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Lionel Hampton

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NEWS
January 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A five-alarm fire sparked by a falling lamp swept through vibraphonist Lionel Hampton's apartment, injuring 19 people and sending smoke billowing through the Manhattan skyscraper. Two attendants who work for the 83-year-old Hampton, who is confined to a wheelchair since suffering two strokes in 1995, got him safely out of the apartment. The fire apparently started when a halogen lamp tipped over, igniting a piece of furniture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013
A powerhouse on baritone saxophone, the New York-based Gary Smulyan was a fixture in a number of bands fronted by jazz royalty, including Joe Henderson, Freddie Hubbard and Lionel Hampton. Here he performs in support of his 2012 album "Smul's Paradise" backed by Darek Oles and Joe La Barbera. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St., Suite 301. Fri. 9 p.m. $15. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1997
Plans for a youth jazz festival in honor of legendary vibraphonist Lionel Hampton were announced this week. The First Annual Lionel Hampton Los Angeles Unified School District Jazz Festival is scheduled for April 19 at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State Los Angeles. Hampton, as well as Big Band performer Illinois Jacquet, are among the musicians who will perform. Lloyd Rucker, a photographer of jazz musicians, organized the festival to promote jazz education.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
People often ask jazz vibraphonist Roy Ayers how, even after five decades of recording, he is still finding ways to introduce his sound to the masses. In his case, necessity has always been the mother of reinvention. "If I didn't have music I wouldn't even want to be here," Ayers, 71, said. "It's like an escape when there is no escape. An escape for temporary moments. " Over the years his escape came in many forms: hard-bop, psychedelic R&B, disco, afro beat, hip-hop and house music.
OPINION
September 4, 2002
Re "Virtuoso on the Vibraphone, One of the Last Giants of Jazz," Sept. 1: It was during a trip from Hoboken, N.J., aboard the Rijndam in December 1956 that I met Lionel Hampton. I was in the Palm Court of the ocean liner when, after the dance, Mr. Hampton took a seat at the bar next to me while his band was engaged in a jam session. I was a young man then, finishing my studies in Europe, but he took time to engage me in many conversations during the six-day journey. On the eve of the arrival in Rotterdam, he wrote me an inspiring note, which I still hold dear, and signed it, "To Ben, from your friend Lionel Hampton."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Big-band swing music may be making a comeback these days, but for one legendary bandleader it's never gone away. It's been nearly 60 years since vibist Lionel Hampton, who turned 90 in April, started recording with the large bands he has led almost continuously ever since.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
The Jazz at the Lyceum series opens Wednesday with a concert by vibraphonist Lionel Hampton at the Lyceum Theatre in Horton Plaza. Why at a theater and why downtown? "Bringing jazz to the Lyceum Theatre is part of the San Diego Repertory Theatre's continuing commitment to making this space available to local arts organizations," said Lyceum booking manager David Lipton.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
"The world's most exciting young jazz pianist!" reads the headline on John Colianni's press brochure. Another pianist is quoted as finding him "Fantastic!" and he is credited by Downbeat magazine with "the grace of Art Tatum and the speed of Oscar Peterson." It's too bad, because his sort of excessive hype can be counterproductive, leading to a skeptical attitude on the part of critics.
NEWS
June 16, 1985
USC's Ebonics Support Group will honor Mike Garrett and Lionel Hampton as outstanding alumni at its eighth annual Gala Dinner June 25 at the Bonaventure. Other alumni to receive awards include Robert Kennard, Pamela McGee, Paula McGee and Vivian Nash. The Ebonics Support Group was founded in 1976 to assist black and other minority students at USC with scholarships and financial aid. It has expanded its activities to include specific social human and professional needs of minority students.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Survival has been very much on our minds this past week. The loss of one hardy perennial, Woody Herman, reminded us that the ranks are thinning; on the other hand, Lionel Hampton's concert Tuesday at the Ambassador in Pasadena focused welcome attention on the toughest survivor of them all. Hampton has been leading a band, usually a big one like his present 17-man unit, for 47 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2011 | Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Gil Bernal, a tenor saxophonist who during his long career played a variety of styles with artists such as Spike Jones, Lionel Hampton and Ry Cooder , has died. He was 80. Bernal died of congestive heart failure July 17 at Glendale Adventist Medical Center, his family said. Adept at playing pop, jazz or blues, Bernal sang and played with Hampton's big band and had memorable sax parts on such 1950s songs as Duane Eddy's "Rebel Rouser" and the Robins' "Smokey Joe's Cafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Benny Powell, a veteran jazz trombonist who played with Count Basie from the early 1950s to the early 1960s, taking a solo turn in the band's 1955 recording of "April in Paris," has died. He was 80. Powell died June 26 at Roosevelt Hospital in New York City after undergoing back surgery, said publicist Devra Hall Levy. The cause has not been determined. A native of New Orleans, Powell had a varied career that ranged from Lionel Hampton's big band in the late 1940s to modern jazz with pianist Randy Weston and his African Rhythms ensemble for the last quarter-century.
NEWS
September 9, 2002 | HOWARD REICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the sun rose over Manhattan on Saturday morning, several musicians wearing crisp white shirts and impeccably pressed black suits and ties warmed up on their horns, their random notes piercing the early morning quiet and quickly drawing a crowd outside the Cotton Club in Harlem. After a few minutes, trumpeter Wynton Marsalis--sporting the ebony hat that marked him as the leader of the band--called a tune, put his horn to his lips and let out a glorious cry, while a horse-drawn carriage just ahead started rolling.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2002 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Orleans invaded Harlem and Dixieland jazz filled the streets Saturday as more than 2,000 people--including recording artists, former President Bush and passionate fans--celebrated the life of musical legend Lionel Hampton. Led by trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis, the memorial services began with a traditional New Orleans "jazz funeral" procession outside Harlem's historic Cotton Club. A nine-member band, wailing "St.
OPINION
September 4, 2002
Re "Virtuoso on the Vibraphone, One of the Last Giants of Jazz," Sept. 1: It was during a trip from Hoboken, N.J., aboard the Rijndam in December 1956 that I met Lionel Hampton. I was in the Palm Court of the ocean liner when, after the dance, Mr. Hampton took a seat at the bar next to me while his band was engaged in a jam session. I was a young man then, finishing my studies in Europe, but he took time to engage me in many conversations during the six-day journey. On the eve of the arrival in Rotterdam, he wrote me an inspiring note, which I still hold dear, and signed it, "To Ben, from your friend Lionel Hampton."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the final period of Lionel Hampton's long life, after a series of strokes that left his performance ability and speech impaired, he maintained a fierce desire to stay in the swim of the musical life. He kept active in the last five years of his life by touring and playing the role of a wise elder in jazz, and an important part of that annual regimen took him to Moscow, Idaho, every February to preside at the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lionel Hampton, Ginger Rogers, Mstislav Rostropovich, Paul Taylor, Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward will receive this year's Kennedy Center Honors, it was announced Thursday. Selected by the trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts for their contributions to cultural life in America, they will be guests of President Bush at the White House and will attend a televised performance at the Kennedy Center in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2011 | Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Gil Bernal, a tenor saxophonist who during his long career played a variety of styles with artists such as Spike Jones, Lionel Hampton and Ry Cooder , has died. He was 80. Bernal died of congestive heart failure July 17 at Glendale Adventist Medical Center, his family said. Adept at playing pop, jazz or blues, Bernal sang and played with Hampton's big band and had memorable sax parts on such 1950s songs as Duane Eddy's "Rebel Rouser" and the Robins' "Smokey Joe's Cafe.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Lionel Hampton gave his last performance in Los Angeles--a 90th birthday celebration in 1998 at the Ford Amphitheatre--his indomitable spirit was still willing, even though his familiar, high-spirited physical vigor had been dimmed by a series of strokes. But no matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2002 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lionel Hampton, the irrepressible bandleader who played with an infectious joy that captivated fans around the world and, in the process, gave the vibraphone a lasting place on the jazz bandstand, died Saturday morning at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City. He was 94. In failing health for several years after a series of strokes, Hampton was admitted to the hospital Wednesday. The cause of death was heart failure, said his manager, Phil Leshin.
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