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Liquified Natural Gas

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2006 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
A major Australian energy firm plans to ship liquefied natural gas to Southern California with a new process that it says is safer and more environmentally sound than the use of the terminals that three other companies want to construct in the state. A Woodside Energy Ltd. subsidiary is set to announce its plans Wednesday at a Sacramento news conference but will not disclose where off the coast it hopes to build its system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2006 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
A major Australian energy firm plans to ship liquefied natural gas to Southern California with a new process that it says is safer and more environmentally sound than the use of the terminals that three other companies want to construct in the state. A Woodside Energy Ltd. subsidiary is set to announce its plans Wednesday at a Sacramento news conference but will not disclose where off the coast it hopes to build its system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1995
The South Coast Air Quality Management District awarded $600,000 to the Los Angeles Department of Airports to help buy 10 new buses powered by liquid natural gas for travelers at Los Angeles International Airport. LNG buses, as they are known, create less pollution than diesel or natural-gas-powered vehicles. The airport already operates 14 of these clean-burning buses, and officials plan to buy enough multi-passenger LNG vehicles to replace the airport's entire bus fleet--50 in all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1995
The South Coast Air Quality Management District awarded $600,000 to the Los Angeles Department of Airports to help buy 10 new buses powered by liquid natural gas for travelers at Los Angeles International Airport. LNG buses, as they are known, create less pollution than diesel or natural-gas-powered vehicles. The airport already operates 14 of these clean-burning buses, and officials plan to buy enough multi-passenger LNG vehicles to replace the airport's entire bus fleet--50 in all.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest potential deal so far between foreign energy companies and the Russian energy industry, a U.S.-Japanese consortium has won the international competition to explore two big oil and gas fields on Sakhalin Island, off the Siberian coast. After months of rumors and speculation, the MMM Group--comprised of Marathon Oil Co. and McDermott International Inc., both U.S. firms, and Mitsui & Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2012 | By Erin Loury
Diesel engines power commerce and transportation around the world, but the exhaust they produce can prove deadly. The World Health Organization (WHO) announced on Tuesday that it now classifies diesel exhaust as a cause of cancer. While major advances in technology have helped clean up some diesel pollution in the United States, the findings could have serious implications for developing countries still relying on dirty diesel power. Following a week-long meeting of experts, the WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded there was sufficient evidence that diesel exhaust can cause lung cancer , and noted it may also increase the risk of bladder cancer.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Prices for natural gas, the fuel that supplies more than 20% of U.S. energy needs, are three times what they were last year. And experts say relatively high prices will persist through 2001 and probably 2002. The effect on home heating and electric bills, especially in California and the Western states, will be dramatic. Residential customers can expect a 30% rise in gas bills. Commercial and industrial users will be hit with increased costs over the next two to three years.
WORLD
June 3, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
No escaping the conundrum of Syria's war Monday-Tuesday, June 3-4 - Russian and European leaders face an agenda packed with economic and political issues at their two-day summit in the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg.  But as with most diplomatic gatherings these days, the debate and discussion are expected to be dominated by the protracted tragedy of Syria. Russia, a longtime ally and key weapons supplier to the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad, has on one hand been working with U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry to bring the embattled Syrian leadership and rebels to peace talks expected to be held in Geneva.
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