Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLionel Shriver
IN THE NEWS

Lionel Shriver

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Tribune Newspapers
It takes guts to write a satire about terrorism - and Lionel Shriver has guts. She has already published biting novels about the failings of the U.S. healthcare system ("So Much for That") and a school shooter ("We Need to Talk About Kevin"). Terrorism? Why not? In "The New Republic," the problem is in Barba, a Portuguese peninsula with a legitimate yet tiny political movement seeking independence, and an unaffiliated - so they say - terrorist arm that has taken up international violence.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Tribune Newspapers
It takes guts to write a satire about terrorism - and Lionel Shriver has guts. She has already published biting novels about the failings of the U.S. healthcare system ("So Much for That") and a school shooter ("We Need to Talk About Kevin"). Terrorism? Why not? In "The New Republic," the problem is in Barba, a Portuguese peninsula with a legitimate yet tiny political movement seeking independence, and an unaffiliated - so they say - terrorist arm that has taken up international violence.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Ella Taylor
So Much for That A Novel Lionel Shriver Harper: 438 pp., $25.99 Toward the end of her gleefully mutinous new novel, "So Much for That," Lionel Shriver reveals the provenance of her beleaguered protagonist's name, Shep Knacker. In bygone England, a knacker was someone who bought burned-out farm animals for conversion into fertilizer. We'll get to the relevance of that, but anyone with a casual acquaintance with Yiddish may also hear in Shep's evocative moniker echoes of the term schlep naches , which loosely translates as deriving pleasure from the achievements of others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Ella Taylor
So Much for That A Novel Lionel Shriver Harper: 438 pp., $25.99 Toward the end of her gleefully mutinous new novel, "So Much for That," Lionel Shriver reveals the provenance of her beleaguered protagonist's name, Shep Knacker. In bygone England, a knacker was someone who bought burned-out farm animals for conversion into fertilizer. We'll get to the relevance of that, but anyone with a casual acquaintance with Yiddish may also hear in Shep's evocative moniker echoes of the term schlep naches , which loosely translates as deriving pleasure from the achievements of others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2007 | Heller McAlpin, Special to The Times
and who hasn't? -- how their life might have turned out had they pursued a different path will understand the allure of Lionel Shriver's ninth novel. Like the 1998 movie "Sliding Doors," starring Gwyneth Paltrow, "The Post-Birthday World" spins two different scenarios for Shriver's protagonist, depending not on whether she catches a train but on a decision she makes at a crucial romantic turning point in her life.
BOOKS
May 17, 1987 | Maureen Connell
THE FEMALE OF THE SPECIES by Lionel Shriver (Farrar, Straus & Giroux: $17.95; 361 pp.). Lionel Shriver's first novel is splendid. Beautiful Gray Kaiser, a 59-year-old American anthropologist, returns to the site of her first great triumph in Kenya to film a documentary. She is accompanied by Erroll McEchern, her younger assistant, who has worshiped her from afar for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Andrea Levy's "Small Island," which won the 2004 Orange Prize for fiction by women, was named Best of the Best of the award's first 10 years. The novel, which addresses racial issues in post-World War II Britain, prevailed over such works as "Larry's Party" by Carol Shields, which won in 1998, "Bel Canto" by Ann Patchett, the 2002 winner, and "We Need to Talk About Kevin" by Lionel Shriver, this year's winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
American author A.M Homes has won the Women's Prize for Fiction with her novel "May We Be Forgiven. " Homes was presented the award, which comes with a cash prize of close to $46,000, on Wednesday night in London. Homes, who lives in New York City, is the author of two short story collections, six other novels and a memoir. "May We Be Forgiven" is a darkly funny novel of family, betrayal and forgiveness. "May We Be Forgiven" was published in the U.K. by Granta Books. It's a spot of good news for Granta; recently its publishing house and magazine have been undergoing a very public leadership change.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
This post has been corrected, as indicated below. Baileys liquor has been announced as the new sponsor of the British-based women's fiction prize, formerly the Orange Prize. This year's winner will receive an award of close to $46,000 in a ceremony taking place Wednesday night in London. Booze is not replacing fruit as a sponsor; Orange is a telecom company in the U.K. The prize was founded in 1996 as the Orange Prize. After the company announced its withdrawal as a sponsor, this year's prize has been funded by an anonymous group of donors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Fifty years ago Monday, Sylvia Plath, a 30-year-old American living in England, put her head in her oven and committed suicide. Her two children were upstairs; her husband, the poet Ted Hughes, had left her after a tempestuous relationship. Her poetry and the semi-autobiographical novel "The Bell Jar" have become lasting parts of our literary culture.  Today, Plath is much remembered -- and specifically, she's being remembered online. Poet Craig Morgan Teicher looks at the poems in Plath's debut collection, "The Colossus," at NPR: "The strange psyche at the core of these poems is made powerful by its seemingly limitless ability to endure self-destruction ... . As tragic and dark as her end would be, it's nonetheless thrilling to watch this great artist becoming herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2007 | Heller McAlpin, Special to The Times
and who hasn't? -- how their life might have turned out had they pursued a different path will understand the allure of Lionel Shriver's ninth novel. Like the 1998 movie "Sliding Doors," starring Gwyneth Paltrow, "The Post-Birthday World" spins two different scenarios for Shriver's protagonist, depending not on whether she catches a train but on a decision she makes at a crucial romantic turning point in her life.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|