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Lionfish

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SCIENCE
January 25, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
They are gaudy. They are hungry. And they are invading coral reefs and devouring native fish throughout the Caribbean. They are lionfish, and they are multiplying like crazy. Until recently, the battle to save the Carribean's coral reefs from a lionfish explosion seemed hopeless. Lionfish grow quickly and spawn as much as once every three to four days. They are "gape-limited," which means they feast on whatever fits in their mouth, and there is a painful venom in their spikes. At least in the Atlantic, they appear to have no natural predators.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
January 25, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
They are gaudy. They are hungry. And they are invading coral reefs and devouring native fish throughout the Caribbean. They are lionfish, and they are multiplying like crazy. Until recently, the battle to save the Carribean's coral reefs from a lionfish explosion seemed hopeless. Lionfish grow quickly and spawn as much as once every three to four days. They are "gape-limited," which means they feast on whatever fits in their mouth, and there is a painful venom in their spikes. At least in the Atlantic, they appear to have no natural predators.
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NATIONAL
July 10, 2011 | By William E. Gibson, Washington Bureau
Beware the lionfish. The pretty-but-voracious aquarium favorite, which has been gobbling other reef fish throughout the Caribbean, is swimming up South Florida's estuaries, invading the Gulf of Mexico and spreading along the South American coast. Scientists say the East Coast has never seen a mass marine invasion of this kind before, and they worry that it will set off a cascade of ecological damage to native fish, coral reef and their delicate habitat. Lionfish have been multiplying in the Caribbean and along the Carolina coast for more than a decade, probably after a few were dumped from somebody's aquarium off the shores of South Florida and their offspring rode north and east on ocean currents.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2013 | By David Fleshler
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Aboard the submersible Antipodes, cruising 250 feet beneath the surface off Fort Lauderdale, scientists peered through violet water and saw exactly what they hoped not to see. About 15 lionfish - venomous, flamboyantly striped invaders from half a world away - swam around the starboard bow of a freighter that was sunk as an artificial reef. When the submersible drifted toward the wreck's stern, they counted 11 more. The dive last month was one of a series to gauge the extent of the infestation of the nonnative fish on the region's reefs, using a vessel donated by OceanGate, which operates submersibles for oil and gas exploration, scientific research, marine engineering and other uses.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2013 | By David Fleshler
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Aboard the submersible Antipodes, cruising 250 feet beneath the surface off Fort Lauderdale, scientists peered through violet water and saw exactly what they hoped not to see. About 15 lionfish - venomous, flamboyantly striped invaders from half a world away - swam around the starboard bow of a freighter that was sunk as an artificial reef. When the submersible drifted toward the wreck's stern, they counted 11 more. The dive last month was one of a series to gauge the extent of the infestation of the nonnative fish on the region's reefs, using a vessel donated by OceanGate, which operates submersibles for oil and gas exploration, scientific research, marine engineering and other uses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way June Kisiel tells it, she fell for the story hook, line and sinker. She says she believed it when she was told that the sad-faced little fish she was buying for her home aquarium was a finicky eater and a slow-motion swimmer. So finicky and slow, in fact, that it would only eat specially raised minnows fed to it by hand. As it turned out, the creature with zebra stripes and sunburst-like fins that the Burbank woman proudly added to the tank in her family room was anything but a pussycat.
OPINION
May 6, 2013 | By Chelsea Kahn
In recent years, the Indo-Pacific lionfish - a dramatically striped, finned and armored aquarium fish - has invaded Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs. It has been spotted off the Southeastern United States, throughout the Caribbean Sea, in the Gulf of Mexico, and it's now eating its way toward South America. What's to blame for this invasion? Most likely aquarium releases beginning in the early 1980s. And once introduced, lionfish took off. The fish has no known predator in the Atlantic.
SCIENCE
August 16, 2008 | David McFadden, The Associated Press
A maroon-striped marauder with venomous spikes is rapidly multiplying in the Caribbean's warm waters, swallowing native species, stinging divers and wreaking havoc on an ecologically delicate region. The red lionfish, a tropical native of the Indian and Pacific oceans that probably escaped from a Florida fish tank, is showing up everywhere -- from the coasts of Cuba and Hispaniola to Little Cayman's pristine Bloody Bay Wall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
For Aurora Vallejos, learning about sea creatures like the lion-fish and spider crab was interesting enough in the classroom, but on a recent trip to the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies, the first-grader found she likes the real thing even better. "I like to see them and touch them," Aurora said as she watched a brightly colored lion-fish gulp down a goldfish in an aquarium at the magnet school in Reseda.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
A crushing medical bill can cause money problems not just for a cash-strapped patient but for his or her entire family. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show more than one in four U.S. families recently experienced a financial burden due to the cost of medical care. Among Americans who participated in the National Health Interview Survey in 2012, 8.9% said they were currently having problems paying a medical bill and another 7.6% said they had been in that situation sometime in the previous 12 months.
OPINION
May 6, 2013 | By Chelsea Kahn
In recent years, the Indo-Pacific lionfish - a dramatically striped, finned and armored aquarium fish - has invaded Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs. It has been spotted off the Southeastern United States, throughout the Caribbean Sea, in the Gulf of Mexico, and it's now eating its way toward South America. What's to blame for this invasion? Most likely aquarium releases beginning in the early 1980s. And once introduced, lionfish took off. The fish has no known predator in the Atlantic.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2011 | By William E. Gibson, Washington Bureau
Beware the lionfish. The pretty-but-voracious aquarium favorite, which has been gobbling other reef fish throughout the Caribbean, is swimming up South Florida's estuaries, invading the Gulf of Mexico and spreading along the South American coast. Scientists say the East Coast has never seen a mass marine invasion of this kind before, and they worry that it will set off a cascade of ecological damage to native fish, coral reef and their delicate habitat. Lionfish have been multiplying in the Caribbean and along the Carolina coast for more than a decade, probably after a few were dumped from somebody's aquarium off the shores of South Florida and their offspring rode north and east on ocean currents.
SCIENCE
August 16, 2008 | David McFadden, The Associated Press
A maroon-striped marauder with venomous spikes is rapidly multiplying in the Caribbean's warm waters, swallowing native species, stinging divers and wreaking havoc on an ecologically delicate region. The red lionfish, a tropical native of the Indian and Pacific oceans that probably escaped from a Florida fish tank, is showing up everywhere -- from the coasts of Cuba and Hispaniola to Little Cayman's pristine Bloody Bay Wall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way June Kisiel tells it, she fell for the story hook, line and sinker. She says she believed it when she was told that the sad-faced little fish she was buying for her home aquarium was a finicky eater and a slow-motion swimmer. So finicky and slow, in fact, that it would only eat specially raised minnows fed to it by hand. As it turned out, the creature with zebra stripes and sunburst-like fins that the Burbank woman proudly added to the tank in her family room was anything but a pussycat.
OPINION
September 6, 2006 | David Helvarg, DAVID HELVARG is president of the Blue Frontier Campaign (bluefront.org).
THREE MONTHS ago, I stepped on a sea urchin in Hawaii, and my foot still hurts some. That's hardly comparable to the sadly ironic death of "Crocodile Hunter" Steve Irwin, killed by the barb of a stingray, one of the ocean's more benign creatures, while snorkeling on the Great Barrier Reef.
TRAVEL
August 14, 2011 | By Kayleigh Kulp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all marveled at the hideous thing, trying not to gasp through our regulators. It was black, striped and about the size of a bass, fins fanning out in all directions. Scuba divers see a lot of weird-looking things but appreciate them all the same. But our dive masters told us that there were bounties on these lionfish, ugly creatures that destroy reef-cleaning fish populations. No one knows where they came from or how many threaten Curaçao's marine park. I had come to this small Caribbean island, 35 miles off Venezuela, in June with my father, Matt, a small-business owner.
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