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Lisa Freeman Grant

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each day, Lisa Freeman-Grant works against a shorter and shorter deadline. It's called death. Her clients: Holocaust survivors, whose average age has climbed to 81. Her job: to get them, free of charge, reparations from countries and companies that took part in the Holocaust. It's a frustrating, byzantine process so impenetrable that survivors usually "will get discouraged or die" before they see any money, said Henry Kress, a 75-year-old who was interned at Auschwitz. "It's a heartbreaker."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each day, Lisa Freeman-Grant works against a shorter and shorter deadline. It's called death. Her clients: Holocaust survivors, whose average age has climbed to 81. Her job: to get them, free of charge, reparations from countries and companies that took part in the Holocaust. It's a frustrating, byzantine process so impenetrable that survivors usually "will get discouraged or die" before they see any money, said Henry Kress, a 75-year-old who was interned at Auschwitz. "It's a heartbreaker."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each day, Lisa Freeman-Grant works against a shorter and shorter deadline. It's called death. Her clients: Holocaust survivors, whose average age has climbed to 81. Her job: to get them, free of charge, reparations from countries and companies that took part in the Holocaust. It's a frustrating, byzantine process so impenetrable that survivors usually "will get discouraged or die" before they see any money, said Henry Kress, a 75-year-old who was interned at Auschwitz. "It's a heartbreaker."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each day, Lisa Freeman-Grant works against a shorter and shorter deadline. It's called death. Her clients: Holocaust survivors, whose average age has climbed to 81. Her job: to get them, free of charge, reparations from countries and companies that took part in the Holocaust. It's a frustrating, byzantine process so impenetrable that survivors usually "will get discouraged or die" before they see any money, said Henry Kress, a 75-year-old who was interned at Auschwitz. "It's a heartbreaker."
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