
I suppose Katherine Dowling is entitled to her opinions ("Defying the Laws of Nature," Commentary, Jan. 18), but she really should get her facts straight. Revenues raised for mountain lions through hunting fees and licenses have always been minuscule compared to funding from other sources. For example, in 1987 and again in 1988, the California Department of Fish and Game proposed a hunting season on mountain lions. For $1, a hunter could buy a chance at having his or her name drawn from 190 permits.
SPORTS
May 4, 1994 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been more than a week since Barbara Schoener was ambushed and killed by a mountain lion while jogging on a trail in the Northern California wilderness. But the focus, because of the nature of the incident April 23 in the hills northeast of Sacramento, remains on cougars. A fairly large lion attacked Schoener from behind while she jogged down the remote trail, killing her with bites to the neck and head. The lion then dragged her body 300 feet before covering it with leaves and debris.
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