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NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Liposuction patients are usually after one thing: a better-looking body. But a new study suggests the cosmetic procedure that removes fat from well-padded areas of the body may also reduce harmful fat circulating in the blood. Research to be presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons in Denver was aimed at measuring triglyceride levels in 229 people having liposuction. In people with normal triglyceride levels, cosmetic surgery made no difference.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A former Encino cosmetic surgeon was charged with involuntary manslaughter Tuesday for allegedly giving a toxic cocktail of drugs to a 61-year-old woman who died after a 10-hour liposuction operation. Ehab Alby Mohamed, 46, is expected to be arraigned Wednesday at the Van Nuys courthouse, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Mohamed is charged in the Aug. 21, 2010, death of Sharon Carpenter. DOCUMENTS: Read the state medical board suspension order and accusation She was was given a lethal mixture of lidocane, fentanyl and oxycodone during the procedure in Mohamed's Encino office, according to prosecutors.
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NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Liposuction may not be the permanent body-contouring solution that some patients hope. Not only does the fat come back, a small study suggests, it can come back in different, equally undesirable places. That’s what researchers from the University of Colorado saw when 14 healthy, non-obese women underwent “contouring” liposuction. The women, age 40 on average, weren’t fat overall — weighing an average of 138 pounds – they just had disproportionately large deposits of adipose tissue (a more formal name for fat)
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released its latest cosmetic and resconstructive surgery statistics on Monday.  Many of the trends were familiar.  In all, the group reported, Americans underwent 1.6 million cosmetic surgeries, including face-lifts, liposuction and rhinoplasty; 13 million minimally invasive procedures (think Botox injections) and 5.6 million reconstructive procedures (including tumor removal and scar revision).  People in the U.S. spent $11 billion on the cosmetic procedures alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A former Encino cosmetic surgeon was charged with involuntary manslaughter Tuesday for allegedly giving a toxic cocktail of drugs to a 61-year-old woman who died after a 10-hour liposuction operation. Ehab Alby Mohamed, 46, is expected to be arraigned Wednesday at the Van Nuys courthouse, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Mohamed is charged in the Aug. 21, 2010, death of Sharon Carpenter. DOCUMENTS: Read the state medical board suspension order and accusation She was was given a lethal mixture of lidocane, fentanyl and oxycodone during the procedure in Mohamed's Encino office, according to prosecutors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997 | GREG HERNANDEZ
A woman who died in March after undergoing 10 hours of liposuction surgery bled to death but toxic levels of anesthetic were a contributing factor, the Orange County coroner's office reported Monday. Lidocaine, usually administered intravenously to control pain, had not previously been mentioned in connection with the death of Judy Fernandez, a 47-year-old La Habra woman who died after a doctor withdrew about 20 pounds of fat from her body during the lengthy surgery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2011 | From a Los Angeles Times staff writer
A San Francisco man with no medical license performed liposuction on a woman while smoking a cigar, then flushed 6 pounds of fat he removed down her toilet, a newspaper reported Friday. Carlos Guzmangarza, 49, was arrested Thursday on suspicion of posing as a physician assistant to perform cosmetic surgery on the woman and treat her daughter for acne, said Stephanie Ong Stillman, a spokeswoman for the San Francisco district attorney's office. Guzmangarza is accused of operating a bogus clinic on Mission Street called the Derma Clinic, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.
NEWS
November 27, 1997 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Medical Board of California revoked the licenses Wednesday of a plastic surgeon and anesthesiologist whose liposuction patient died of blood loss after 10 1/2 hours of outpatient surgery in Irvine. Dr. W. Earle Matory Jr., 47, a board-certified plastic surgeon, and Dr. Robert K. Hoo, an anesthesiologist one year out of residency, committed gross negligence and incompetence in the case of Judy Fernandez, who died March 17, according to the administrative law judge who heard the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two paramedics and a hospital physician testified in court Thursday that they could have done nothing more to save Judy Fernandez's life when they were called to revive her after 10 hours of liposuction. Alan Wilkes, an Orange County Fire Authority paramedic, said the surgery left Fernandez unconscious and with so much blood-tinged fluid seeping from her body that it left a trail from the paramedic van to the emergency room.
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN and LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nearly three dozen liposuction patients contracted an unusual infection after being treated with dirty equipment by an Orange County surgeon, according to a county health report. The infections probably were caused by the reuse of disposable medical tubing or improper sterilization of other surgical tools, the report says. The source of the infection by a rapidly growing mycobacterium was traced to a faucet in the surgeon's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2011 | From a Los Angeles Times staff writer
A San Francisco man with no medical license performed liposuction on a woman while smoking a cigar, then flushed 6 pounds of fat he removed down her toilet, a newspaper reported Friday. Carlos Guzmangarza, 49, was arrested Thursday on suspicion of posing as a physician assistant to perform cosmetic surgery on the woman and treat her daughter for acne, said Stephanie Ong Stillman, a spokeswoman for the San Francisco district attorney's office. Guzmangarza is accused of operating a bogus clinic on Mission Street called the Derma Clinic, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Liposuction patients are usually after one thing: a better-looking body. But a new study suggests the cosmetic procedure that removes fat from well-padded areas of the body may also reduce harmful fat circulating in the blood. Research to be presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons in Denver was aimed at measuring triglyceride levels in 229 people having liposuction. In people with normal triglyceride levels, cosmetic surgery made no difference.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Liposuction may not be the permanent body-contouring solution that some patients hope. Not only does the fat come back, a small study suggests, it can come back in different, equally undesirable places. That’s what researchers from the University of Colorado saw when 14 healthy, non-obese women underwent “contouring” liposuction. The women, age 40 on average, weren’t fat overall — weighing an average of 138 pounds – they just had disproportionately large deposits of adipose tissue (a more formal name for fat)
BUSINESS
March 24, 2010 | By Fred Tasker
In better economic times, some in search of youth and beauty thought nothing of plunking down thousands of dollars for a cosmetic procedure. These days, tummy tucks are on sale. What's more, recent figures from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery say the number of cosmetic procedures in the U.S. -- such as eyelid lifts and liposuction -- fell 17% from 2008 to 2009. "It's the economy. People don't have the disposable income," said Dr. Darryl Blinski, a Miami plastic surgeon.
HEALTH
December 3, 2007 | Marnell Jameson, Special to The Times
Come in on your lunch hour, have a few injections and melt away those stubborn bulges of fat. That promise has made injection lipolysis -- also called lipodissolve and mesotherapy -- one of the fastest-growing cosmetic procedures in the country, with centers sprouting up almost as fast as Starbucks stores. Nevermind that neither the procedure nor the drug cocktail used has FDA approval. Nevermind that Kansas and Nebraska are trying to ban the procedure.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A couple who authorities say performed liposuction in the basement of a home were charged with practicing medicine without a license after a female patient died. Luiz Carlos Ribeiro and Ana Maria Miranda Ribeiro pleaded not guilty at their arraignment. Fabiola DePaula, 24, died after being taken unconscious to a local hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An administrative law judge ordered the emergency suspension of a Lynwood obstetrician's medical license Thursday, finding that he was grossly negligent and unprofessional in his care of three liposuction patients, one of whom bled to death last June hours after an operation. Dr. Patrick Chavis' conduct "demonstrates an inability to perform some of the most basic duties required of a physician," Judge Samuel D. Reyes wrote in an 11-page decision released two days after a hearing on the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The physicians involved in Judy Fernandez's 10-hour liposuction and plastic surgery in Irvine last March ignored repeated "red flags" about her condition before she was rushed to a hospital and died, a state's attorney contended in court Wednesday. "The evidence will show that what happened on March 17 was a medical abomination," said Deputy Atty. Gen. Steven H.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2004
I read with interest the article about the ever-continuing dilemma of aging baby boomers in America ("The New Ideal: Forever 35-ish," June 13). As I watch my mother go through the real aging process with humor and tolerance, she said to me the other day, "No one teaches you how to grow old. They teach you everything else except that! I wonder why?" I really couldn't answer her (she is 85 years old and doesn't even have wrinkles!). Our youth-obsessed society has become a terrible, all-consuming way of life.
HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | Rosie Mestel
Perhaps you're still racking your brain for gift ideas; perhaps you're considering giving your nearest and dearest something homemade this holiday season. How fondly I remember in my school days making festive ceramic ashtrays for my folks. (My daughter informs me that they don't do this at schools anymore.
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