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Lionel Punchard

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BUSINESS
March 30, 1992 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
The mortgage business is a hectic one these days, as rates change almost daily and brokers search frantically for the best and cheapest loans for their clients. It can also be an exciting business--one that rewards both with money and the satisfaction of helping families get into the home of their dreams, says Lionel Punchard. The 39-year-old owner and president of First Republic Mortgage Corp.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 1992 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
The mortgage business is a hectic one these days, as rates change almost daily and brokers search frantically for the best and cheapest loans for their clients. It can also be an exciting business--one that rewards both with money and the satisfaction of helping families get into the home of their dreams, says Lionel Punchard. The 39-year-old owner and president of First Republic Mortgage Corp.
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BUSINESS
November 23, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that it is losing money on low-interest-rate home-loan refinancing, Plaza Home Mortgage Corp. revised its third-quarter results on Monday to include a write-down of $15.9 million. The change means that the fast-expanding home loan company took a loss of $4.9 million, or 44 cents a share, for the quarter. Plaza is one of a handful of publicly traded mortgage lenders nationwide that have announced such write-downs during the past few months.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1992 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New home sales in Orange County during the three months ended March 15 fell 17% from the first three months of 1991, but the decline doesn't mean that the nearly three-year-old housing industry slump is worsening, industry analysts say. A total of 1,639 new homes were sold in Orange County from mid-December through mid-March, and while that is down from the same period in 1991, the sales represent a 51% increase from the traditionally slow fourth quarter.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fed up with urban life, the Greenwalds scouted Orange County's waterfront for years looking for their dream property. They finally decided on an apartment building in exclusive Huntington Harbour. Then came Orange County's bankruptcy filing a week ago--and the Greenwalds got nervous, very nervous. With upward of $400,000 at stake, the couple halted escrow on their purchase.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | NANCY JO HILL
Kenneth Vernon hopes his participation in the 1990 Orange County Black Role Model Calendar will help black youngsters better understand their own potential. He also hopes it will help change some preconceived notions about blacks. "You see so many negative stereotypes about blacks that I hope this shows that not all blacks are on welfare. Not all blacks are uneducated. Not all blacks don't have a strong male image in the home," says the 30-year-old geologist, who has a 4-year-old son.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1993 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the nation's largest cities--Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, Atlanta--have a well-established black business community where residents shop and dine. Like other ethnic groups, blacks historically have gravitated to their own neighborhoods, where they take their laundry to the black-owned dry cleaner down the street and buy milk at the corner market. But the racial mosaic of Orange County is much different from other metropolitan areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN and BRIAN RAY BALLOU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than a decade after Congress declared a federal holiday in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., most people in Orange County still don't get the day off. Schools and courts are closed, as mandated by state law. Local branches of most banks are also shuttered, largely because their state and national offices will not be operating. But trash will be picked up. Buses will run on regular schedules.
REAL ESTATE
November 15, 1992 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When David Brown got a notice from his lender last fall stating that the impound accounts he had set up to pay for taxes and insurance on his Laguna Niguel home were $887 short, he knew that "something wasn't right." According to Brown's calculations, the $400 he paid into his impound accounts each month would easily cover the two installments on his annual $2,806 property-tax bill and $1,100 insurance premiums when they eventually came due.
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